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I bought my wife a 2002 Kia Rio LX 1.3 as a runaround about 14 months ago. It's been a paragon of virtue and, as my Rover 400 diesel was becoming problematic and spares are hard to come by, I px'd it for a 2004 Rio 1.3 LX which I pick up (from a Main Agent) on Friday. I realise that a Haynes Manual hasn't been produced and I do like to do the odd bit of basic home maintenance. Changing the spark plugs myself would be one of those tasks.
In anticipation, I've just bought a set of EON2 702 plugs (recommended to fit the Rio) which have a pre-set gap of .85mm. Can anyone advise whether it would be wise to fit these and what are the normally recommended plugs and gaps.

Also, is there a maintenance download I can access?

Thanks
 

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I would not use Champion plugs if you gave me them for nowt. Go for NGK BPR5EY if your engine is a 1.3.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Davy. That's very clear. I will be taking your advice
I had heard that Champion are not necessarily the best plugs on the market!!!!
 

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I've used Champion in motorcycles and cars in the past and found they wear out far quicker than NGK or DENSO plugs. Thats why I dont use use them anymore or recommend them to anyone.
 

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I think the gap is meant to be between 0.8 and 0.9 mm, it's in the hand book that comes with the car. Don't have mine to hand at the moment though.


If you've never changed plugs before...



Be careful when taking the plugs out that you do not strip the thread in the cylinder head!

I normally take the plugs out when the engine is cold, while being careful not to let any debris fall into the cylinders. When you put the new one in, start off JUST with your fingers! Feel it go squarely and smoothly into the thread until finger tight. Watch it as it tightens to make sure it is straight. Do not use grease or WD40 on the thread. Then use the tool to tighten the plug, but DO NOT over tighten. Wipe the top of the plug so that it is spotlessly clean, squirt a bit of WD40 into the cap of the correct ignition lead and snap it onto the plug.



One other thing, when you do the plugs on this car, make sure you don't knock the oxygen sensor cable into the cooling fan! It's easily done as it's not secured well in place.
 

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taking plugs out when cold you stand a good chance of having problems if they have been overtightened previously. I have always removed them when hot, been doing it for 30 yrs never stripped one yet.
 

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More chance of burning yourself when the engine is hot. Also the different metals (alloy head, stainless plug)expand differently as they warm up. Then you are putting a new cold plug into a hot head...it's asking for trouble.


I would suggest trying to remove a plug when cold, but if it's really tight and you can't get it loose without breaking something, then try it with the engine warmed up.
 
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