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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I was under the car this week finding the errant stone in the fuel line protector I noticed my engine oil sump gasket weaping. Mainly along the rear edge. Not enough to create a leak on the floor or even a drip but enough that you can see a moist oil "film" along the outside edge of the gasket (where it sort of "squashes" out just from the edge of the pan.

I was a little bit surprised to see this as I would have thought four years is a bit young even for some weeping to occur. Then again some googling suggests it might just be normal and not to worry.

But I did find a four year old thread on this very website where a Picanto owner found his pan leaking due to an actual stripped bolt - apparently that car was near new at the time.

Now THAT would have me worried. So I was planning on the next oil change to merely drain the oil, then do nothing at all other than carefully un-torque and re-torque each of the sump bolts to check if any are actually stripped. If that was the case I would stop there and then, put the drained oil back in and take it to Kia to fix (since that would be something I woul want to go on the official Kia records given you either have to ream a bigger thread or repair the original one with a helicoil or a thread repair compound.

Hopefully I am worrying about nothing. I wasn't really worried at all till I read of the prospect of a stripped bolt but I would have thought if one was stripped, the car would have leaked more and much earlier in its life...and not after four years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I was sufficiently worried to put the car up on tne ramp tonight and check them all. They were factory tightened to around 18 Nm versus the maximum 11.8 according to the service manual. I swear these car makers have two torque charts. One for when the car is actually in service and another (much higher) at the factory. Every bolt I have ever undone on a new car is much tighter than the service manua specs.

Anyway, without pulling them completely out I just undid them about a third the way and back in again. All seemed OK. So I guess the gasket just needs renewing.

Looking further up the engine I see the same gasket material between the crank case and cylinder block so I hope this is not contagious! :rolleyes:
 

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I'm glad it was ok (as in not stripped), but 4 years does seem young for weeping.
Has this had any impact on oil consumption/oil level ?
I can't get ours up high enough to take a look but i'll keep a look out for any oil spots etc (although you said yours didn't actually drip).
I'll check my oil at the weekend..
 

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Some car brands seem to leak and some never leak. You should get your dealer to fix it, not because it is a big issue or danger just now but because it may get worse and then fail any MOT equivalent test later on, or may just make an irritating mess under the car that attracts dust and dirt. Some cars that leak may have an inadequate gasket design so that a liquid sealant is better, however your dealer should have experience of what works best on your sump.
For a liquid sealant to work best the car should sit overnight with the sump off so that the sealing surfaces can be cleaned completely free of oil without oil residue mixing with the sealant.

When it comes to the torque that the bolts were installed with, it's not really possible to ascertain make up torque just by measuring the torque required to break out and loosen the screws. There will always be extra friction years later like they are glued in place. The bolts may have had a liquid thread locking compound applied during installation, in which case they will be less secure now after the partial back out and re-tightening.
I'm pretty sure that the "nut runners" used in the assembly process would be frequently calibrated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm glad it was ok (as in not stripped), but 4 years does seem young for weeping.
Has this had any impact on oil consumption/oil level ?
I can't get ours up high enough to take a look but i'll keep a look out for any oil spots etc (although you said yours didn't actually drip).
I'll check my oil at the weekend..
No, none at all. Nothing has ever dripped - it is just you see a fine, light film of oil on the edges of the gasket. No changes at all to consumption either (it does not use any or to be more precise, I never have to fill it between oil changes and the level on the dipstick never changes).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There will always be extra friction years later like they are glued in place. The bolts may have had a liquid thread locking compound applied during installation, in which case they will be less secure now after the partial back out and re-tightening.
I'm pretty sure that the "nut runners" used in the assembly process would be frequently calibrated.
Yep, I take your point about them feeling more torqued from age. The gasket Kia uses for sumps is always an RTV one and looks ostensibly identical to the black Permatex stuff. I may actually just leave it for the moment since googling around suggests that very light weeping without being able to actually wipe "liquid" oil from anywhere is not a big issue - just something to keep watch over. I would actually be hesitant though to get a dealer to do it though because of the time factor. To really do it properly takes a lot of time to thoroughly clean and prepare the surfaces and to allow the RTV to properly cure before refilling. But a dealer would want the car in and out within a couple of hours. Would much prefer the leisure of working to my own timetable knowing the job was done perfectly even if it took a few days. I would only have hassled a dealer if the bolts had been over torqued to the point of damaging threads and that does not appear to be the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I actually did decide to fix this. It was worrying me a bit since I did not wish for it to develop into a full blown leak. Was actually a much harder and involved job that I thought it might have been but really only because the working space underneath a Picanto is minimal even compared to a Rio. This made using the tool to separate the pan from the bottom of the crankcase very slow work as I simply could not get really decent "blows" with the plastic hammer (and don't even think of trying the rubber mallet trick - that OEM gasket is tough as nails). So it was just very slow, patient going till I had separated enough of the contact area to be able to then pry the rest of it lose. Luckily this is the sort of job that you might only have to do every decade or so normally.

I couldn't really see any obvious reason for the weeping so can really only conclude that the stuff they use at the factory is obviously fast setting stuff that just might not be as good as the slow setting stuff. And it is probably put on by humans so there is variability there too. So I just went ahead and thoroughly cleaned it all up with gasket remover spray (which I painted on rather than sprayed) then used a 4mm bead width of Permatex Ultra Black as the gasket (and followed the official Kia service manual for the bead pattern on the sump which states the bead goes on the inside of the bolt holes and NO bead on the outside of them. Gave it about 42 hours to cure since we are headed into cold weather down here and I did not want to rush to the end of the job given I had already taken two days to get that far! 24 hours probably would have been enough though as per the instructions from Permatex.

Anyway zero leaks and zero weeping now so I hope it stays that way especially since from next year the car may be sitting on the concrete driveway which would love to permanently absorb engine oil!
 
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