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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys,


I'm a first time Kia Owner with a Cee'd GS 1.6. The car was 2 years old when I bought it and had a couple of minor issues that are in the process of being fixed but one thing I'm not sure about is whether my steering lock is faulty or not.



The steering wheel only locks when it's at 90 degrees to 'straight ahead' (ie with the Kia logo at a right angle). Every other car I've driven has always locked when the wheels are dead straight ... is this normal in the Cee'd or should I report it to the dealer?



Many thanks in advance for any replies.



Dave
 

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Most steering locks will engage within a few degrees of almost any position so it seems there maybe a problem.
 

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It doesnt matter where the slot is, in your steering column that the lock pin drops into. There is a common misconception that you have to lock it every time. If the car is stationary you put a load on the column trying to find the slot. This is why you see people waggling the steering wheel when trying to turn the ignition on. The strain in the column is gripping the lock pin in its slot and waggling the wheel releases it. If you just take the key out, the lock pin will just drop to sit against the steering column shaft. If, god forbid someone hot wired the car and drove it, as soon as the steering wheel was turned, the slot would pass under the pin and the pin would drop in, locking the column. If the slot is at straight on, it leaves a locked vehicle perfectly ready to tow straight up on to a trailer or drop back truck. I dont know where the slot is in my 2010 SW because I've never sat there trying to find it. I just take the key out and guess what, my key always turns easily when I start up.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your replies guys. I've found a couple of other forums with people asking the same question about their Picancto so I must assume that this is by design rather than a fault.

Dowdeswell, whilst I understand what you're saying and your logic makes sense, my concern (although really academic since modern electronic immobilisers are more likely to prevent the vehicle being stolen than a mechanical lock) is that with a pin that hasn't yet engaged, a plate can be slid beneath this to prevent the pin engaging at all, where the pin is already engaged this isn't possible.

Dave
 

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Dave, don't be concerned, even academicaly for three reasons. One, the top bearing ring on the column stops a plate going in. Two, If there was some lowlife in there, they would be smashing the ingnition cluster off completely like theyre taught in borstal. And finally, don't take this wrong, I love mine to bits and I've discussed it with the lads at work, but who's going to knick a ceed any way?
 
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