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Hi. I have a 2017 Sportage 1.7 crdi ISG (1).
What ISG mean and how can i activate it?
 

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It is the system that stops the engine when you stop, and restarts it when you want to move off. You do not need to activate it, it is activated as a norm.
It requires many targets to be met before it works.
 

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I heard some guys online who wants to activate this ISG thats why i asked. Dont know many about this car either. Fuel 44.00mpg on the motorway.
In town drops 43.42.40..maybe lower
 

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Intelligent Stop & Go
 
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It's an emissions thing mainly. So cars aren't chucking out nasties at traffic lights or while parents are waiting for kids at school gates etc. Motoring media have supposedly done tests and over the life of a car (given as 10 years at average mileage of 10K a year) it supposedly saves no more than a tank of fuel(ie: for most cars, no more than £75). So as a saves money selling point by the salesman, technically true, but you aren't likely to be going on exotic foreign holidays with the savings :)
As iooi says, many parameters need to be met before ISG works (ie: engine at normal temperature, battery good).
Very often folks complain about it not working but its simply the parameters aren't met.
You mention town mpg being lower. This is normal with all cars. As an example, I have a Venga auto and around town it does 23mpg. On a run on A roads / Motorways it does around 38mpg.
 

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These systems also require an upgraded battery and assuming it fails to last the 10 years mentioned then the fuel saving will be wiped out by the increased battery replacement cost. It is all about reducing emissions in the ideal test conditions that are quoted and used to compare vehicles one against another.
 

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Cars use more fuel to stop & start the engine than it would to simply leave it idling - unless you're stopped for a considerable time (e.g. traffic jam or lengthy queue) - in which case the driver could easily turn the engine off themselves without the need for a system to do it for them.
Plus these systems consume starter motors at an alarming rate & require a very expensive battery.
So absolutely best policy is to disable it or better still, buy a car without it.
 

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Cars use more fuel to stop & start the engine than it would to simply leave it idling - unless you're stopped for a considerable time (e.g. traffic jam or lengthy queue)
Not sure about that. Why would an engine use more fuel when you start it than when its running. The reason for stop/start is to improve air quality in towns and cities and for that reason I am all for it.

Plus these systems consume starter motors at an alarming rate & require a very expensive battery.
We have had 7 cars with stop start since 2005 and in that time we have no stater motor failures. Had problems with one battery after a few months but that was faulty and its free replacement worked perfectly for the next 5 1/2 years.

So absolutely best policy is to disable it
If you permanently disabled it you could potentially fall foul of your insurers for having a modified car plus the DVLA could in theory require your car to be re certified since it would not meet the CO figures on the certification.

or better still, buy a car without it.
How many new cars available today do not have stop/start fitted? I cannot honestly think of any.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Cars use more fuel to stop & start the engine than it would to simply leave it idling - unless you're stopped for a considerable time (e.g. traffic jam or lengthy queue) - in which case the driver could easily turn the engine off themselves without the need for a system to do it for them.
Plus these systems consume starter motors at an alarming rate & require a very expensive battery.
So absolutely best policy is to disable it or better still, buy a car without it.
Is there any way to disable this ISG function permanently instead of pressing the on/off button everytime after i switch on engine ?
 

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Looking on another car forum surprised to see the cost of replacing the battery is between £300-£500 for some models.didn’t see that when reading the benefits of ISG,,!
 

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Looking on another car forum surprised to see the cost of replacing the battery is between £300-£500 for some models.didn’t see that when reading the benefits of ISG,,!
I could believe it although some are absolutely crazy money I got a good branded amg one for my car for £140
 

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Not sure about that. Why would an engine use more fuel when you start it than when its running. The reason for stop/start is to improve air quality in towns and cities and for that reason I am all for it.



We have had 7 cars with stop start since 2005 and in that time we have no stater motor failures. Had problems with one battery after a few months but that was faulty and its free replacement worked perfectly for the next 5 1/2 years.
It takes more fuel to START and engine (you have to inject a lot of fuel in to make it physically start) than it takes to idle the engine for a few mins. That's why it uses more fuel when you continually stop & start it.

My FIL is a local mechanic in Essex and since the proliferation of Stop/Start cars he's replacing starter motors at around 2-3x the rate that he was 5 years ago - always on stop/start vehicles. Not only that he reports the cost of starter motors has more than doubled in the last few years due to the huge increase in demand.
 

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It takes more fuel to START and engine (you have to inject a lot of fuel in to make it physically start) than it takes to idle the engine for a few mins. That's why it uses more fuel when you continually stop & start it.
On old cars where you had to appply the acclerator to get them to catch that was the case but with modern injected engines there is no need to touch the pedal even when they are cold, they simply start.

My FIL is a local mechanic in Essex and since the proliferation of Stop/Start cars he's replacing starter motors at around 2-3x the rate that he was 5 years ago - always on stop/start vehicles. Not only that he reports the cost of starter motors has more than doubled in the last few years due to the huge increase in demand.
I can only tell it form personal experience. 7 cars with stop/start between me and the Mrs over 15 years and no new starters.
 

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When the car starts, no you don't press the accelerator, but that's because the throttle is "fly by wire" now - not physical cable. Just because YOU are not pressing the accelerator, doesn't mean the ECU isn't doing it for you - and it is - which is why Stop/Start tends to use as much, if not more, fuel than simply letting the car idle.
 

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When the car starts, no you don't press the accelerator, but that's because the throttle is "fly by wire" now - not physical cable. Just because YOU are not pressing the accelerator, doesn't mean the ECU isn't doing it for you - and it is - which is why Stop/Start tends to use as much, if not more, fuel than simply letting the car idle.
I knew all that but it is unlikely that the car uses more fuel starting than not running. I think you have been reading too much on sites that simply post what owneres who hate modern tech want to believe.
 

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I've not been on any sites. It's just pure physics of what is required to start an engine that is not running v/s how little fuel is needed to keep an engine at idle.

I subscribe to a few motoring magazines and it's interesting to note that a few "long termers" in the various fleets the owner has disabled stop/start every trip to see what effect it has on fuel economy and almost without fail, all have reported improved economy with s/s disabled.
 

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The main point of isg is the reduction in exhaust gasses in congested built up areas. Given the density of cars and long waits at a standstill, if every car had isg, the reduction would be significant.

I've not bothered to read much about it but there are OEM's defying 'physics' these days. By stopping the engine at a specific point in the cycle, the restart is much more efficient. Lighter load on the starter, less fuel required, it's not just the car taking over the start/stop button.
 
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