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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello lads, I'm trying to change the exhaust muffler and ran into trouble. Both bolts were a bit rusty and stuck from all the heat I guess so took the time to use wd40 and try to loosen them over the course of 3-4 hours. Used a manual wrench at first, they wouldn't flinch, more wd40 and an impact wrench did the trick on one of them, but the other is stubborn. So more wd40, induction heating with a gun, impact wrench and the bolt started rolling in place (i'm not a native english speaker, the expression doesn't come to mind, sorry). I don't know how the engineers designed this. I then used a parrot? plier to squeeze onto the flat end and try to loosen it manually or with the impact wrench, but it kept spinninh in place under it. I feel like running out of options, anyone who replaced it please help. Thanks
 

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Angle grinder or oxy torch and cut it off. Replace with new bolt.

Or MIG weld the back of it to hold it in place. still might snap depends on how seized it might be.
 

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please help.
Mechanics and pik....cat thieves :rolleyes: come up against that kind of problem frequently. It's no more than a nuisance in a vehicle repair workshop but if you are doing this job in your garage, on your driveway or in the street, it can be challenging.

Post #2 from 'Dubs' offers a couple of practical solutions if you have the necessary equipment. Otherwise, you could seek the help of a mobile mechanic who will probably have access to the necessary equipment.

If access for an angle grinder is tight, then a 'Dremel'-type multi-tool with the right cutting or grinding accessory might be easier.

Good luck with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Mechanics and pik....cat thieves :rolleyes: come up against that kind of problem frequently. It's no more than a nuisance in a vehicle repair workshop but if you are doing this job in your garage, on your driveway or in the street, it can be challenging.

Post #2 from 'Dubs' offers a couple of practical solutions if you have the necessary equipment. Otherwise, you could seek the help of a mobile mechanic who will probably have access to the necessary equipment.

If access for an angle grinder is tight, then a 'Dremel'-type multi-tool with the right cutting or grinding accessory might be easier.

Good luck with it.
I only had temporary acces over the weekend to those tools at someone's shop. I only have a drill and ratchet wrench set at home, no welder. Plus the space is very limited as i'll be under the car. Either get a drill attachment that i can use to grind the back of it or just go to a shop it seems these are the only options?
 

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I have sometimes cut rusty nuts off using a small hacksaw with a new blade,sometimes I have just cut the threaded end of the bolt off and then used a file to remove the rest of the rusty bolt thread at which point the nut would usually start turning.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The space is very limited for this operation. Anyone knows the exact size of the bolt/nut so i can buy a pair before cutting it off? Thanks
 

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I've used a Dremel with a cutting disc on before now to cut seized bolts. The last time was the very difficult to access anti roll bar links on my Spitfire where only the Dremel could get access. It took a couple of discs but easily did the job. Good luck with it.
 

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If space is limited on the side that has smoothed over, an alterative would be to get a nut splitting tool, and remove it that way.
Teng NS02 Nut Splitter 2pc Set 5020385080478 | eBay

As for the replacement, you can usually gauge this on the size of the nut that is already on as replacement nuts/bolts should be standard size, eg M8, M10 etc and not too expensive.
Try to find a nut that goes onto the current bolt will help with finding the correct size nut/bolt before you start removing everything.
 

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get a nut splitting tool, and remove it that way.
Nut splitters can be useful if the target nut is accessible for the application of lots of muscle but I distinctly remember having a couple of them break before actually splitting the nut. That would have been around 1960, off the top of my head so it's not clever new technology. My 'Dremel' would be my preferred option - one of my favourite go-to tools for a huge variety of tasks, especially when space is at a premium.
 

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