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South Korea - 2005 Sportage 1.6L V4 LX 4WD
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Hello Every one, I hope you stay healthy and safe.
Recently I bought the Kia Sportage CRDI 2005 that uses Diesel as fuel,
I really need to know the time needed to warm the car engine before start driving in winter and in the summer
Thank you very much.
 

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The advice given is to drive away immediately as long as windows are free of snow, ice, etc and it is safe to do so. There is no need to "warm" the engine. Don't use hard acceleration.
 

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As Lance posted above - in the summer you do not need to warm up the engine before driving but do not use harsh acceleration/high revs until warmed up (not that you need to rev a crdi engine anyway).

In winter if the Sportage has frost on windscreen or bad condensation I usually start the engine and wait at least 5 minutes before driving so that the heater will keep the windscreen clear,it sometimes takes 10 minutes if it is really cold and icy.
 

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The engine will warm as you drive, no need to warm it at Idle. It is made to be used like this.

At the first start of each day, Just let it run for 20 seconds or so so that the oil circulation is complete, this applies both summer and winter.
 

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2020 Sportage GT-Line CRDi
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It seems a strange question, a diesel car is no different than a petrol car, once started.
I wonder if the original poster was meaning how long to wait for the glow plugs to heat? The answer to that is switch ignition on, wait for the glow plug light to go out and immediately start the car. If you have a push button start the car works it out automatically.
 

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Well up here in sunny scotland - if leaving home in the morning at sub zero ambient temps - it would be foolhardy/extremely unwise to drive off as soon as engine starts because the windscreen will just ice up again or mist up badly making driving extremely dangerous.
That is assuming the car has been left outside and with no electric 'block heater/preheater' being used - slightly different if the car has been kept in a garage perhaps.
I do see people driving in the winter with only a small clear patch on the windscreen to look through :mad:

mr.macspot - Diesels do tend to take a bit longer to warm up as they are fairly cool running engines.
 
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