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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Through my employer and using salary sacrifice, I am able to lease either a PHEV or Electric car, without the usual constraints that leasing a vehicle comes with, i.e being tired into a long contract. With this, I can return the vehicle if I am ever made redundant or resign.

Currently, I drive a 10-year-old diesel estate, and up to early 2020 was covering some 20k miles per year, averaging 50mpg. Due to covid and a change in circumstance, I have only covered 8k miles @ 48mpg (more town driving) in 2020, and so far 5.2k miles @43.6mpg (mostly town driving and a sticking inlet valve). The car is relatively high mileage and is starting to cost more in maintenance to keep on the road, shock absorbers, anti-roll bar links, bushes, and an upcoming cambelt and water pump service, plus I expect my mileage to increase in the coming years to circa 12.5k miles.

Because of this, and upcoming introductions of ULEZ zones meaning I can't have my current car at my own flat despite having parking, I looked at the Niro PHEV. I managed to test an Xceed over a 31-mile route, covering both city and dual carriageway, starting with a battery level of 30% and averaged 70 mpg over the test route and really enjoyed the relaxing nature of the car.

Most of my current driving could be completed using the PHEV range with a full battery, which I can charge at a local Charge Place Scotland charger in the evenings, but I will potentially be making longer trips (~500 miles) once a month, what mpg/running costs could be expected over this kind of distance?

The E-Niro also throws a spanner in the works, as I would be comfortable with its quoted range (less so the winter range), and the reduced BIK rate compared to the PHEV makes it an attractive option. The main downside however is the lack of charging capability at home.

Has anyone else had a similar choice to make?
 

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Hi & Welcome.
I have edited your title to see if we can get some EV input.

If longer trips are going to be a regular feature & you have time constraints on these. Then a PHEV could be the better option. As you will have to factor in charging stops on a EV.
You maybe able to charge at each end. But winter does cause range to reduce on a EV, so if you have a 250 mile trip each way. Odds on you will need to top up, just to build in a safety margin. Now that may not be too bigger problem if you are stopping for something to eat as 20 to 80% on 150kW charger should be in the region of 30 mins. Subject to chargers being free.
Will you have a facility to charge at home? As PHEV can cost more to charge (unless they are free) than they would in petrol, due to the 3.6kW charging speed no matter what speed the charger will run at.
So in reality you need to charge a PHEV at home. Which would also be best with a EV, or you are going to end up increasing your travel time to keep topping battery up on your long run.

We used to have a salary sacrifice option, but as many people found when they left. They had to return the car, no option to keep it.

I know Charge Place Scotland used to be free, but is it still? As they have migrated the network and their site mentions sending out invoices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome and reply!

The main issue I have with both PHEV and EV is the lack of a home charger, and not being able to install one where I live in. There are a few Charge Place Scotland points nearby, most of which are 22kw @19p kwh, and a few 7kw chargers also at 19p kwh. The free and fast chargers are less common and a reasonable distance from where I live. Also, my main destination on the longer trips has a lack of charging points as it is relatively rural, so during my time there, I would have to make a point of heading to the nearest towns with a charger if I didn't have much range left in an EV, or use an overnight 3-pin plug to charge the PHEV. Alternatively, I could find accommodation that offers access to charge. I just wish PHEV's would charge quicker!

For salary sacrifice, we can give the car back penalty-free, but could also be offered the chance to buy the car from the lease company.
 

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Even using the fastest charger on a PHEV is going to be at least 3 hours. Even using a 3pin plug is only 4 hours. (20 to 80%)


Never mind many EV owners get very upset when they see a PHEV charging as they know that charger is out of action for a long time, or the owner is only getting a couple of miles extra range at best.

Some PHEV's do. But you then find that they have a habit of catching fire.. As they overheat. Ford, BMW Mini being 2 that had major recall issues last year on this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's a strange predicament, PHEV's could be an ideal compromise to reduce costs and local emissions in town, but offer slow charging which EV owners get annoyed with if using the public chargers.

If you have a charger at home it seems to make the idea of a PHEV redundant, as it would make owning a full EV much easier, but then there are still some gaps in places to charge or issues with chargers not working etc.

Occasionally I think just keeping the old diesel, without considering the 'green' credentials of going electric, is sometimes the best option if it wasn't for the ULEZ 馃ぃ
 

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Owned an Xceed under SS scheme. Car is great so far. No home changer but able to charge freely in London daily to cover my commute. No issues at all for longer journeys as I can make use of the ICE. Difficult to get accurate consumption figures especially if using EV on most days. . Looking to install a home charger when I finally move outside London. Have you looked at the EV6?
 

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Can I ask how that works out under salary sacrifice? What sort of savings or payments per month?
 

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Owned an Xceed under SS scheme. Car is great so far. No home changer but able to charge freely in London daily to cover my commute. No issues at all for longer journeys as I can make use of the ICE. Difficult to get accurate consumption figures especially if using EV on most days. . Looking to install a home charger when I finally move outside London. Have you looked at the EV6?
Your consumption includes the EV side.
So how many miles have you done & what is the average MPG over that period.
 

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So the PHEV has a WLTP of 201.8 MPG.

Which clearly you would never get on ICE only. It is the inclusion of EV that boosts the MPG

That is how HEV's & PHEV's are sold.

It's not a case of ICE only. It is what your average MPG is using both ICE & EV.

My HEV has a average MPG of 54 over 5K miles.
 

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The long term consumption since I got it (2 years, but only about 13k km due to Covid) on my Niro PHEV is 3.6 l/100km (78.5mpg). That's using more or less 100% EV pottering around shopping etc. during the week, and a mix of ICE and EV at weekends of 50-100km drives through quite hilly country roads and about one long motorway+mixed roads trip per month. On long journeys with motorway for the most part and country road driving at each end, I get around 5 l/100km (56.5mpg).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Can I ask how that works out under salary sacrifice? What sort of savings or payments per month?
With salary sacrifice, to start you don't have to make any deposit payment like a normal lease / PCP through a main dealer, the company that runs the scheme deduct a 'gross' value from your monthly salary which is calculated from your estimated mileage (which you can adjust during the agreement) over your selected agreement period (1 - 4 years).

The savings come due to the payments being deducted from your gross salary, meaning that you pay less overall income tax and national insurance on your salary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Owned an Xceed under SS scheme. Car is great so far. No home changer but able to charge freely in London daily to cover my commute. No issues at all for longer journeys as I can make use of the ICE. Difficult to get accurate consumption figures especially if using EV on most days. . Looking to install a home charger when I finally move outside London. Have you looked at the EV6?
The long term consumption since I got it (2 years, but only about 13k km due to Covid) on my Niro PHEV is 3.6 l/100km (78.5mpg). That's using more or less 100% EV pottering around shopping etc. during the week, and a mix of ICE and EV at weekends of 50-100km drives through quite hilly country roads and about one long motorway+mixed roads trip per month. On long journeys with motorway for the most part and country road driving at each end, I get around 5 l/100km (56.5mpg).
Basically the same as how I would be using the car, good to hear that an average of 70mpg+ is achievable and that the motorway consumption is not horrific, contrary to what some people say about PHEV's.
 
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