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I recently bought a 2019 kia proceed gt with the 7 speed DCT transmission, this is the first auto i have had and I love it to bits!

I have read a few things about DCT not being very reliable. Has anyone had any issues with there's? My car also has the temp gauge for the transmission, what sort of temp should it be at? Last question how do the DCT transmissions cope im warm weather, im only in the UK so won't be too hot but just curious. Thanks evreyone
 

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I have read a few things about DCT not being very reliable. Has anyone had any issues with there's?
There is a learning curve required in order to get the best from DCT because it is different from the traditional torque convertor 'slush 'boxes that have been around forever. Personally, it ticks all the boxes for me but from time to time in these pages certain individuals pop up condemning DCT.

If one takes the time to understand the behaviour of DCT, recognising that it performs differently from traditional auto boxes, and learns to take advantage of its amazingly quick changes while enjoying fuel economy similar to a manual gearbox version, one comes to appreciate why it is a hugely popular way to enjoy two-pedal motoring.

Having the additional ability to cycle through the gears manually if the notion takes you, either by tapping on the selector or by using the paddles allows drivers to choose a different gear from that selected by the box. For me, 95%+ of the time, the box is best left to its own devices but I do intervene occasionally, just because I can.:)

Those who whinge about Hyundai/KIA DCT always seem to erroneously make comparisons to manual transmissions or to torque convertor autos but most of the complaints investigated by the manufacturers concluded that lack of driver understanding and/or unrealistic expectations of the transmission were the problem rather than any inherent flaw in DCT.

I'm confident that the majority of converts to DCT, a massive majority possibly, would choose a DCT option every time thereafter.
 

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I'm confident that the majority of converts to DCT, a massive majority possibly, would choose a DCT option every time thereafter.
Having owned manual boxes for decades, and then a 9 speed full auto, I have now owned a DCT Sportage for 3-4 months now. I wouldn't presume to claim that I have fully learnt it yet , but I certainly see nothing wrong with it. I think about my gear changes a fraction earlier than before and all is well. So far I love it.


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I have driven automatics for the past 30 years or more. My first DCT was a 6-speed Cee'd 1.6 petrol, which I bought in 2017, and apart from a sticky valve which was fixed under warranty, I had no problems in some three years, driving around 17,000 miles. I now have a Niro HEV with a similar transmission and that now has a little under 6,000 faultless miles on the clock. Don't abuse the transmission (especially the clutches - they are friction material like a manual, not a fluid coupling) and think just that little bit further ahead to allow the transmission to be in the correct gear.
 

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I don't think you'll have any worries about the reliability of the KIA/Hyundai DCT; they don't beta test their products on the buying public unlike certain German companies I could mention! And you have a nice long warranty, again, unlike all those German companies...

That said, it is possible to ruin the clutches in DCT just like in a manual gearbox. And clutches are a wear-and-tear item, so unless you can prove a manufacturing fault, they'll be paid for by the driver.

You find this video helpful, or this one. And read the handbook! :p
 

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All good comments above. AFAIK we have not had any forum member report clutch pack failure on here so far. The box seems to take care of itself pretty much but as noted by others, taking some time to understand how it behaves will help you to develop some sympatico. Just try to notice what happens with the box and relate that to the driving conditions and you will soon start to anticipate it. Biggest learning curve for me was slow parking and low speed manouevering - it takes a delicate right foot and don't try to rush it.
 

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Biggest learning curve for me was slow parking and low speed manoeuvring - it takes a delicate right foot and don't try to rush it.
I must admit, it is this that causes me some reservations.

Recently I had reason to have to park for a few days in a very awkward little yard off a narrow back alley, penned-in on four sides by high concrete walls. Despite reversing camera and parking sensors it was still a nerve-wracking six, seven, eight shuffles to get in or out (fortunately not in the dark). I thought at the time how happy I was to be driving a manual with a 'proper' pull-up handbrake! My previous car was a slushbox automatic with a manual handbrake that would have made it a little more difficult but not massively so; I'm not sure how I'd have coped with a DCT and a electronic handbrake.
 

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I must admit, it is this that causes me some reservations.

Recently I had reason to have to park for a few days in a very awkward little yard off a narrow back alley, penned-in on four sides by high concrete walls. Despite reversing camera and parking sensors it was still a nerve-wracking six, seven, eight shuffles to get in or out (fortunately not in the dark). I thought at the time how happy I was to be driving a manual with a 'proper' pull-up handbrake! My previous car was a slushbox automatic with a manual handbrake that would have made it a little more difficult but not massively so; I'm not sure how I'd have coped with a DCT and a electronic handbrake.
Mine does not have the EPB but it does have HSA which will hold the brakes for a few seconds until the car starts to move if you are on a slope. It is definitely a skill to be learned and a very gentle right foot is needed. If the ground is level then mine will creep if you just release the brake and wait a little but the slighest of slopes will stop it. Sometimes I use a light and brief dab on the accelerator to start it moving. Steeper slopes are more problematic but practice helps.
 

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Mine does not have the EPB but it does have HSA which will hold the brakes for a few seconds until the car starts to move if you are on a slope. It is definitely a skill to be learned and a very gentle right foot is needed. If the ground is level then mine will creep if you just release the brake and wait a little but the slighest of slopes will stop it. Sometimes I use a light and brief dab on the accelerator to start it moving. Steeper slopes are more problematic but practice helps.
Starting to sound like more trouble than its worth, just to have those racing changes.. ;)
 

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Starting to sound like more trouble than its worth, just to have those racing changes.. ;)
Not the point of DCT at all and I find mine, while quicker than a manual it is nothing like a Ferrari flappy paddle - there are pauses to allow engine rpm matching which race cars and supercars do not bother about. The reason that DCTs are becoming ubiquitous are:

1) They are lighter and more energy efficient than slush boxes

2) They allow more ratios thus keeping the engine nearer to its optimum rpm.

I would get really hacked off with a 7 speed manual!
 
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