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Titanium Silver Kia Picanto GT-Line S 1.0 TGDI
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Everybody,
Just joined today.

I have recently purchased a Titanium Silver 2019 Kia Picanto Gt-Line S 1.0 TGDI.
The car only has 5100 miles on it, Really enjoy driving it & am spoilt with all the equipment you get on the GT-Line S. I recently fitted a Bluespark tuning box, I have tried the settings from C to E, Setting E was mental, the car pulls like train, I decided to go for setting D, car runs great on shell v power & has really woken the car up, getting around 55 mpg driving steady. Also I had to change my mpg computer to UK MPG, was set to US MPG.

My question to you all: Being a turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine I have concerns with future carbon build up on the inlet valves, intake manifold, throttle body etc so was considering looking into fitting a oil catch can to prevent oil/carbon build up on the inlet valves.
Has anybody with the Kia Picanto 1.0 TGDI fitted a oil catch can?

Thanks all

Bello
 

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Fusion white 2014 Proceed GT Tech
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I wouldn't worry about the catch cans to be honest; your tuning box will detonate the engine long before you get any carbon build-up... ;)

Oh, and welcome to the forum! Hopefully someone will Picanto experience will be along to advise you soon.
 

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Titanium Silver Kia Picanto GT-Line S 1.0 TGDI
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Discussion Starter #3
I wouldn't worry about the catch cans to be honest; your tuning box will detonate the engine long before you get any carbon build-up... ;)

Oh, and welcome to the forum! Hopefully someone will Picanto experience will be along to advise you soon.
Thank you for your reply, interesting comment, take it your not a fan of the Bluespark Tuning box?
 

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Fusion white 2014 Proceed GT Tech
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Ha! No, I have no problem with BlueChip. But experiences seem to vary widely with all tuning boxes; some people have no problems, some people do. Are you planning to have your Picanto serviced by the main dealer or have you decided to do it yourself? Something to ponder is are tuning boxes genuinely untraceable when removed at service time? Or worse, in the event of a major failure...

But hey, I don't want to out a downer on things! My post was just a bit of the craic. It's your car and your money and you should enjoy them both as you want to. The GT Line S is a cracking little car by all accounts.
 

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Titanium Silver Kia Picanto GT-Line S 1.0 TGDI
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Discussion Starter #5
gdh300 I am not offended, were thick skinned here in North Yorkshire! The Bluespark tuning box seems to be well set up, Ed at Bluespark is a very switched on guy, I did my research before purchasing the module.
As for servicing thats not really a problem to me. I am a fully qualified automotive technician who has worked for BMW, Toyota, Volvo, Honda & Mini. The box can be removed in 10 minutes. As for your question can it be traced, the answer is no, it is not written into the erprom on the ecu. The box takes it values from the Map & Boost pressure sensor which are altered to send a different voltage to the ecu.
Yeah the car is great, seems to built well, hopefully look forward to lots of trouble free miles in it.
 

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My question to you all: Being a turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine I have concerns with future carbon build up on the inlet valves, intake manifold, throttle body etc so was considering looking into fitting a oil catch can to prevent oil/carbon build up on the inlet valves.
Has anybody with the Kia Picanto 1.0 TGDI fitted a oil catch can?

Thanks all

Bello
I share your concern with carbon build up on the inlet valves. Think a catch can is well worth a try and intend to try it on my MY21 model once it has had its first 3000 Km new car inspection. Think hose set up is a bit different on the newer model, but I see there is a hose entering just before throttle body that is fed by a solenoid valve. I will investigate further, but really interested to hear how you go with fitting a can and the amount it collects.
Also keen on a Bluespark unit, but the connectors have been changes on the latest model. I have sent some pictures to Ed to investigate .
 

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If you modified the emission system by routing vapours into a catch tank instead of back into the engine you would be breaking the law and would make your car illegal to use on the road. Cars are approved for use in the condition presented by the manufacturer, any changes would affect your insurance and would (should) in the case of your suggested mod lead to an MOT failure, it would also invalidate your warranty.

Do you really want to increase pollution in the atmosphere when manufacturers and many governments have been trying to lower them for years. The last car I owned that had a simple set up that vented to atmosphere was back in the 70's, after that they vented into the airfilter until better ways were developed.

Don't do it, think about the pollution we would create if we all took such a selfish choice.
 

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Don't do it, think about the pollution we would create if we all took such a selfish choice.
That is not how a modern catch can works. It simply fits between vent hose and intake, ( has inlet and outlet hose) so there is no change to venting circuit. It simply knocks out some of the oil vapor as condensed liquid and this remains in the can.
All vapour returns to engine for re-burning as before, so nothing illegal.
 

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Picanto 1.0T GDi GT-Line
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To be fair the old Chrysler (Hillman) Hunters and Avengers in the 60's/70's had a plastic mesh in the PCV pipe from the rocker cover to the inlet manifold that looked like a pan scourer. This had to be removed and washed every 6,000 miles and it was usually gunged. Hardly high tech. Catch cans are just the modern equivalent and as long as fumes are not vented to the atmosphere are legal I understand. I'm unsure how much good they actually do, apart from earning money for the people who sell them, but if Hyundai are content to put an unlimited mileage 5yr warranty on all their (Kia) engines without needing a catch can I'm happy not to worry about not having one. :giggle:
 

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To be fair the old Chrysler (Hillman) Hunters and Avengers in the 60's/70's had a plastic mesh in the PCV pipe from the rocker cover to the inlet manifold that looked like a pan scourer. This had to be removed and washed every 6,000 miles and it was usually gunged. Hardly high tech. Catch cans are just the modern equivalent and as long as fumes are not vented to the atmosphere are legal I understand. I'm unsure how much good they actually do, apart from earning money for the people who sell them, but if Hyundai are content to put an unlimited mileage 5yr warranty on all their (Kia) engines without needing a catch can I'm happy not to worry about not having one. :giggle:
All cars of that period had some mesh in the filler cap and a simple breather in the block, remember how you would see cars with smoke coming from under the engine and not our of the exhaust, that was why.

I for one don't want to see a modern car doing that.
 

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That is not how a modern catch can works. It simply fits between vent hose and intake, ( has inlet and outlet hose) so there is no change to venting circuit. It simply knocks out some of the oil vapor as condensed liquid and this remains in the can.
All vapour returns to engine for re-burning as before, so nothing illegal.
Spot on, a catch can is just another form of preventative maintenance, it is a shame that some people here still have to have an uninformed opinion!
 

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Spot on, a catch can is just another form of preventative maintenance, it is a shame that some people here still have to have an uninformed opinion!
Its also a shame that people appear not to trust the R & D of a major global car manufacturer when the design emission systems that are certified in the countries of sale yst thos people are quite happy to fit aftermarket parts made by blokes in sheds with no certification.

MOT rules must change, at present you get a fail for removing emission kit like DPF's and CAT's, it should be more wide ranging to state any modification will be a fail.

That should also include un-certified re-maps, exhausts etc.

The majority are law abiding, why should the minority be allowed to get away with polluting the planet.
 

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The majority are law abiding, why should the minority be allowed to get away with polluting the planet.
Please do some proper research before posting such comments about "law abiding" and polluting the planet.
A catch can does nor circumvent any emissions. In fact capturing oil vapour by condensing them, actually reduced the need for engine to burn them. That's actually a good thing!

Manufactures typically do not fit them, as they are an extra maintenance item, requiring more frequent emptying than standard service intervals, plus as water vapour also condenses in them, they can freeze contents in cold climates. A technically competent enthusiast, that looks after vehicle, can cope with this requirement.

BTW - I have spent 30 years working in air pollution control industrty.
 

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MOT rules must change, at present you get a fail for removing emission kit like DPF's and CAT's, it should be more wide ranging to state any modification will be a fail.
It is a shame that a modification cant be considered an improvement over an initial design in your opinion. Lucky for us convicts, things seem a bit more progressive with our rules!
 

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It is a shame that a modification cant be considered an improvement over an initial design in your opinion. Lucky for us convicts, things seem a bit more progressive with our rules!
They will have to change, we only have one planet.

My 2 x great grandmother arrived in Sydney in 1852 on the Talevera. Obviously saw the light and came back in 1868.
 

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They will have to change, we only have one planet.
My 2 x great grandmother arrived in Sydney in 1852 on the Talevera. Obviously saw the light and came back in 1868.
When are you getting an EV then and leaving this forum if you are so worried? Pretty sure you have banged on about this before in another thread. I know I am doing my bit by driving a car that gets 4.8L/100 (with turbo trickery box fitted) and which is why us actual Picanto owners like to talk about ideas for our cars.

It was probably for the best they returned to the beloved homeland from that dreaded colony!
 

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Picanto 1.0T GDi GT-Line
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The point of a catch can is to trap any oil/water/fuel before it is drawn into the inlet manifold. The theory is that otherwise this mixture gets burnt onto the exhaust valves causing carbon build up and hence inefficient gas flow. As I say there are many vehicles running happily out there with many hundreds of thousands of miles on them (taxi's for instance) all over the world that do not have nor need a catch can. They are probably of use in very highly tuned engines but for the vast majority they are just a fashion accessory I suspect.
 
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