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Discussion Starter #1
I cant seem to find an answer to this via google, but when did the sportage start using turbos in the petrol cars ? After having a bad experience with an E60 BMW 520D blowing the turbo and having a runaway engine destroy the car (pretty much) i dont want another turbo. So i am looking at petrol with natural aspiration ,the Sportage i have my eye on is a 2014 133BHP 1.6 petrol. Any help would be great. Thank you.
 

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I'm pretty sure all the petrol engined third generation Sportages were naturally aspirated in the UK. There's a mix of naturally aspirated and turbo-charged petrol engines in the fourth (current) generations Sportages. Looking at those listed on Autotrader the 1.6 naturally aspirated models will show as 133bhp, the 1.6 turbos will be listed as 174bhp. Former are called GDi, the latter T-GDi. There's not many about, but the third generation also has 2.0 naturally aspirated petrol at 160bhp, which will feel a bit less strained.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm pretty sure all the petrol engined third generation Sportages were naturally aspirated in the UK. There's a mix of naturally aspirated and turbo-charged petrol engines in the fourth (current) generations Sportages. Looking at those listed on Autotrader the 1.6 naturally aspirated models will show as 133bhp, the 1.6 turbos will be listed as 174bhp. Former are called GDi, the latter T-GDi. There's not many about, but the third generation also has 2.0 naturally aspirated petrol at 160bhp, which will feel a bit less strained.
Thank you for the quick reply. Nice! im a happy guy with that info. the days of speed and 0-60 are long gone for me lol. i just need reliability and comfort.
 

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You won't get a "runaway" with a Turbo failure with a petrol engine. It's still not good if one fails, but you can also hear them long before they fail on a petrol compared to a Diesel, but not a common occurrence nowadays, was very common in the 80's/90's on some engines more than others.
 

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Agree with Joey. The runaway is usually caused by turbo bearing failure which allows engine oil under pressure (turbo bearings have a good oil supply for cooling) into the inlet so it runs on that and does not need diesel fuel.
 

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You won't get a "runaway" with a Turbo failure with a petrol engine. It's still not good if one fails, but you can also hear them long before they fail on a petrol compared to a Diesel, but not a common occurrence nowadays, was very common in the 80's/90's on some engines more than others.
All i know is i got a bill to make my eyes water and the car was never the same. Oh and this was on a car that had done just under 70k.
 

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Could have been a manufacturing fault, but many (not saying yours) fail due to low oil levels, not changing the oil regularly, wrong grade of oil, overheating on the engine generally, low coolant if a water cooled Turbo like mine, air locks in the coolant, which can be introduced when draining to re fill with anti freeze, more commonly from not letting the engine idle for a time after you pull up, especially if the engine has been working hard, it was common practice to fit "Turbo Timers" some time ago which was a device that allowed you to lock the car but the engine continued to run for a while after, more modern stuff have electric oil or water pumps that run after the engine is stopped, so that the Turbo can cooled or lubricated and cooled, hence less failures on more modern Turbo engines. It's amazing how many with Turbos either thrash them or tow heavy loads and turn the engine off straight away, a Turbo without one of the protection methods above will not survive that for long. Some cars benefit from an oil cooler or bigger oil cooler, even if the engine shows it is running at a normal temp the oil can be extremely hot as it touches parts the coolant doesn't, hot oil is thin and again not good for a Turbo not surprising when you consider a typical Turbo Charger runs at about 150,000 revolutions per minute.
 
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