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Hi everyone, I'm new to this forum so if this is the wrong thread to post in I apologise but.... my 2021 e-niro 4+ went in for its first (although a little delayed because of COVID-19 I am told) service today at 11 months old and with just over 12k miles on it. I left the car at Bolton KIA and went off in search of a decent cup of coffee. On my return the technician handed me my paperwork and mumbled something about the front tyres. I didn't think anything of it but on looking at the paperwork it tells me my tyres on the front of the car are 78% worn. Surely this can't be right i thought to myself, so I set google loose on finding out if other Niro drivers were having the same issue and came across this forum. So to get to my point... has anyone else found this and have they pursued Kia or Michelin and if so what result did they achieve? Thanks 馃槉
 

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Hi & Welcome.

E-Niro is not a light car, thanks to the batteries. But what it does have is a lot of very linear power delivery. So unlike a ICE which has short bursts of power, your ev applies it power all the way. So that means more tyre wear.
Especially if you like to exercise the power you have away from lights.

So there is nothing wrong with the tyres. A hard driven ICE can wear tyres as fast or faster. Only in a ICE you know you are driving hard. In a EV you do not have the same feel of driving hard, as there is no gear changing.

So you should get 14K out of the tyres. Which is about par for a lot of cars. But you will always have someone saying they got a lot more.
(y)
What mode do you drive in ? Bet it's not ECO

Enjoy the drive. Remember that you are saving on costs, so wearing out tyres is not a big deal. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply and welcome, believe it or not we do have it permanently on eco! I was just a bit shocked, my last car which was an ICE, went back after four years with 40k miles on it with only one replacement set of tyres. Lots of interesting threads on the forum which I will probably spend hours reading 馃槄
 

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My Skoda Octavia wore out the front Bridgestones in 9000 miles, but I knew they were spinning on take off (roundabouts and t junctions). At third service, at local dealer, rather than chain dealer, they agreed not right and found a Skoda software update, not spun up since!!! It is the high power (mine is 1.5 petrol turbo) of modern turbo cars AND EV with front wheel drive, that keeps the tills ringing in tyre dealers. All wheel drive do not suffer so much (last car was Subaru, and 40k on tyres). As stated, it is surprising how powerful EV cars are, even on Eco mode.
 

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It's down to the ability (or not!) of the driver to feel that the vehicle they are supposedly in control of is being driven sensibly.
More right foot = more tyre wear. Basic maths......
 

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I would agree, or did, until dealer upgraded software. Unfortunately, modern cars seem to be controlled by computers, rather than the driver, as I found. No matter how careful I was, the tyres still spun up - but they don鈥檛 now, and I haven鈥檛 changed my way of driving (53 years and counting!).
 

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My Skoda Octavia wore out the front Bridgestones in 9000 miles, but I knew they were spinning on take off (roundabouts and t junctions). At third service, at local dealer, rather than chain dealer, they agreed not right and found a Skoda software update, not spun up since!!! It is the high power (mine is 1.5 petrol turbo) of modern turbo cars AND EV with front wheel drive, that keeps the tills ringing in tyre dealers. All wheel drive do not suffer so much (last car was Subaru, and 40k on tyres). As stated, it is surprising how powerful EV cars are, even on Eco mode.
We had a 2017 Superb with the 1.4 petrol turbo in it (same power output and torques but not Euro 6 like the 1.5). Had it just over 3.5 years and did 25,000 miles and when PX'd the fronts still had about 4 mm on the original tyres, the rears were as new. It would spin up the front wheels momentarily on damp roads (TC soon sorted that) when moving off if you were enthusiastic but never had a single issue on dry roads.

It was replaced by a Superb PHEV, 218 PS instead of 150 PS and 300 Lbs or torque instead of 185 torques. Even on a wet road never had a single issue, the power feeds in beautifully smoothly and very few cars beat you away from lights. I actually checked the tyres last week when I cleaned it, after about 8,000 miles they show no obvious wear.

First car was on Pirelli's, this one is on Michelins. Same size on both 215 55 17.
 

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I had to replace the Michelin tyres on the front of my 2020 HeV at 12,000 miles, which I thought was "a bit soon". Let's see what the Uniroyals wear like! I've already found the grip is better than the Michelins.
 

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Strewth!! My fronts have done 28k and I reckon there is still another 4k wear before I need to think about replacing them.
 

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All tyres are a compromise between the various elements that vehicle drivers would wish to 'box-tick' when choosing their rubber. Some tyres may lean towards one feature more than another while a different manufacturer may favour the opposite.

Drivers, however, have absolute control over vehicle speed, whatever road surface they drive on, and it is they who determine how quickly they wish to accelerate away from rest and how much they rely on the brakes to retard the car for traffic lights, roundabouts, etc. Those with a bit of sense who eschew Santa Pod - type starts and drive with consideration for mechanical components, tyres, brakes and other human beings will achieve far greater mileage from a set of tyres, from brakes and clutches, than boy racer types who feel that any drive is an opportunity to demonstrate their disregard for speed limits and common decency. End of sermon! :)
 
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So you should get 14K out of the tyres. Which is about par for a lot of cars. But you will always have someone saying they got a lot more.
About par for SOME cars maybe but definitely wouldn't say a lot, I don't think I've ever had to replace tyres after less that 20k miles with some lasting to 30k.
 

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About par for SOME cars maybe but definitely wouldn't say a lot, I don't think I've ever had to replace tyres after less that 20k miles with some lasting to 30k.
When we bought our Ceed SW CRDi in 2010 I managed to pick up a set of brand new genuine Kia 16" wheels off E-Bay that the seller had taken off before he had even driven the car and replaced with 18" wheels just for the looks. Paid 拢200, I was the only bidder. Took off the brand new tyres and fitted a set of winters, sold the tyres on E-Bay, got 拢130 thus the wheels stood me at 拢70, bargain. At the time the wife was commuting 40 miles a day and some of the roads were none to great, winters were desirable.

Rotated the wheels from summer to winter in early November and from winter to summer in late March early April every year.

When we sold the car in 2015 it still had the original Michelin summer tyres on it. They had covered approx 30,000 miles and still had loads of life. The rears had worn to an odd pattern and had become noisy, garage said it was normal, never seen it before, they had been changed front to rear on every summer/winter swap. After 20,000 miles the winters still had loads of life, they had just over 5mm tread. Sold the wheel/winter tyres on E-Bay for just over 拢200, someone got a bargain.

The cost of tyres for the Ceed over 50,000 miles was the 拢70 I paid for the wheels + 拢230 for the winter tyres fitted, total 拢300, knock off the 拢200 I got back for them, my total bill was about 拢100.

Never had such cheap motoring. If I had not bought the winters I would have needed a set of summers which for the 225 45 17 Michelins would have cost me probably 拢350 at the time, about 拢430 now. Suppose its still not bad over 50,000 miles but those winter tyres saved me money.
 

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Tyres are such a minor cost compared to fuel, for me at least. And that's top of the premium range (ps4's).
Just worked mine out & petrol over 14K = 拢1960 @ current price. Just got a new set of Cross Climate 2 @ 拢570

Sobering thought... EV for the win 馃う鈥嶁檪锔 if they spend less than 拢1390 on electric.
 

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Just worked mine out & petrol over 14K = 拢1960 @ current price. Just got a new set of Cross Climate 2 @ 拢570

Sobering thought... EV for the win 馃う鈥嶁檪锔 if they spend less than 拢1390 on electric.
Fair point for the ev'ers. Fuel for me is mostly 99ron @ 1.50+ and around 15k miles a year. Two front tyres is 拢200 with usual discounts. Roughly speaking, my tyres are close to only a twelfth of my fuel costs.
 

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Front tyres on my 250bhp Saab only manage about 10k miles. However it gets very few decent motorway runs a year (though less for the past 2 years) but otherwise a lot of short runs with disproportionately large amounts of low-speed manoeuvring.

The rears will generally retain tread well up to the point where age alone suggests it would be good to change them. However at about half worn they start to produce a noise like a worn out wheel bearing at speeds around 20 - 35 mph. It is, apparently, a feature of the model. One learns to live with it rather than throw away half used tyres.

I have no idea what the HEV will do but with 3k on the meter the fronts look a bit worn. I'll get a measurement soon for the records.

Tread depth in new tyres may be worth watching.

My wife's recent departed Toyota had new rear tyres (due to age rather than being worn out) the day before its last annual service and MOT test last September. The test checklist showed them as 20% worn. It looked like the measurable depth, in places, was about 7mm when the expectation would be 9mm when new.
 

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I have heard (no names, no pack drill), that certain car manufacturers buy tyres of a less deep tread depth, for fitting to their new cars, as it cuts down on their costs, but also shaves off a bit more weight for mpg test data.
Still annoyed that original dealer failed to upgrade the gearbox and traction control software, costing me a set of tyres. Since the second dealer upgraded it, I have had no wheel spin - so it wasn鈥檛 me, guv!
 

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I have heard (no names, no pack drill), that certain car manufacturers buy tyres of a less deep tread depth, for fitting to their new cars, as it cuts down on their costs, but also shaves off a bit more weight for mpg test data.
Our 3 Skoda's bought since 2017 have all had what I would call a full tread depth (as have every other new car we have bought since 1978) and I have never seen it suggested that OEM tyres have less tread. Since the weight saved would be minimal it would make no measurable difference to mpg and ho it would cut their costs when they buy on price in bulk is beyond belief and for starters the tyre manufacturers would have to make special moulds for these OEM tyres which they would pass on.

Think you have been listening in the pub too often.
 

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I was always told the original manufactures tyres were better than what you got aftermarket, but that would also seem unlikely.
 
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