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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks Im new to this forum. I've been using a vacuum pump for changing oil on cars for the last 3 years, I find that more oil can be removed this way.
Is there anything in the Kia Ceed 1.4 crank case that can be damaged by pushing an aprox. 6mm O.D. plastic tube down the dipstick tube?
When the plastic tube is pushed to the bottom, only 2 liter of used oil is extracted.
However if the tube is manipulated and stabbed a bit so that it bends off to the car's LH side, then about 3.4 liter can be extracted.
I have not had to stab and manipulate the 6mm tube so much to get it the last few cm down on other cars.
 

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Hi folks Im new to this forum. I've been using a vacuum pump for changing oil on cars for the last 3 years, I find that more oil can be removed this way.
I am a little unsure how one would be able to get more oil out through the dipstick hole than by draining from the sump plug ??? As long as the car/sump is at the correct angle for draining,then removing the sump plug is going to allow as complete a draining as is possible.
 

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I am a little unsure how one would be able to get more oil out through the dipstick hole than by draining from the sump plug
In truth, the difference between the vacuum extraction method and the traditional sump drain method is minimal. If we say that a sump drain removes 96-98% of the oil, a decent suction device will probably remove 93-96%…..ish in both cases.

Now that flushing oil has gone out of fashion and modern, fully-synthetic lubricants are used commonly, it really doesn’t matter if 100% of the used engine oil is evacuated. Were it a risky endeavour, manufacturers would have stricter servicing regimes and the likes of KIA and those others providing long-term warranties would probably re-think and shorten their engine warranty to the industry norm.

However, the manufacturers base their warranty provision on the tried and tested advice from engineers, chemists and their own bean counters. In the case of Hyundai/KIA, we should be grateful that they have sufficient confidence in their products to continue the provision of one of the very best warranty deals in the business.
 

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I agree - but the OP stated that he could get more oil out by using a vacuum pump and tube,which is what I disagree with,as long as the car is level or tilted at the best angle for max drain then it is likely that one will get more oil out with the drain method.There are pros and cons of both methods - and that will vary from car to car and the age of the owner.
At my age now - it is a bit of a comedy show watching me trying to get up off the ground these days,but I personally prefer the drain method :)
 

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45 years since I did any car servicing. Don't think would ever use a pump. The only advantages are that it is easier and cleaner on the operator. But it doesn't often get all of the oil out.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
To be able to say that more oil is removed by the vacuum pump then the same vehicle needs to be drained by both methods and the resuts compared. This may not be true for all vehicles. To compare , the oil level also needs to be the same before starting the draining process. On the few vehicles that I have drained by both Vacuum pump and removing the drain plug I have seen slightly more removed by the vacuum method. This is probably because the drain plugs are not downward facing at the lowest point where they would be closer to contact with the road, they have been sideways facing or perhaps, tilted slightly downwards from sideways . In such a case just parking the vehicle with a front wheel on a wooden block under the "up hill" side will assist getting more oil out via the drain plug.
If one knows which end or side of the vehcle to lift so that more oil runs out then that's just fine otherwise it's best just to leave it level I guess. In the case of the Kia Ceed 1.4 it is a bit difficult to get the suction tube all the way to the side of the oil pan at the lowest point so without a flexible enough tube it's not possible to get more than 2.0 liter out. On the cars that I've drained via the drain plug, I have never seen any metal or solid debris in the oil.
 

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On the cars that I've drained via the drain plug, I have never seen any metal or solid debris in the oil.
There isn’t nearly as much in the way of swarf or other very small metallic debris to be found in modern engines thanks to the computer-aided technology used in engine manufacture nowadays. That is reflected in the fact that the first oil change on some cars may not be performed until c 20,000 miles, or 12 months. Some luddites still cannot get their heads round that, usually pontificating such adages and wisdom as, ‘Just to be on the safe side!’ or ‘Better safe than sorry', ‘All my cars have always had an oil change every year since 1955!’, many actually paying dealers for additional oil changes because a gallon or so of oil is cheap……er, not from a dealer, it isn’t!

In the case of KIA, those models deemed capable of running 20,000 miles or 2 years without an oil change are still covered by the 7-year warranty so if disaster were to strike, KIA would have to foot the bill for engine repair or replacement providing the vehicle remains warranty-intact.

In my youth, the first oil change on some cars was required after 500 miles and servicing was every 3,000 miles on some, 5,000 on others. When the first longer service interval models hit the showrooms, the nay-sayers and doom-mongers in the trade predicted lots of engine seizures or exploding engines with floods of oil on the roads!

Needless to say, it didn’t happen and then we had semi-synthetic followed by fully-synthetic oils which promised (according to one American motor trade spokesman) that oil changes would be a thing of the past, so good was the lubrication in any climatic conditions. Only the occasional top-up would be all that would be required during the life of the car!

The oil company shareholders were more than a little miffed at that statement from a car sales executive and the claim was very quickly dropped from the advertising.:unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is easier to sell a new car that requires service every 20,000 miles than it is to sell one that requires service every 10k. However for those of us who buy older used cars with 100,000+ km on the clock its more of a risk buying a vehicle that's had only 3 oil changes ever. In the small text of the service schedual it usually says oil change interval for ex. 30,000km or 12 months and that the change interval should be halved if any one of the following conditions have existed: towing, extreme cold, extreme heat, short trips, inner city driving, use of oil that does not meet the long life spec. and so on. Its probably better to use cheap oil for halv the interval than to use expensive oil for twice as long, as long as it is correct viscosity and API or ACEA grade.
for those who are concerned about using more motor oil and the environment: If your car lasts a few years longer because of more frequent oil changes then it wont need to be scrapped and replaced with another vehicle that requires a lot of oil to fabricate.
 

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"Its probably better to use cheap oil for half the interval than to use expensive oil for twice as long, as long as it is correct viscosity and API or ACEA grade." I wouldn't go with that theory.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
by cheap oil I mean quality oil that meets the required specification purchased at a low price, not oil of substandard quality which can also be purchased at high prices. For example I buy and hoard mobil 1 from a supermarket type store when they sell it at half their usuall low price once or twice a year. For me that's cheap oil.
 
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