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Back on topic: I agree with the general opinion that these goop kits are far from a good solution. Many tyre problems cannot be fixed this way. If you have run on a flat for the distance it takes to make the hard shoulder the tyre will be toast, or the puncture is too big, or the bead seal has failed or the wheel is damaged Even if it works the goop will write off the tyre anyway, and probably the TPMS sensor too.

I have used a skinny spare on a couple of occasions and they do the job OK. Problem with a full size spare is not just the space - usually no TPMS fitted so can't leave it in situ - but ordinary tyres degrade over time so you will be throwing away a practically unused tyre in 10 years time. The skinnies use a more durable compound.
 

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Agreed, there are pros & cons, however I’m happy carrying the repair kit.
I’d be more concerned if my car went into limp mode 50 miles from home.
Had a look round on the web for opinions & found this...
 

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Not really a good idea to change a drivers side wheel on a motorway,I’d rather wait for a rescue/breakdown truck.................than get killed.
Waiting for a breakdown truck can also be deadly, prefer to get of ASAP.

Take my last experience of a breakdown company. The car simply lost power and I had to coast to as safe a place as I could find. No hard should but it was a major 4 carriageway trunk road with plenty of grass. Quicky ascertained it was a fuel pump or its relay/fuse. Relay and fuse tested OK but pump did not prime, it was dead. RAC said since I was on a road they clessed as requiring immediate recovery they would be with me within the hour, that was at 12.45. They finally arrived at approz 17.00 despite probably 1/2 a dozen promises they were nearly with me. (Next day they gave me £125 compensation for letting me down badly).

With regards to a tyre if you have no spare what will the breakdown man fit? So you then have to wait until the breakdown man finds a tyre shop open with a suitable tyre, goes and purchase it for you and comes back and fit the wheel. What are your family doing all this time.

But imagine its a Sunday pm in Scotland with little recovery cover and no tyre shops open. How long would you be waiting?

Suppose the outcome would be to recover your car and then find a hotel. Who pays for all this, yup, its you.

So which is it, gunk or spare?
 

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Agreed, there are pros & cons, however I’m happy carrying the repair kit.
I’d be more concerned if my car went into limp mode 50 miles from home.
Had a look round on the web for opinions & found this...
This seems to be a relatively dispassionate analysis of the pros and cons apart from the unsupported arm waving conclusion

"It may not be a perfect solution for every situation, but covers most people’s needs most of the time. "

I hate it when journalists present an opinion based upon exactly zero data.

A possible interpretation of this statement:

most people = 51% of people

most of the time = 51% of the time

which could therefore mean 26% of incidents are met by the goop.

This is a bit of an extreme interpretation but it shows the importance of critical analysis. Contrast this against a full size spare which should meet all of the people's needs 99.9% of the time (a few unlucky souls will need more than one spare).
 

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Interestingly just looked at the specs of all the various Sportage models, every single one now comes with the bloody Tyre Mobility Kit.
From here
Temporary Spare Wheel - 1.6 T-GDi and 1.6 CRDi only

Thankfully noticed it at the weekend when looked under boot floor.
 

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ArthurCollins2
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#17 17 hours ago
It doesn't always end in death.....

I would have thought ONCE was enough for most people..........

and not regarded as an option by the AA
Leaving me waiting for 6hrs in an unlit industrial area in Birmingham is.

I swear that was worse than changing the wheel in the rain, in the dark, at the side of the M40. I had a triangle 30yds back, full hi-vis jacket and a keen eye on what was coming down the inside lane. Puncture to driving away, probably 10mins. I understand its not something you would attempt but if you know what you're doing, it's really not that bad.
 

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Going over the barrier/waiting for the breakdown service increases the risk of exposure/freezing to those folk who dont carry a coat in the car in winter:mad: or are inappropriately dressed for the weather.
 

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The only thing I would add to the discussion re 'gunge' kit v spare wheel is this:

While few motorists find the prospect of having to actually use the kit an attractive proposition, the possible alternative of removing the wheel with the punctured tyre and replacing it with a spare wheel isn't exactly a walk in the park either.

For those who have never actually manhandled a full-size, inflated spare wheel of say, 18" or 19" diameter in recent times, let me tell you, they are damned heavy to manoeuvre and line-up on the hub, in the dark, by the side of the road while the vehicle is precariously perched on the weedy jack supplied with the car; not an operation to be taken lightly.

It might be ok with 15" wheels but many of us drive on much bigger rims these days, 18",19" 20" & 21" being fairly common.

I never liked spacesaver spare wheels but in an emergency, they are far lighter and much easier to deal with than the full-size version. They come, though, with a speed restriction and should really be seen as a stop-gap to be used only until the punctured tyre has been mended or replaced.

There is a case to be made for run-flat tyres and I'm surprised that they are not used more widely by car manufacturers. That may have something to do with the bad press they have received over the years from 'boy-racer' motoring journos, complaining about their shortcomings on a BMW M3 or the like compared to the best regular tyres. 'Tendency to tramline' and 'Twitchy on the limit' are the kind of remarks I recall which rather stifled sales and the progress of tyre technology.

'Ye pays yer money'………..!
 

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There is a case to be made for run-flat tyres and I'm surprised that they are not used more widely by car manufacturers. That may have something to do with the bad press they have received over the years from 'boy-racer' motoring journos, complaining about their shortcomings on a BMW M3 or the like compared to the best regular tyres. 'Tendency to tramline' and 'Twitchy on the limit' are the kind of remarks I recall which rather stifled sales and the progress of tyre technology.
As far as I am aware BMW have never fitted run flats to any of their "real" "M" series cars such as the M3, the M Sport Division have refused to use them because of the compromises.

In recent times I have read that Run Flats have improved but they are still very heavy (do not make the CO's any better) and are very expensive for brands other than the ditchfinders. Pretty sure you cannot use gunge in them either.

But the fact is you cannot drive a run flat for more than 50 miles "flat" and you still have to reduce speed. Once run flat they are not repairable and very few tyre shops actually stock them meaning you would need to buy a standard tyre to get home and then replace it with a run flat later (double expense).

But with TPMS on all new cars I do wonder how many people simply ignore the light (like all warning lights) and drive until its too late. We have had (from memory) 3 TMPS warnings in the 14 years we have had TPMS equipped cars. 2 were at motorway speed, the first was a screw and the 2nd was on a cold morning and the tyre was simply below the 2 PSI threshold, still on the car today, no puncture, no more warnings. The third was on the Note as I pulled off the drive. Screw in the tyre and pressure down to 20 PSI. Replaced with spare, off to tyre shop, tyre repaired and refitted.
 

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I've had a reply from KCS re the error. Should be fixed soon. Sadly not sure which is right though.
I suspect all the petrol cars will be able to have a skinny spare. The diesel cars are now mild hybrid's and have the 48 volt battery in underfloor boot area, which means no room for a spare. But I am guessing... o_O
 

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I suspect all the petrol cars will be able to have a skinny spare. The diesel cars are now mild hybrid's and have the 48 volt battery in underfloor boot area, which means no room for a spare. But I am guessing... o_O
Just downloaded the brochure. Was not aware that ALL diesel were 48V as well. So Going to say you are correct that they won't get a spare. Just a case will they drop them for the petrol variants. (hope not) as they re my choice.
 
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