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Discussion Starter #1
Hi. I have a 16 plate Kia Sportage GT. Im getting my dad to change the brake pads, but I was wondering if this model needs a rewind tool for it. Thought I best check before he starts.
 

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They are only used on rear discs as far as I'm aware so if you are changing the front pads it won't be an issue
 

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Your handbrake should work on a drum therefore no rewind tool should be needed. Wind backs are required when hand brake works on the discs as they self adjust as the pads wear.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ok, seems I have disks all round but is there a drum behind the disk, sorry not clueless here but I am bike minded rather than cars, thanks in advance
 

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Have had success using a pair of long nose players to twist the piston back in. Laser tools do a simple tool shaped like a cube with different spaced pins on each side. 3/8th drive. Halfords have them at £6.99 and they are open at the moment.
 

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The video was painful to the extreme. Should have used the impact driver on the screw first time. That was bound to rip out the X head.before you take the hub/disc off you should use the adjuster to back off the shoes via the access hole. He used the worlds supply of brake cleaner whereas if he had cleaned them on the bench he would have used a lot less. Hubs and faces should all be de rusted with wire brush and emery. Litle bit of copper grease to stop the wheel sticking to the hub. Where the shims fit should all be cleaned and the crud taken out with a file as the rust moves the shims which grips the pads causing sticking and premature wear. The caliper slides should be checked cleaned and silicon greased. They do seize and cause issues
He then tightens up the mounting bolts by hand and finishes with the air rachet. Even if you dont use a torque wrench they are not that tight, could of finished it by hand. Never adjusted the brake shoes back up.
Not a good example but gives some idea of the process.
This guy is better:

You don't need a wind back tool as long as you have some grips that can push the piston back. If you are doing all the brakes check your master cylinder for fluid spill you may need to remove some fluid.
 

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If you're motorbike minded, then the agricultural and very basic set up of cars will be easy and possibly a shock to you as well.
The Brembo brakes on my Aprilia RSV and Suzuki GSXR are far fancier than anything you'll see on any mainstream car short of a Ferrari.
Opposed pistons, quick release pads etc.
I'm doing the front pads on our Sportage as soon as this cold spell goes away.
One thing I'd day is that when you apply grease to the back of the pads, don't use copper grease - it's old school practice and there are better products out there.
I use pad specific grease like 'PAD GOO' (made by Bremtech).
 

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FWIW, Pagid (huge OE supplier of brakes) have a PDF of why copper grease should NOT be used on brakes.
If you google 'Pagid copper grease' the first hit should be the PDF.
 

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... Just read the pagid document. All DIY ers should take a look. Summerized, galvanic corrosion will occur, the brake parts, caliper for ex, will become an anode. I'll be logging on to ebay to buy some cera-tec brake grease later today.
 
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