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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Has anyone tried to cancel out the terrible road noise from the pro ceed. Might just be mine but it's awful. I'm doing a deep clean on mine (removing seats etc and wanted to see if anyone has taking the carpet up and tried to sound proof the cabin a bit more.

If anyone has, did it make a difference? What did you use?

Thanks

Chris
 

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Hi

There is some noise that could be
reduced. Before Kia Pro Ceed I had a 2003 Citroen C5 and the car was super
quiet compared with Kia Pro Ceed. However, what I know is that the C5 had a lot
of insulation on the car's body. You could not see any bare metal there.

Just lift the boot liner in Kia Pro Ceed
and what you can see is bare metal body of the car. Obviously that contributes
to causing some noise. Especially when driving over 60 mph.

Another issue in Kia Pro Ceed, in my
point of few, is the 17inch size of wheels and tyres. Bigger tyres = more
noise.

There are few things to consider:

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Change the wheels to 16 inch. I
did that and already lots of noise has gone. (changing the tyres only did not
help much, the one size less make significant difference not only in less noise
but the driving is much more comfortable, look at my other post about this)

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To insulate the bare body of
the car to reduce any unnecessary noise

In terms of the wheel size and tyres
this is fairly simple to do. It also depends on individual preferences.

In relation to the ""˜sound proofing' the
car, this is more complicated job to do.

There are lots of different opinions
about this. Some people states that using some sound deadening mats do help,
others states that it does not help.

In my opinion it might help if this is
done properly and according to some simple physics (if you remember some from
school J)

I have not insulated my Kia Pro Ceed yet
but I am going to do it.



Material that I bought for this:

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Silent Coat 30 x Tiles https://www.amazon.co.uk/Silent-Coat-187x265mm-Deadening-Proofing/dp/B00NVE013I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492800416&sr=8-1&keywords=silent+coat

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12 Sheets Car Van Sound
Proofing Deadening Insulation Closed Cell Foam 10mm http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12-Sheets-Car-Van-Sound-Proofing-Deadening-Insulation-Closed-Cell-Foam-10mm-/161242282434

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Blue Handle Car Auto Sound
Deadening Rubber Roller Wheel 3 x 3.5 cm UK http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Blue-Handle-Car-Auto-Sound-Deadening-Rubber-Roller-Wheel-3-x-3-5-cm-UK-/281938483220?hash=item41a4d7d814:g:SUUAAOSwKtVWxLoS

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12pcs Car Radio Door Clip Panel
Trim Audio Removal Pry Repairing Tool Kit Plastic https://www.amazon.co.uk/Vktech%C2%AE-12pcs-Removal-Repairing-Plastic/dp/B00D83FM8G/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1492801387&sr=8-2&keywords=car+clip+removing+tools

When searching the topic on internet I
found opinions that insulating a car does not help. In my view it might not
help if someone uses only the aluminium layered sound deadening mats (like
silent coat type). It only prevents the metal parts from vibrating. It does not
block much noise from outside to inside of the car.

For this reason, another layer of either
closed cell foam or another blocking sound material must be put on top of the
silent coat. Only this might reduce the noise.

Obviously, there are lots of different
elements that do contribute to the road noise and to eliminate this would be
unreasonable compared with the cost, added weight to the car, difficult to
reach places etc.

I am going to insulate my Kia Pro Ceed
very soon. Mainly in the boot area, the spare wheel well, rear wheel archers
and under the rear seat. Those are fairly easy to access places.Doors could also be insulated. However, I am not going to do it as the Kia Pro Ceed's doors are already very heavy and adding any more weight might not be the best idea.

I will update this post after completing
the job ""“ I do not solely rely on others' opinion. I will insulate the care my
way and see how it works.















Edited by: Montrix
 

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Hi

So far I managed to insulate the rear hatch only as I had limited time last weekend.

I must say that the job is quick to complete and with the right tools should take not longer than one hour. Depends how detailed and meticulous you want to be with the 'sound proofing'.



On the photo you can see the inner plastic trim that needs to be taken off from the hatch door. It is easy to do. There are only two screws. The rest is holding on the yellow clips. It is best to use some plastic leavers when removing the trim. Be careful not to damage the clips or the trim.

Next clean the metal surface with any white spirit or turpentine. Cleaning the surface makes easier to apply any 'sound proofing' sheets that you have.

I applied the silent coat followed by 10mm closed cell foam.



Unfortunately I did forget to take a photograph of the completed job. I was in a hurry so i've just put the plastic trim back. Will provide a photo soon.

How it works: to be honest I did not expect much improvement by just sound proofing the rear hatch door.
Surprisingly It did make a lot of difference already:
<ul>[*]the empty or hollow sound has gone when closing the rear hatch
[*]the rear hatch closes better (and are slightly heavier but not much really)[*]most surprisingly - it is quieter in the cabin when driving on motorway or standard roads. Of course do not expect total silence, but I can honestly say it is better.
[*]there is less vibration from the rear hatch when driving on bad roads, and less noise of course
[/list]

I look forward to sound proofing the spare wheel area, the boot, wheel archers and under the rear seat.









Edited by: Montrix
 

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Well, yeas and no. I am not that fussy about some reasonable road noise. I just want to have a comfortable ride as I do drive 35 miles to work each day. (it is 70 miles both ways).

With too much unnecessary road noise one might get a headache :)

Potentially I might only put the 'silent coat' and the foam on the boot floor and under the back seat.
Taking off the wheel archers is a bit of a project - yes. I am not sure if I want to be bothered with this.

Having said that I do have another project to complete - converting the car to LPG powered.

It will be done very soon and I am going to provide photographs of the LPG installed.

I had my previous car powered by LPG and I am totally convinced to it. At least 50% saving on petrol. Actually I bought the Kia Pro Ceed 1.6 as the engine is particularly suitable and easy for converting to LPG.
It is of course completely new topic that I will be posting about.

Thank you all for reading my posts and contributing to the forum. Very helpful forum :)


Edited by: Montrix
 

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I'm really satisfied with traffic noise reduction fences. The configuration or layout of the traffic noise reduction fences relative to the associated noise source is a key factor in achieving the required noise reduction. There are two simple principles. The first is through the correct positioning of the barrier to maximize the sound shadow caused by the sound. The second is that at a lower frequency, the performance of any obstacle is always significantly reduced.
 

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You can try traffic noise reduction fences, Iron fence are often used for traffic control. They are very good for keeping the public out of danger, but they do not reduce noise. This traffic noise reduction fences are mainly made of a mass layer and a well-designed sound-absorbing layer. These not only can reduce the direct spread of sound, but also reflect the sound back, so as to improve the overall performance.
 
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