Kia Owners Club Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all
Just agreed to purchase a Kia Ceed Sportswagon 1.6 crdi 2 2015 with 58000 on clock after having it on trial for 10 days.
Been returning 57-60mpg on route to work for last 6 days.
Today same route taken at similar speed and driving conditions and only got 43.Figure was obtained from on board computer which I reset at that start of each journey.Anyone got any ideas to why it could have dropped by so much?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,472 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Its like a cat but with less attitude 😁

DPF is diesel particulate filter. Similar in concept to a cat but needs to heat itself up every so often to burn off the accumulated debris. During these regenerations your fuel consumption will rise.
The Kia has full service history all with main Kia main dealer except for the last one which was done at a Peugeot dealer which is where I bought it from.Noticed the oil was 10mm overfilled could that cause a problem?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,185 Posts
The Kia has full service history all with main Kia main dealer except for the last one which was done at a Peugeot dealer which is where I bought it from.Noticed the oil was 10mm overfilled could that cause a problem?
Being over filled won't help, but I believe your question has been answered at #2, in which case it's completely normal for a modern diesel


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,472 Posts
The Kia has full service history all with main Kia main dealer except for the last one which was done at a Peugeot dealer which is where I bought it from.Noticed the oil was 10mm overfilled could that cause a problem?

Drain some out. Just make sure car is totally level 1st (so turn it round and check again in same place), as it amazing how a small slope that you do not notice makes a big difference to oil level.

Then keep a eye on it, as it has been known for fuel to get into the sump, which leads to a overfill issue. Leaking injectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
337 Posts
It may have been doing a dpf regeneration. There's no way of knowing when it's happening, except that the exhaust is much hotter.

Happens about every 300 miles.
My Sportage diesels used to do that. About once a fortnight they would go into 'burn every ounce of fuel in the tank' mode. It would last for about 10 to 15 miles. Even coasting downhill didn't stop the mpg plummeting.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
Ours did a regen every 250 miles, took about 20 minutes at 60 mph on a motorway. During that time the mpg would halve. Best way to avoid it is buy a petrol.
Not any more, petrols now come with a GPF, which more or less does the same job as a DPF. They are being introduced on more petrol vehicles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Not any more, petrols now come with a GPF, which more or less does the same job as a DPF. They are being introduced on more petrol vehicles.
PPF's have been mandatory on most petrols since EU6c rules became law in September 2018. We have 2 cars fitted with them. They regenerate differently to DPF's, since the heat in the exhaust of a petrol car is much hotter than a diesel the passive regen that takes place constantly ensures that the pesky wasteful active regen when fuel is injected into the exhaust is not required in the same way. In truth injecting petrol into the exhaust would not be a good idea, the cars would sound like a boy racers Golf or Astra popping and farting as it goes down the road.

The only exceptions I am aware of are traditional non direct injection petrols and Toyota make most of those.

Never had an issue with ours, unlike a DPF we are not waiting for the next regen to start at some inconvenient moment.

Having said all that when the uncle needed a new car 18 months ago I was careful to ensure he got one without a PPF. His motoring is perefct to cause an issue with any car, a one mile round trip every morning to collect papers, milk etc and a 14 mile round trip once a week to the supermarket. Add in an occasional trip to a garden centre and its 1300 miles a year at best, probably less last year. So the last thing he needed was a PPF that only warmed up once a week at best. Discovered that the Suzuki Celerio did not have one and we were lucky to fine a garage with a number of pre reg ones at the right price.

Considering tha Kia DPF's have a good reputation it seems odd there are people with Stingers reporting issues with PPF's. Perhaps the big lazy V6 simply does not get worked hard enough on short trips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
PPF's have been mandatory on most petrols since EU6c rules became law in September 2018. We have 2 cars fitted with them. They regenerate differently to DPF's, since the heat in the exhaust of a petrol car is much hotter than a diesel the passive regen that takes place constantly ensures that the pesky wasteful active regen when fuel is injected into the exhaust is not required in the same way. In truth injecting petrol into the exhaust would not be a good idea, the cars would sound like a boy racers Golf or Astra popping and farting as it goes down the road.

The only exceptions I am aware of are traditional non direct injection petrols and Toyota make most of those.

Never had an issue with ours, unlike a DPF we are not waiting for the next regen to start at some inconvenient moment.

Having said all that when the uncle needed a new car 18 months ago I was careful to ensure he got one without a PPF. His motoring is perefct to cause an issue with any car, a one mile round trip every morning to collect papers, milk etc and a 14 mile round trip once a week to the supermarket. Add in an occasional trip to a garden centre and its 1300 miles a year at best, probably less last year. So the last thing he needed was a PPF that only warmed up once a week at best. Discovered that the Suzuki Celerio did not have one and we were lucky to fine a garage with a number of pre reg ones at the right price.

Considering tha Kia DPF's have a good reputation it seems odd there are people with Stingers reporting issues with PPF's. Perhaps the big lazy V6 simply does not get worked hard enough on short trips.
As a Stinger owner you are correct, lots of us having issues with this on the Facebook forum and no definite way of knowing how to stop it. Both low and high mileage users getting it. I do high mileage and rag the hell out of it and red line it most drives and it still comes up every 1.5k-2k miles on average. Oddly both times mine has come on has been during a day where I have driven around 200 miles on the motorway. As you say, on a cruise the V6 is barely ticking over at 70 in 8th gear and as a PPF gets burned off through deceleration, probably doesn't get the exhaust hot enough to burn off.

Never had a single DPF light in my diesel Kia Ceed before this. At least a diesel DPF is easy to burn off, just drive it. Much harder to burn off a PPF unless holding a low gear, rev up to 6k and let the revs drop to 4k and repeat for 20 minutes. Seems to be the only way most of us Stinger owners are able to clear it.

I've said it before but it's incredibly ironic these are introduced to bring down C02 and the way to clear them is the rag the nuts off them on an unnecessary half an hour drive and average 18mpg in the process!!

I am sure it is part of an overall strategy to make even petrol cars a pain to own and make an electric car seem the better choice. The also absolutely kill and deaden the exhaust noise on sporty cars too which is half the reason why people want them! Anybody heard a new 911 which has a PPF? Sounds like a vacuum cleaner :cry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,322 Posts
Much harder to burn off a PPF unless holding a low gear, rev up to 6k and let the revs drop to 4k and repeat for 20 minutes. Seems to be the only way most of us Stinger owners are able to clear it.
Never researched what to do if the PPF light came on, just looked in the Superb manual and this is what it says:

Drive at a speed of at least 80 km/h (edit 50mph) at engine speeds between 3000-5000 rpm
Release the accelerator pedal and let the vehicle roll with the gear engaged for a few second
Repeat this procedure several times. If the filter is cleaned successfully, the indicator light goes out . If the indicator light does not go off within 30 minutes, the filter was not cleaned.

Similar but not quite as brutal. Not sure what gear that would be but obviously would need to use manual selection to keep the revs in the range. Hopefully never need to.

In the 10 years we owned diesels with DPF's (Ford, BWW and Kia) never had a light come on but twice when the Ceed went in for a service the garage commented that incomplete regens had been registered in the ECU log and a forced regen had been carried out (FOC).

I've said it before but it's incredibly ironic these are introduced to bring down C02 and the way to clear them is the rag the nuts off them on an unnecessary half an hour drive and average 18mpg in the process!!
PPF's (and DPF's) are not there to reduce CO2, that's the job of the CAT, they are there to collect and burn off particulates, that is the 2nd P in the name.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi all
Just agreed to purchase a Kia Ceed Sportswagon 1.6 crdi 2 2015 with 58000 on clock after having it on trial for 10 days.
Been returning 57-60mpg on route to work for last 6 days.
Today same route taken at similar speed and driving conditions and only got 43.Figure was obtained from on board computer which I reset at that start of each journey.Anyone got any ideas to why it could have dropped by so much?
Back to 62mpg on the work run today :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Never researched what to do if the PPF light came on, just looked in the Superb manual and this is what it says:

Drive at a speed of at least 80 km/h (edit 50mph) at engine speeds between 3000-5000 rpm
Release the accelerator pedal and let the vehicle roll with the gear engaged for a few second
Repeat this procedure several times. If the filter is cleaned successfully, the indicator light goes out . If the indicator light does not go off within 30 minutes, the filter was not cleaned.
2019 Ceed Petrol 1L T-GDI has these instructions :

The vehicle should be driven for more than 30 minutes at a speed of 80 km/h (50 mph) and faster. Ensure the following conditions are all met: safe road conditions, transmission 3rd gear or above, and engine speed of 1,500 - 4,000 rpm.

So basically take it on the motorway/dual carriageway and drive as normal, same as you would with a diesel.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,431 Posts
This article on Gasoline Particulate Filters suggests a different method.

How does a GPF regenerate?

GPF regeneration can only be performed in “non power” conditions, meaning that regeneration is normally achieved under deceleration. Deceleration increases the amount of oxygen following through the engine and exhaust system. This in turn raises the temperature of the GPF to around 400c – 700c, igniting the soot contained within the filter.

In conditions where this is not possible, the vehicles engine management systems alters timing causing it to run lean. This “lean” burn increases oxygen and therefore GPF operating temperatures, allowing a regeneration to occur.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top