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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone
I have had a Sportage K3 2L diesel (SatNav) for six months and am very pleased with it so far. I have a query, it is not a problem, but seems an odd one. To activate the steering wheel lock on the car, while the key is in the ignition and the engine is running, I have to turn the steering wheel 180 degrees round so the instruments on the wheel are upside down. Then I switch the engine off and remove the ignition key, slightly turning the steering wheel, and it then locks. If I turn the steering wheel so it is back in the upright position or to the left or right, it does not lock. All previous cars I have owned, no matter what position the steering wheel is in, they still lock.

Has anyone else come across this unusual way of putting the steering lock on - or is it just my car? There does not appear to be any information in my car manual about the steering lock. Or have I missed something?

 

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Its not something on any car ive ever been conscious of or particularly worried about. The only way cars can be stolen these days is with the keys hence the "2 in 1 burglaries" for car keys. Without the keys if they break a window and get into the car the alarm activates and if they try and turn the wheel the steering lock comes on. Im baffled why you feel the need to lock the wheel before you get out.
 

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It used to be advised that you should leave the steering lock locked - there was some tale about it being possible to turn the wheel violently and snap off the lock pin.
 

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Its a legacy from the old days when they could start your mark 2 escort with a lolly stick so the steering lock was last line of defence. These days the immobilisation defeats most opportunists, little point snapping the lock if you cant start it. These days you only need worry about theft if you have a top end golf, audi, fiat 500 or a defender!
 

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Tried to check my KX2 but the steering was so heavy I could not turn the wheel at all ˜„

Guess it locks somewhere ˜„
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Si952
The way to find out if you have a steering lock or not is to start the car up so that the engine is running and then turn the steering wheel to the upside down position. That way you will find it very easy to turn the wheel as it is not recommended to turn your wheel when the engine is not running, thus putting strain on your steering linkages. Once you have got the wheel in the upside down position, switch off the engine, take the key out of the ignition switch, then wiggle the wheel and see if it locks. If it doesn't, try other positions and do what I have said previously. If the steering does lock, put your key back in the iginition switch, turn the key and wiggle the wheel at the same time; this will unlock the steering lock. If you don't do this, it will not unlock.

Hope this has been helpful to you.

Regards

Storm
 

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I would think it will strain your steering linkages even more with the power of the power steering assist behind it - surely you should only turn the wheels when the vehicle is moving. That would make your test a bit difficul.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi everyone,
Seems like I've opened a can of worms regarding the steering lock. It appears that people don't use the steering lock. I have religiously used the lock on all my cars, including this one, and will continue to do so. The manufacturers put these locks in for a reason and as consumers we have to pay for these locks which is included in the price of the car. I have done some research and the police advise that the lock should be on when the car is unattended and this might be a grey area but I don't know how car insurance companies regard not having the steering lock on if it were stolen. I hope I am not sounding patronising as it is an indivual choice as to whether they use this facility or not. I do appreciate your comments.
Regards
Storm
 

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Why use the lock?
If a thief gets in, he will have to turn the wheel to take the car. Hence, he will ativate the lock on first bend he comes too.
If he has the key (from your house), the the steering lock will be useless an way etc.
From all the police programs i've seen, a steering wheel lock it practically useless, and is smashed in seconds.
The electronic immobiliser is the main security. Get round that and nothing else really matters.
 

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Well having done 31 years as a bobby I can say with authority that the question of a steering lock has never featured on any crime report I have completed, perhaps the fact that it was smashed off back in the 80s and 90s on the old Fords would have been highlighted in the report. I would refer back to my earlier comment in the thread.
Rather than wrenching on the steering and leaving all the linkages under load until you come back to it you would be better ensuring your house is secure, you dont leave your keys on show and even if you are in the back garden or upstairs you make sure you lock your house doors and dont become a "2 in 1" victim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi Ashton99
Regarding your comment about the immobiliser doing the whole job, to my knowledge I was always told the more obstacles you put infront of thieves, the better, hence slowing them down because thieves want to be in and out and gone. I get back to my previous thread why are car manufacturers still factory fitting steering locks in cars which us, as consumers, have to pay for? Also, the question arises with car insurance companies. If you make a claim and your car has been stolen and damaged and recovered by the police, would they ask the question of whether your factory fitted steering lock was on or not?

Regarding putting the steering lock on, I always leave my engine running. I can turn my steering wheel with one finger because it is electronic and not hydraulic which, to me, does not put any strain on the steering linkage. If it was the case that it put a strain on the steering linkage when unattended, car manufacturers would not fit these locks if it caused damage to your car.

Regards
Storm
 

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Turning the steering while the car is stationary is generally accepted as bad practice. It puts unnecessary strain on the steering linkages however it is powered... hydraulic, electric or muscles. Of allthemethods, it could be argued that hydraulic systems strain the least number of components.

Steering locks, or similar mechanicalimmobilisers, are required by legislation. Manufacturers have to fit them. You will fail your MoT if it is missing or doesn't work.

I don't think many people (you are the only one that I know of) actually bother to turn the wheel until the lock engages. The vast majority of people rely on a potential thief knowing that the lock will engage if he tries to steer the car.

I'm not saying it's wrong to do so though.

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Edited by: Techno
 

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Well we are certainly getting some mileage out of this steering lock thread. I never thought it would make page 2!
As above, it is certainly part of the MOT or it is for vehicles manufactured after 2001.
The only point I make is that the electronic immobiliser systems on cars now are so good that thieves find it far easier to commit burglary for the keys. Once you have the key it is irrelevant whether the steering wheel is actually locked.
Insurance companies never ask whether the lock had been actually engaged as it is again not relevent.
With regard to the strain on linkages, all power steering does is assist the movement of the rack, the forces acting upon the linkages are still the same you just dont feel them through the steering.
I wouldnt get hung up on it as I wrote earlier the greater risk is from someone snapping your UPVC door eurolocks and taking the keys off the kitchen worktop.
We have just had an incidence of this where a guy lost his 3 cars off his drive in one hit, Audi S4, Skoda Fabia RS and Beetle convertible. He opened his curtains and couldnt believe his eyes. The Eurolock on his UPVC door had been snapped and the keys taken off his conveniently placed key hanger next to the door
 
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