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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I moved from a Sportage CRDI All wheel drive to e Niro 2. The Sportage was great but mileage a bit high and was returning at best normal driving 32 mpg. I ordered e Niro did take over 2 months to arrive, is saving me a fortune in fuel, was spending average £120 a month just going to work and back. Luckily for me I can get charged at work but have charger at home too. The only issue I have at present is that the vehicle on full charge should have 280 range, but even after taking back to garage is still stating 265 on full charge. I know it's only 15 miles less but only 3 months old should be 280. Anyone else noticed this ?
 

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2020 e-Niro 4+
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Two things could affect this. The first one being the driving mode, best range is available in Eco mode, the second on whether the air-con is on. Both those added together will reduce your range by more than the 15 miles you are looking for.
My range at 100% is generally just over 300 with the air-con off and in Eco mode, it is also affected by my recent journeys.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do put my foot down in the morning onto a dual carriageway but not over 70, average 60 65 mph, do have heating on cold mornings, but I did read a post stating the car calculates your range from your style of driving. I will see how it's affected if I change my style of driving, thanks
 

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2021 Soul EV FE
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I think you should look at this thread - You are asking a very common question. I'm disappointed that after you had gone to the dealership they didn't leave you with an understandable answer.
The short answer is driving-style, weather and heating. I see that you referred to putting your foot down on the dual-carriageway, so you're on the right track with understanding! :)
Personally, I don't worry too much about the heating or driving style as the difference may be significant %, but it's whatever percentage of £10-20 for a "full tank" rather than that percentage of £80.
I tend to use a lot of regen as I like having so much control on the accelerator and minimising the brake. ICE makes heat in the engine and you slow down wasting all of that kinetic energy into heating up disks. Our Kias do a great job of recovering that energy via regeneration.

Please go and read that thread about estimated range :cool:
 

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2020 Kia E-Niro 4
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Mine was showing over 300 last summer, more recently 260-270, it depends on the weather(and driving style) high speed motorway work will deplete the range, but steady 50-60 work will see an improvement in your figures. It all depends on what sort of journeys you are doing. If I recall, turning on the Air Con made the GOM drop about 10 miles or so back last year. Same with the heater, I don't think your model has a heat pump, so will use power for the heating element. My model 4 also uses the heating element at the start to get the car warm so battery drain is a higher proportion if you do a lot of short cold journeys. On longer trips it's a much smaller percentage of overall battery useage. You can see the figures in the ECO menu on the head unit.
 

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Hi & Welcome.

They do not call it a Guess O Meter for nothing.
Plenty of people have seen it drop from 20 to 10 & then zero in far less miles.

Like @RobinB said it's a real shame that dealer did not say this is normal and fully explain how the EV works. Which means one of 2 things. Either they were fobbing you off with a battery reset? Or they simply do not know themselves.

Thankfully we have some very knowledgeable EV owners here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi & Welcome.

They do not call it a Guess O Meter for nothing.
Plenty of people have seen it drop from 20 to 10 & then zero in far less miles.

Like @RobinB said it's a real shame that dealer did not say this is normal and fully explain how the EV works. Which means one of 2 things. Either they were fobbing you off with a battery reset? Or they simply do not know themselves.

Thankfully we have some very knowledgeable EV owners here.
I am a new EV owner and all this information is very helpful thankyou
 

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I'm surprised at how often this comes up to be honest. Really what's shown on the GOM is no different at all to the range shown on the displays of any other ICE or Hybrid car made in recent years. It also varies wildly depending on the time of year, driving style, type of journey, and the mpg figures shown on the same displays never match the manufacturer's claimed figures either. I don't think anyone would expect to see exactly the same figure displayed there every time you filled up with petrol or diesel, so why expect it with an EV?
 

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While you are correct on the GOM = Range in a ICE

In a EV there are many factors that affect the GOM reading compared to a ICE car. Such as running heater has no effect on a ICE, but has a big effect on a EV.

In many EV's GOM is the only way to tell how much range you have left, and is also not linier in many of them. So will drop really fast at the lower end. Very much like Kia's range left in a ICE.
If you have % of battery reading. You can not use that to predict range.

@AlunS said I'm surprised at how often this comes up to be honest.
One reason I think dealers need to spend more time with new EV owners explaining the simple things that as ICE driver we understand due to years of use, which do not transfer across to EV's in the same way.
I would add manufacture's in with this, but they do cover a lot in the handbooks. But we all know how often they get read 🤦‍♂️
 

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There is absolutely no need for anyone to read the manual from cover to cover. What there is a need for is anyone with a "problem" to 1) consult their manual, 2) research the forum and then 3) ask an original question which hasn't been done to death for the last 3 years. My first 3 cars cost me less than £100 in total and I reckon I researched them far more than people who are now paying circa £35k for just 1.
 

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2021 Soul EV FE
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I think it is an unfortunate fact that for anyone who buys their first EV "range" is the factor front and centre of any lingering concern.

Even though we thought hard about our choice of car, the WLTP range at 280(ish) is well over the 160 we wanted for a common journey, at night, arriving late and not wanting to stop... but we also knew it would be less in cold. Maybe that was a lot better informed than some, but I still didn't know how much to expect - Some people said 230, some as much as 250, some as little as 200. So right from the get-go I was always interested in what a 100% full range was.
As it happens, not having charging at home I don't often charge to 100%, so I'm more noticing the efficiency of a "drive" being close to or above 4 miles/kWh in the warm and mild time of the year and sometimes dropping to nearer 3 in cold fast drives. So in my head the understanding of what is going on is all in place.... but it doesn't stop me being interested (to this day) in what the GOM says when I fill up. Last night I drove Devon to London, so sometime in the next few days I need to put the car on a public AC charger for many hours. That last 160 miles averaged 3.2 miles/kWh, so a 64kWh battery would hold 205 miles range, on the basis of that one journey average. I expect the GOM will say more after charging because I think it takes far more than the last journey into account. I've never seen it show that little!

When you are actually on a drive it seems to take the current driving/consumption into account and will adjust if you change the conditions, so it seems highly unlikely to predict that you will manage 50 miles (based on the long-term average) when your current consumption would mean the last kWhs left in the battery are only likely to take you 30.

At rest, after a charge, it seems to be some sort of long rolling average that it uses.
I'm not surprised that people ask "how much" does cold weather and driving style affect range and it is difficult to answer - and it is really difficult to give a simple answer because there isn't one.

It's not like ICE cars didn't have variation, dependent on speed, stop-go, sitting in jams, running air-con... but people simply didn't worry about it. Having had our car 10 months I just don't worry about range at all - I don't moderate my speed more than I would in the Focus, because what am I saving? Not a lot! (Each to their own though - do 60 and you'll go further). We left Devon at under 60% so we needed a stop anyway. Stopped at Starbucks. Price for two panninis and two coffees £17.20. Whilst there the car "had a drink" too and in 23 minutes took on 17.47kWh priced at £8.75.
I choose to look at this a refuelling surcharge on a meal & driving break :cool: sat in the warm.
I could have been squelching around on a slimy diesel contaminated forecourt and spent several times the price of my entire eating break (without the food). Of course if you pick up a take-away Costa from a vending machine in the petrol station the Costa becomes the small-change part of the whole :D

As others have said, bit surprised anyone wouldn't have known about weather and driving effects on range, but in fairness to the OP... what do they tell you about the GOM behavour? You might just expect it to read a percentage of the vehicle's range. There are some explanations in the handbook, but I've just had a peek at an e-Niro owner's manual PDF and it manages to loose the basics in a sea of warning soup (as usual)

Font Rectangle Parallel Transparency Document


Why-oh-why don't they start the entire electric section with an explanation that the GOM is an aid. It isn't that EVs are more flawed. We knew that an ICE with 1/4 tank would go less far at 70-80mph than if we were doing 30-50. The GOM provides a range to empty which will fluctuate with seasons and driving style and climate controls.

The huge failure is that garage for not giving a sensible explanation.

I think one thing every garage should do, and should be in a sort of "quick guide to your car" is encourage drivers to select the trip display and specifically put it on the "Drive Info" trip display.
[To be clear, I mean using the driver's LCD, controlled by the RHS steering wheel buttons to get to the "Trip" then "down" through the different trip views to "Drive Info"]
Drivers could then pay attention to that efficiency number of miles-per-kilo-watt-hour. They can see the result for a motorway drive or a around-town drive. They can see the poor number on a freezing morning which gets better once the blower has stopped working so hard to heat the cabin up. It's a question of knowing where to look

Anyone can manage a bit of calculation of efficiency * battery capacity = range, but here it is for a 64kWh battery e-Niro, Soul or Kona:-

miles/kWhrRange
4.8307
4.6294
4.4282
4.2269
4.0256
3.8243
3.6230
3.4218
3.2205
3.0192
[I think that reasonably covers fast+cold through to gentle+warm]
 
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