Kia Owners Club Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had problems in the recent snow fall where my Sportage 1.7 2016 would not pull uphill in the snow, feeling as if it had lost power. Any ideas what I’m doing wrong?
 

·
Registered
2020 Sportage GT-Line CRDi
Joined
·
1,435 Posts
I had problems in the recent snow fall where my Sportage 1.7 2016 would not pull uphill in the snow, feeling as if it had lost power. Any ideas what I’m doing wrong?
The tyres on your car are probably not the most suitable for snow, as a consequence you will be losing grip. Snow conditions also need a dramatic change in driving style. Try changing gear much earlier than you normally would and very light foot on the accelerator. If you car has AWD this is a good time to use the 4WD Lock button, but keep you acceleration as low as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,669 Posts
The tyres on your car are probably not the most suitable for snow, as a consequence you will be losing grip. Snow conditions also need a dramatic change in driving style. Try changing gear much earlier than you normally would and very light foot on the accelerator. If you car has AWD this is a good time to use the 4WD Lock button, but keep you acceleration as low as possible.
The best driving aid for snow work is your right foot.
Do everything smooooooothly! Stay off the brakes and throttle as much as possible - a freewheeling tyre has more grip than one which is either braking or being driven. And keep the front wheels pointing where you actually want to go, never mind which way the car is pointing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,229 Posts
I had problems in the recent snow fall where my Sportage 1.7 2016 would not pull uphill in the snow, feeling as if it had lost power. Any ideas what I’m doing wrong?

You need to understand several things about the way your car works. As mentioned by others, when grip is low a very gentle right foot is needed. Too much wellie and the wheels just spin up and give very little grip. Maximum grip is when the wheels are not slipping at all. If yours is a manual you could try pulling away in 2nd gear (less torque at the wheels) veeeery gently.

If yours has AWD then this will automatically apply power to the rears when the fronts lose grip, but it might be better to turn on the 4WD lock so all four wheels are driven from the off. Remember to turn it off when normal grip is available. With 4WD lock on the car becomes very tail waggy so be ready for this.

Traction control is also a factor. If the car detects excessive slip then it will back off the throttle and this is probably why you felt the lack of accelerator response. When the wheel spin is stopped it is quite slow to restore normal accelerator response. The system is somewhat crude and does not give best performance in very slippery conditions (more sophisticated systems achieve TC by selectively braking the slipping wheel or wheels) I have found I can get better control if I turn the TC off when it is very slippery.

As also mentioned keep the front wheels pointing in the direction you want the car to go. When the car gets a little out of shape react very quickly on the steering and back off a little on the throttle. For me I find that I need to exaggerate the steering input to control any sideways slip and looking at videos of cars sliding it seems that many drivers use too little steering when sliding. On normal roads also be aware of the camber (side slope) If wheels are excessively spinning then the car will move sideways down the slope and this is usually towards a ditch.

It is hard work and requires great concentration to correct every little departure from controlled movement, but gentle will achieve far better results than wellie. If you can fins a large empty space with no obstructions then it is a good thing to go and have a (slow) play on it so you get a feel for how teh car behaves and how to correct it. This does not need to be fast. Beware of kerbs etc hidden under snow in car parks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
I had problems in the recent snow fall where my Sportage 1.7 2016 would not pull uphill in the snow, feeling as if it had lost power. Any ideas what I’m doing wrong?
Can tell you exactly what happened. When the ECU in your car noticed that the front wheels were rotating faster than the rears it cut back engine power (some apply a bit of brake via the ABS as well) to stop them spinning, in some circumstances it virtually stops or even totally stops the car. My old BMW had a button on the dash. Pulling away in snow you were advised to give the button a short press which would allow a limited amount of wheel spin when pulling away and other tricky snow conditions. Once safely moving a quick tap put it back to normal. I never failed to get down our untreated/unploughed street no matter how bad it was, in that setting it just kept moving.

In the wifes Skoda Fabia you have to go into the car menu to deactivate the relevant setting, far easier to tap a button but without doing that the car will not move uphill.

Have a read of the manual, it will be in there.

As for "If yours has AWD then this will automatically apply power to the rears when the fronts lose grip," pretty sure no Sportage 1.7's have had AWD fitted thus irrelevant
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,229 Posts
<snip>

As for "If yours has AWD then this will automatically apply power to the rears when the fronts lose grip," pretty sure no Sportage 1.7's have had AWD fitted thus irrelevant
I honestly don't know and I don't care either. Not irrelevant to those folk who read this thread and DO have AWD. This forum is not onoy about helping the OP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
963 Posts
I honestly don't know and I don't care either. Not irrelevant to those folk who read this thread and DO have AWD. This forum is not onoy about helping the OP.
I honestly thought that when we respond to a thread its helpful to make it relevant to the OP's question. That is what I tried to do in my answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,229 Posts
I gave the OP good advice, some of which may or may not apply to his vehicle and certainly some of it will be useful. I gave a more complete reply for the possible benefit of others. Is this a problem for you?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
I had problems in the recent snow fall where my Sportage 1.7 2016 would not pull uphill in the snow, feeling as if it had lost power. Any ideas what I’m doing wrong?
Switch off traction control.
 
  • Like
Reactions: lolgeoff

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
Simple really - DO NOT USE YOUR CAR IN SNOW OR ICE WITH INAPPROPRIATE TYRES.
In other northern European countries it's actually illegal to run summer tyres in winter conditions - and with good reason. Yet our government for some reason deems it acceptable to allow people to go out on the roads, crash & kill people rather than mandate that it's appropriate tyres or stay home.

Unless you have all season, winter, M&S (or chains/studs) tyres then please, use your noddle, stay at home. Summer tyres are deathtraps in snow / ice conditions. Don't be fooled by thinking that AWD somehow magically compensates for this - as it really doesn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
Simple really - DO NOT USE YOUR CAR IN SNOW OR ICE WITH INAPPROPRIATE TYRES.
In other northern European countries it's actually illegal to run summer tyres in winter conditions - and with good reason. Yet our government for some reason deems it acceptable to allow people to go out on the roads, crash & kill people rather than mandate that it's appropriate tyres or stay home.

Unless you have all season, winter, M&S (or chains/studs) tyres then please, use your noddle, stay at home. Summer tyres are deathtraps in snow / ice conditions. Don't be fooled by thinking that AWD somehow magically compensates for this - as it really doesn't.
I think you're being overly dramatic. Our road (inclined) is covered in snow. I've watched countless neighbours and delivery drivers, over the last few days, navigate without a problem. Even the pizza delivery made it up okay last night after the freeze had started.

I know common sense isn't a thing anymore but that's what it comes down to. I agree stay in unless necessary but to say you can't drive in snow on all weather/summer tyres is over the top. Not everyone is fortunate enough to be able to purchase a full set of spare wheels for the 3>5 days of light snow that this country generally gets each year. This relates to the general conditions on housing estates, not navigating the pennines etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,229 Posts
Agree with ArthutCollins2. I have been driving various cars for more than 45 years in all weathers and I have never fitted Winter tyres. Never had a problem I could not handle either. The law deems ordinary tyres to be appropriate in this country in winter. While I agree that winter tyres are probably better in low temps this is really only an issue for those seeking ultimate performance, and then you will find that nearly everyone else is on summer tyres so you can't go faster than them anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
"I regret buying all-weather / winter tyres" < said nobody ever.

You don't need to have a 2nd set of tyres - just fit all-season tyres and really that should be what everyone runs unless they can afford & have space to store two sets of wheels/tyres.

Once you have driven winter tyres in the snow you would honestly NEVER drive on summer tyres in the white stuff ever again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
"I regret buying all-weather / winter tyres" < said nobody ever.

You don't need to have a 2nd set of tyres - just fit all-season tyres and really that should be what everyone runs unless they can afford & have space to store two sets of wheels/tyres.

Once you have driven winter tyres in the snow you would honestly NEVER drive on summer tyres in the white stuff ever again.
It's a trade off. I could fit all season tyres to my gt and benefit for two weeks of the year but suffer for 50 weeks. Or I can have a superior and safer level of grip for 50 weeks of the year and go careful for two.

Your usage scenario doesn't fit my situation. On your advice my car would be less safe for the vast majority of year.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,312 Posts
Simple really - DO NOT USE YOUR CAR IN SNOW OR ICE WITH INAPPROPRIATE TYRES.
In other northern European countries it's actually illegal to run summer tyres in winter conditions - and with good reason. Yet our government for some reason deems it acceptable to allow people to go out on the roads, crash & kill people rather than mandate that it's appropriate tyres or stay home.
Given we have had a total of 4 days where there has been snow on the road this year, and that is our side street, not the main road, and even less in the last few years.
It is not realistic to mandate that in certain months you have to run winter tyres. Unlike other countries where they get months of the stuff.

Plenty of people drive safely with normal road tyres. It's just the idiots that have no idea how to drive in snow that are the issue. Too close, too fast and no concept that you need to wait till other drivers have got up/down a hill before trying yourself...
Then wonder why halfway up and having to stop they can't get going again, or stop when going down hill....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
We may only get 4 days of snow but it only needs 10 mins of the stuff to kill someone.
And if we only get 4 days of snow then that's 4 days where, if you have summer tyres, you simply decide NOT TO USE THE CAR - simple as that.

Would you say I don't drink 364 days a year and am good to drive but the one day I down 10 pints and half a bottle of scotch it's still ok to drive as - ah well, it's only one day a year.
No because that's stupid and asking for trouble. But I could probably down 10 pints & half a bottle of whiskey and not crash so that's ok then? But I might - am I just unlucky? No I'm being an idiot getting behind the wheel in a totally inappropriate state. A bit like jumping in a car and driving it on snow/ice with tyres that cannot cope...

Spot the similarity?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
605 Posts
We may only get 4 days of snow but it only needs 10 mins of the stuff to kill someone.
And if we only get 4 days of snow then that's 4 days where, if you have summer tyres, you simply decide NOT TO USE THE CAR - simple as that.

Would you say I don't drink 364 days a year and am good to drive but the one day I down 10 pints and half a bottle of scotch it's still ok to drive as - ah well, it's only one day a year.
No because that's stupid and asking for trouble. But I could probably down 10 pints & half a bottle of whiskey and not crash so that's ok then? But I might - am I just unlucky? No I'm being an idiot getting behind the wheel in a totally inappropriate state. A bit like jumping in a car and driving it on snow/ice with tyres that cannot cope...

Spot the similarity?
Not really, one is a self induced state of massively impaired ability, the other is a change of environmental conditions requiring a different set of skills to complete a successful journey. I don't stay at home when it rains because aquaplaning could be deadly.

The main factor in any driving situation is the driver. Driving wasted takes away your ability to think or react properly, safe arrival would be based on luck. Driving in snow simply changes the decisions you need to make but your ability to make them remains.

Regardless, real life proves you wrong. The whole country has had snow for days yet no rash of stories proclaiming death by snow. A good few prangs maybe. By all means fit all season or winter tyres, good for you and for your passengers. Just don't shout that snow+summer tyres=death.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,312 Posts
We may only get 4 days of snow but it only needs 10 mins of the stuff to kill someone.
And if we only get 4 days of snow then that's 4 days where, if you have summer tyres, you simply decide NOT TO USE THE CAR - simple as that.

Would you say I don't drink 364 days a year and am good to drive but the one day I down 10 pints and half a bottle of scotch it's still ok to drive as - ah well, it's only one day a year.
No because that's stupid and asking for trouble. But I could probably down 10 pints & half a bottle of whiskey and not crash so that's ok then? But I might - am I just unlucky? No I'm being an idiot getting behind the wheel in a totally inappropriate state. A bit like jumping in a car and driving it on snow/ice with tyres that cannot cope...

Spot the similarity?

Not really. Drinking impairs your judgement and reaction times. Snow does not.

As plenty of people manage to drive safely on summer tyres in snow, without killing anyone. As I said it's the idiots that are the issue. Then again idiots drink & drive.
Having summer tyres never stopped me from driving in heavy snow, been all over the dales in it as well, when younger. I have never killed anyone or even had a crash in it.
Even on winter tyres people still crash. It's as much about the driver as the rubber.

Yes all-weather or winter tyres give better grip when driven in the correct way. But do not stop you from getting stuck or sliding in to anything. But when you live in a city what is the point?
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top