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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There has been a recent spate of stolen Kia Sportages reported in the London area facilitated it seems by thieves using keyless technology.

Just a warning I think if we needed it, that it's so important these days keeping your vehicle secure and keeping keys protected by Faraday pouches etc.

I haven't included the link but if anyone is interested in the source of my information visit the Facebook page for Kia Owners club UK.
 

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Strange choice; burglars and drug dealers seem to prefer Golfs or Audi A3s (they must be as badge conscious as everyone else!). Roomy car though for all your swag, and those that are 4WD must be handy going across the fields...

Is there some particular weakness with the Sportage, I wonder?
 
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I've said it many times....
Keyless Entry - a solution to a problem that didn't exist.

I'm guessing Sportages are hugely popular at present so reselling becomes attractive for those of a car stealing mind set.

It is ironic that many car websites are now saying use a steering wheel lock,(you know, like we did in the 80's and 90's before immobilisers became a manufacturer thing :) )
 

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Not getting your fob out to do it is the point, you still press a button, albeit on the door.

If I leave football with the key in my trackies which are stuffed in my bag, I don't have to unpack in the rain or remember to fish out my keys. There are plenty of scenarios where it's a massive advantage to have and until I have a car stolen via relay, I'll consider it a huge win.
 

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Hope you never suffer arthritis. Wife finds electric handbrake brilliant. Essential on any car we buy now.
Agree with all of that!

My left thumb is pretty useless through arthritis and having driven with an EPB for over ten years, I would not consider reverting to any car not so equipped. Manual ratchet & pawl handbrakes are just so 20th century!:rolleyes:😁
 

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There has been a recent spate of stolen Kia Sportages reported in the London area facilitated it seems by thieves using keyless technology.

Just a warning I think if we needed it, that it's so important these days keeping your vehicle secure and keeping keys protected by Faraday pouches etc.

I haven't included the link but if anyone is interested in the source of my information visit the Facebook page for Kia Owners club UK.
This is such a well known issue that I have absolutely no sympathy with any idiot who can afford a £40.000 vehicle but doesn't have the nous to keep the key safe.

Anyone looking for Sympathy will find it in the dictionary between Symbolic and syphilis. That's if they know what a dictionary is!!!
 
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Not getting your fob out to do it is the point, you still press a button, albeit on the door.

If I leave football with the key in my trackies which are stuffed in my bag, I don't have to unpack in the rain or remember to fish out my keys. There are plenty of scenarios where it's a massive advantage to have and until I have a car stolen via relay, I'll consider it a huge win.
But, up until recently you did go key hunting and did remember to have it ready, I suspect?
But I'd guess you probably didn't say, "I wish manufacturers would provide a keyless entry facility on run of the mill cars" because you probably thought, "that would be a daft idea as criminals with a car stealing desire would be able to acquire my car more easily"
Hence why I say, Keyless entry fixes a problem that didn't really exist until the manufacturers used their "influence" to tell you it is problem.

Now auto open / close boot for example, many advantages to that especially when shopping with kids, disability issues (I include my wife in this category) and we'd definitely look for this on our next car

Electronic handbrake, again has its uses but hugely complex and expensive when it goes wrong when compared to a handle and a cable which has served us well for over 100 years. I suspect this is related to inbuilt obsolessence I've mentioned in other threads where there is a an electronic gizmo that often will fail at 8 - 10 years and make it uneconomic to repair the car so you look for another (and consequently manufacturers might get a sale)

But I think people forget (especially youngsters) that driving is a privilege and not a right.
To drive safely you should know how to do things like turn headlights on at the right time and not rely on auto headlights, wipers again you should know when to turn them on and not rely on auto wipers. You should be sensibe to not drive when tired so you shouldn't need lane drift assistance or "getting to close" auto braking etc.
And we've all seen the YouTube vids of folks driving into rivers as they blindly follow a sat nav.....whereas a driver shold know that the rather flooded track the sat nav is on about probably isnt a road

I know folks are going to say, many are "safety features" but if you were taught to drive properly you really wouldn't need these things, especially as cars are much better at braking / steering and generally doing what you ask nowadays.

I've been driving various vehicles both 2 and 4 wheeled privately and commercially since the 80's and it is evident that the standard of driving in the UK is much lower than it used to be and I suspect it's down to folks hoping the safety gizmo might save them rather than knowing how to drive correctly and not get in that situation in the first place.

As I said to my daughter when she passed her test, now the real learning begins as the driving instructor simply teaches you to pass the test. Learning to drive, takes a whole lot longer...........
 

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I am old now, and a retired firefighter. We were taught how to get into most cars because dickheads ALWAYS locked themselves out, and their kids in. We could get into most key operated doors without damage. Most notoriously, the half tennis ball method. If a thief could get in, then so could we and NOBODY would complain when we did. I suspect they can still do that using thief's methods but I'm out date on modern tech. Rest assured, THEY will have been trained. If you send for the AA or RAC and they say " I can't get you in", you'll be mightily pissed off. This also translates to your house. If we can get in, then so can they. Think about it!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Strange choice; burglars and drug dealers seem to prefer Golfs or Audi A3s (they must be as badge conscious as everyone else!). Roomy car though for all your swag, and those that are 4WD must be handy going across the fields...

Is there some particular weakness with the Sportage, I wonder?
Given the worldwide shortage of chips and apparent shortage of certain Kia parts, as well as the value of DPFs/catalytic converters, it probably just needs a good "fence" in the criminal fraternity to make this activity quite lucrative

You just need to price certain Kia components on second hand parts websites to see the sort of money which could be earned on a vehicle break up basis.
 

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This is such a well known issue that I have absolutely no sympathy with any idiot who can afford a £40.000 vehicle but doesn't have the nous to keep the key safe.

Anyone looking for Sympathy will find it in the dictionary between Symbolic and syphilis. That's if they know what a dictionary is!!!
Phew for a minute I thought I was going to have to take you to task for calling me an uneducated numpty, what a relief my car cost less than £40k so presumably I am exempt from such criticism.

Yes it is a well documented issue on forums such as this and there has even been some discussion in the broadsheets but this doesn't mean every car buyer is aware of it.

However, the truth is that many manufacturers, Kia included, continue to put their customers at risk of having their cars stolen by ignoring the need to provide 'go to sleep' key fobs. The manufacturers are fully aware that their cars can be easily broken into and the technology is available to overcome the issue but they just choose to ignore it.
 

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But, up until recently you did go key hunting and did remember to have it ready, I suspect?
Well obviously, or I didn't get in. The current situation is far better. Five years of better.
But I'd guess you probably didn't say, "I wish manufacturers would provide a keyless entry facility on run of the mill cars" No but when they offered it, I knew we were going to be best friends. Before, I was blind..... because you probably thought, "that would be a daft idea as criminals with a car stealing desire would be able to acquire my car more easily" Nope, theives will theive. If I was that bothered I'd bollard my drive or use a crooklock. As it is, I keep my keys away from the front of the house. Mostly.

Hence why I say, keyless entry fixes a problem that didn't really exist until the manufacturers used their "influence" to tell you it is problem. By that definition, chocolate hobnobs shouldn't exist. Plus I've explained the problem, you just choose to ignore it, as it doesn't fit your personal situation.
I heard the same arguments when people were jamming fobs in car parks. It basically boils down to, you're happy using a fob so everyone else should be. Would I pay extra for a sleep mode on the key, yes. Would I go back to dumb fobs, no thanks.
 

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I think allowing it to be disabled in car menu would be best to then allow those who don't want it to disable it. Probably could be added at a service software update.
 

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I think allowing it to be disabled in car menu would be best to then allow those who don't want it to disable it. Probably could be added at a service software update.
I fully agree, as it can be in other makes. Newer Kia's seem to come with sleeper fobs which go a long way to avoiding the problem when at home, maybe not so much when out and about.
 

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Keyless car theft: everything you need to know | heycar
https://heycar.co.uk › guides › which-cars-are-prone-to...


22 Mar 2022 — Keyless car theft (sometimes called relay theft) is a way of stealing a vehicle without using the physical keyfob. The targeted vehicles are ...

Prevent Keyless Car Theft (8 Quick Tips) & What Relay Theft is
https://www.locksmiths.co.uk › faq › keyless-car-theft


Keyless car theft (aka Relay Theft) is where the signal from a key for a so-called “Keyless entry” car is captured by somebody standing outside the victim's ...

Keyless Car Theft: What Is It and How Can It Be Prevented
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16 Mar 2021 — Keyless car theft, then, is when a thief accesses and steals your vehicle without possessing the original fob or card.

Keyless Car Crime: How To Thwart The Thieves - Forbes
https://www.forbes.com › advisor › car-insurance › key...


24 Mar 2022 — Keyless entry works by using a keyless fob that uses short-range radio waves. The fob transmits a signal which is picked up by a receiver in ...

Keyless theft | West Yorkshire Police
https://www.westyorkshire.police.uk › vehicle-crime


Keyless theft, also known as 'relay theft', occurs when device is used to fool the car into thinking the car's own remote key fob is close by; this unlocks the ...

How to avoid keyless car theft | Auto Express
https://www.autoexpress.co.uk › Features › Tips & advice


The way which thieves steal cars without the car keys - something that's also referred to as relay theft - is quite simply, although high-tech equipment is ...

Police warn of rise in keyless car thefts as CCTV shows ...
https://news.sky.com › story › police-warn-of-rise-in-ke...


Police chiefs are warning owners of keyless cars of a spike in thefts by criminals using mobile gadgets to copy their electronic codes.
22 Jul 2021 · Uploaded by Martin Brunt
 

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Like I say, same old story....



Discussed on a forum in 2010


If a theif wants your car, they will find a way.
 
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