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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just had the maps updated & now on \type 2 display. Delighted to say that now have the function in Android Auto to have something useful in the other 1/3 of the screen.

Now just need to solve the other UVO issue... 🤦‍♂️ 😂

10690
 

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Did it take them long to do? The dealer has had my car over 7 hours and still not managed to do it. Told the wife some cock and bull about taking too long to downloaded and still had to update an SD Card - there is no SD Card in this version (slot usually usually under the head unit).
 

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Did it take them long to do? The dealer has had my car over 7 hours and still not managed to do it. Told the wife some cock and bull about taking too long to downloaded and still had to update an SD Card - there is no SD Card in this version (slot usually usually under the head unit).
On my last car, a 2017 Sportage, I asked for the map update to be applied while they had the car in for a service. The workshop did the service first and then started the map update just after lunchtime. They rang me at around 4 o'clock and said the update was still running and asked if they could keep the car overnight, I had a courtesy car so that wasn't a problem. The update completed around half past six that evening. So yes it can take a long time.
Conversely the next time I got an update it took 40 minutes.
I don't know how they update your version, but they must have to upload it from something, if not and SD card possibly a USB memory stick.
 

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I've done updates myself in the past, and I know it doesn't take much longer than 20 minutes (maybe a bit longer if you include downloading the files). Regardless, I know for a fact it does not take seven hours, the point I'm making is I'm fed up the the poor service. Lets be honest, there's no reason why UK users shouldn't be able to do this themselves. After all, the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Russia/CIS, Middle East, Brazil and South Korea are able to download the software off the internet and be able to just get on with it. Kia claim the map updates are free, and they must be if they're offered to all these countries, and you're only paying a small charge for labour

The car is less than three weeks old, and the software is over a year out of date. I probably wouldn't have minded so much, but with UVO, it now kindly keeps telling you there is an update available. If the head unit is going to keep prompting you to update it, it's about time UK users were given the option to be able to do it themselves.
 

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I don't understand why some people get so animated over map updates. We have ample road signs in the UK and I have always had a decent road atlas in the back of my car which takes up next to no space at all.

'Here' only update approximately 15% of their mapping each years (I read) and the atlases sold under the AA banner bring out a new one each year - no idea whether it is updated every year though!

Perhaps it's some kind of perverse bragging rights thing that causes those people to believe it essential that they must have the very latest, super-duper, map information and imagery in their infotainment unit?

Almost everyone in the UK has a mobile phone nowadays which accompanies the owner everywhere so, if the latest, most up-to-date directions to anywhere are required, it's very easy to find great information in 'Waze', Apple Maps or Google Maps.

It follows that having the very latest mapping in the integrated nav system isn't really essential at all.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Did it take them long to do? The dealer has had my car over 7 hours and still not managed to do it. Told the wife some cock and bull about taking too long to downloaded and still had to update an SD Card - there is no SD Card in this version (slot usually usually under the head unit).
I think it was about a hour, from checking UVO on car status. But as I had dropped off and gone for a walk which took nearly 3 hours (coffee & breakfast stop included) I can't say for certain.
But dealer did say can take upto 4 hours. But if there is a issue, then it will take as long as it takes. Especially if you get a tech who is a bit computer challenged.

They used a USB stick on mine, but again how the desk person says something may indicate that they are used to SD card updates. Which to be fair is how Kia's are usually updated. Only the newer 10.25 head units do not have the SD card.

Self updating will come, it's just a matter of when. Could be there is something in the franchise contracts that do not allow it at the moment.
Who knows. Given we do not work for Kia it's all a guess.
 

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For the 10.25" display using a USB stick the update takes around 35 mins for the "quick" update, where the head unit is unusable in the meantime, or about an hour if you use the "general" update method where it remains usable, and everything is done in the background until it needs to reboot.

If it takes any longer than that, then my money is on the dealer including the time it takes to download everything from scratch for each update over a slow-as-hell internet connection. In reality, they only need to do this once for every update and keep a stock of USB sticks and SD cards on hand, but it appears from what I've read on other forums that some of them don't realise this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I guess they are not geared up in the way many of us are that are used to dealing with computers.

All they need to to download all the various updates onto a computer. Then choose which one they want for each car and load it on to either a USD or SD card.
Time actually take to do that is not worth counting as office staff could handle that and just give card to tech. It is then just the time that the car takes to update. But as we know things can & do go wrong with updates. Especially if car powers down mid update.
 

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If you've ever read any of the sets of instruction floating around for some of the software versions available on the internet, they lay out in excruciating detail what a dealer should do in terms of creating sets of USB sticks and SD cards for all the various Gen's. There's absolutely zero need to recreate the software update media from a PC for every single install, it's a one off job for someone, once every 6 months or whatever when the new updates are released, put all the media somewhere safe and get out the one required when needed. The only other thing for the older head units is to update the owner's map SD card from the stored maps on the PC.

This is going to be a big issue going forward, not only for Kia but all manufacturers. When owners are more au fait with the technology than the dealers are it's just going to become embarrassing.
 

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Why did KIA switch to dealer updates only? On one of my earlier sportages I could download updates from the Kia website onto a flash drive then just plkug it in to the car. Job done in about 20 minutes and free. Last time I checked in Europe you could still do this, it's only the UK where we have to pay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Why did KIA switch to dealer updates only? On one of my earlier sportages I could download updates from the Kia website onto a flash drive then just plkug it in to the car. Job done in about 20 minutes and free. Last time I checked in Europe you could still do this, it's only the UK where we have to pay.
Europe is the same as the UK and has been since Kia Update site was launched a couple of years ago.

 

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Hi, I'm brand new to all this and am quite amazed.

I've just bought a 2020 Soul EV and started to check how to update maps and software. Now if I lived in the States, Canada or New Zealand, I could do this all myself via the website and a usb stick, but not for some unfathomable reason in Europe and the UK, I have to go to a dealer and fork out some cash for someone to do a job a 7 year old could do whilst playing Minecraft.

I'd just mention that for the last 5 years I have been happily updating my Renault software and mapping data. When I decided to move to a modern ev I didn't think would be taking a step back.

Yes, I know that Google maps will always be more up-to-date than an onboard nav system, but really that's not the point. Ah well, c'est la vie.
 

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This is going to be a big issue going forward, not only for Kia but all manufacturers. When owners are more au fait with the technology than the dealers are it's just going to become embarrassing.
I couldn't agree more.

The thing is, with the advent of mobile phones, tablets, laptops, etc, most people are familiar with how to perform an update. The fact that the head unit is nothing more than a simplified tablet inside a car doesn't detract from the fact the update process is exactly the same. Present update package at device, device reads package, recognises it as an update package, installs package. Job done.

Anyone who was an earlier adopter of broadband will remember how once upon a time someone had to come to your house and set up the router for you. Nowadays, you sign up to broadband, the router is shipped to you and you follow a few basic instructions, connect some cables and you're on the internet. In reality there's a few bits and bobs going on within the technology, but the point is, it's been simplified so much that someone with absolutely no knowledge or experience of computer networking can set the device up.

Anyone claiming there is a considerable risk of destroying the car head unit is either inexperienced or has suffered some incredibly unlucky outcome. It's fair to say that not everyone will be comfortable updating the head unit and for those people a trip to the dealership and small charge is fine. However, those of us who are confident, and maybe experienced or even employed in technology industries who probably have more experience than the person you've tasked the job to, should be allowed to get on with it.

Ultimately, there is no argument against it, Kia has already given a significant number of countries' owners the ability to update their own head units, so there is no reason why the same offering is not available to the UK.
 

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I don't understand why some people get so animated over map updates. We have ample road signs in the UK and I have always had a decent road atlas in the back of my car which takes up next to no space at all.

You miss the point, it's not about the map update, or the contents of the map (although if you have some new roads near you, or maybe you live on a new estate it might be), more importantly it's about the firmware update, in other words the bug fixes that have been implemented, or the new features added etc. What is worse is that when using the device (that I might add you've paid for), it keeps telling you there is a new update available, then you might think it prudent to update it. Equally if you've just bought a new vehicle, you would expect the software on it to have the latest version. You wouldn't be happy if you bought a phone or laptop, then got home and discovered the software on the device was last year's version and there was no way to update it other than to contact the manufacturer.

Regardless, as vehicles become more and more connected, in other words connected to the internet, which UVO is, then there is greater exposure to security flaws and being hacked. The more complex and feature rich the experience, the greater the chance of security flaws being found. The way you mitigate these risks is to continually update with patches (or bug fixes) as and when those security flaws are found and fixed. As it is with your mobile phone or PC, patching your car should become normal. Ideally, the car should perform over the air updates to take away some of the pain from the end user.

While the current offering of UVO is basic, and the internet exposed features are basic, it's only a short while before your mobile phone becomes the key to your vehicle (I think this may already be an offering in some regions). Currently UVO can allow you to lock the vehicle, there is an "unlock" function, but it seems to be currently disabled, it should be fairly obvious what the security implications are if bugs were exposed by criminals.
 

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You miss the point, it's not about the map update, or the contents of the map (although if you have some new roads near you, or maybe you live on a new estate it might be), more importantly it's about the firmware update, in other words the bug fixes that have been implemented, or the new features added etc. What is worse is that when using the device (that I might add you've paid for), it keeps telling you there is a new update available, then you might think it prudent to update it. Equally if you've just bought a new vehicle, you would expect the software on it to have the latest version. You wouldn't be happy if you bought a phone or laptop, then got home and discovered the software on the device was last year's version and there was no way to update it other than to contact the manufacturer.

Regardless, as vehicles become more and more connected, in other words connected to the internet, which UVO is, then there is greater exposure to security flaws and being hacked. The more complex and feature rich the experience, the greater the chance of security flaws being found. The way you mitigate these risks is to continually update with patches (or bug fixes) as and when those security flaws are found and fixed. As it is with your mobile phone or PC, patching your car should become normal. Ideally, the car should perform over the air updates to take away some of the pain from the end user.

While the current offering of UVO is basic, and the internet exposed features are basic, it's only a short while before your mobile phone becomes the key to your vehicle (I think this may already be an offering in some regions). Currently UVO can allow you to lock the vehicle, there is an "unlock" function, but it seems to be currently disabled, it should be fairly obvious what the security implications are if bugs were exposed by criminals.
Precisely. Well said.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Currently UVO can allow you to lock the vehicle, there is an "unlock" function, but it seems to be currently disabled, it should be fairly obvious what the security implications are if bugs were exposed by criminals.
Unlock works.
But remember security starts with your phone. So biometrics or a strong password to get in. Add in the app requires pin or biometrics to work.

End of the day if you are unhappy with the APP you do not have to download & use it. Everything it does can be done in the car.
 

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I couldn't agree more.

The thing is, with the advent of mobile phones, tablets, laptops, etc, most people are familiar with how to perform an update. The fact that the head unit is nothing more than a simplified tablet inside a car doesn't detract from the fact the update process is exactly the same. Present update package at device, device reads package, recognises it as an update package, installs package. Job done.

Anyone who was an earlier adopter of broadband will remember how once upon a time someone had to come to your house and set up the router for you. Nowadays, you sign up to broadband, the router is shipped to you and you follow a few basic instructions, connect some cables and you're on the internet. In reality there's a few bits and bobs going on within the technology, but the point is, it's been simplified so much that someone with absolutely no knowledge or experience of computer networking can set the device up.

Anyone claiming there is a considerable risk of destroying the car head unit is either inexperienced or has suffered some incredibly unlucky outcome. It's fair to say that not everyone will be comfortable updating the head unit and for those people a trip to the dealership and small charge is fine. However, those of us who are confident, and maybe experienced or even employed in technology industries who probably have more experience than the person you've tasked the job to, should be allowed to get on with it.

Ultimately, there is no argument against it, Kia has already given a significant number of countries' owners the ability to update their own head units, so there is no reason why the same offering is not available to the UK.
Why does 'everything' need to be connected? We end up in the situation where one thing breaks and it all breaks. The only reason tech firms want us to be integrated is so that they can sell us more stuff or sell our details to those who want to sell us stuff. Updates being a case in point. I use a 12 year old laptop running Vista. Works perfectly well for 90% of what I need a computer for in my job. (Admittedly I don't use it on the internet).
 
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