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MAP sensor will be between the throttle body and the manifold.
 

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If you mean the mass air flow sensor it is just downstream of the air filter
Hi ‘Nikko’.

He may well be talking about the MAF (Mass AIrflow Sensor) but he could be referring to the MAP (Manifold Absolute Pressure) sensor.

As he is looking for guidance, I suspect the OP is not au fait with modern vehicle electro-mechanical gadgetry. Never having lifted the bonnet of a Sportage, I can’t tell him where to look but I’m sure there are correspondents here who will know if the Sportage is equipped with both of these sensors and can pinpoint their locations for him.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am talking about the MAP sensor, I just can't find it for looking, I have done work on cars before just never had to find the map sensor, I want to check to see if the outdated sensor like they have fitted on my Ceed GT
 

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If it helps anyone it is relation to this thread.

 

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am talking about the MAP sensor, I just can't find it for looking, I have done work on cars before just never had to find the map sensor, I want to check to see if the outdated sensor like they have fitted on my Ceed GT
MAPs are typically on petrol engines with throttles. Diesels are unthrottled.
 

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Your car certainly has a throttle - it's the thing which controls how much air gets into the combustion chamber.
the engine in question is a diesel. If it had a throttle to control how much air goes into the combustion chamber then it would not be diesel. Not to be confused with swirl flaps.
 

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Swirl flaps perform an entirely different function - it is you who is confused.

Lots of throttle bodies for diesel engines available to purchase on the interweb

This is a wind up isn't it?
 

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Swirl flaps perform an entirely different function - it is you who is confused.

Lots of throttle bodies for diesel engines available to purchase on the interweb

This is a wind up isn't it?
it is only a wind up if you are doing the winding up.

are you saying that on a diesel engine there is a throttle linked directly to the accelerator pedal to control the amount of air flow and so to control power output? If not, what are you saying?
 

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From memory, or what remains of it!…...the ECU dictates how much fuel the diesel injectors squirt into the combustion chambers. The ECU is advised by sensors what is required and the butterfly valve in the throttle body isn’t opening and closing the airflow to the cylinders so much as signalling to the ECU the position of the valve under the pressure of the driver’s foot. The long word description of the butterfly valve is ‘potentiometer’ and that, allied to the other information from sensors informs the ECU how much diesel the injectors should fire into the combustion chambers…….roughly! :unsure: :)
 

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it is only a wind up if you are doing the winding up.

are you saying that on a diesel engine there is a throttle linked directly to the accelerator pedal to control the amount of air flow and so to control power output? If not, what are you saying?
I am saying that your assertion that diesels do not have a throttle is plain wrong.

To answer your questoin:

Sticking to drive by wire engines (most modern engines are drive by wire), the throttle is moved by an actuator in response to ECU commands which takes account of the accelerator pedal position (and other conditions which might cause the throttle to depart from the accelerator position, such as rev limit, engine overheat, traction control, ESP intervention, limp mode, stall preventer, and with automatics, pending gear shift - there may be others). There is no direct link between the throttle position and the accelerator pedal position but there is an indirect link via the ECU and under ordinary conditions the throttle position follows the accelerator position. The throttle controls the amount of air inducted and thus the amount of power produced.

Now please explain why I can purchase throttle bodies for a wide variety of diesel engines if, as you have claimed, they do not have one?
 

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From memory, or what remains of it!…...the ECU dictates how much fuel the diesel injectors squirt into the combustion chambers. The ECU is advised by sensors what is required and the butterfly valve in the throttle body isn’t opening and closing the airflow to the cylinders so much as signalling to the ECU the position of the valve under the pressure of the driver’s foot. The long word description of the butterfly valve is ‘potentiometer’ and that, allied to the other information from sensors informs the ECU how much diesel the injectors should fire into the combustion chambers…….roughly! :unsure: :)

Er no. The butterfly valve (other forms of throttle are possible) regulates the air flow. The MAP/MAF (not all engines do it the same way) measures the amount of air flowing and the ECU commands the appropriate amount of fuel to give clean combustion.

A potentiometer is an electronic device containing a variable resistance element, it is certainly not a butterfly valve - Google them both. MAF sensors may have a movable baffle which is acted upon by the induction air flow and ithis moves a potentiometer in proportion to the air flow. There alternative arrangements possible and it is more common to measure the cooling effect of the air flow and derive the air flow mass from this, avoiding the need for moving parts.
 

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I am saying that your assertion that diesels do not have a throttle is plain wrong.

To answer your questoin:

Sticking to drive by wire engines (most modern engines are drive by wire), the throttle is moved by an actuator in response to ECU commands which takes account of the accelerator pedal position (and other conditions which might cause the throttle to depart from the accelerator position, such as rev limit, engine overheat, traction control, ESP intervention, limp mode, stall preventer, and with automatics, pending gear shift - there may be others). There is no direct link between the throttle position and the accelerator pedal position but there is an indirect link via the ECU and under ordinary conditions the throttle position follows the accelerator position. The throttle controls the amount of air inducted and thus the amount of power produced.

Now please explain why I can purchase throttle bodies for a wide variety of diesel engines if, as you have claimed, they do not have one?
You are describing the Otto cycle.

An engine running the Diesel cycle is a free breather, ie has no throttle to control the amount of air sucked in. It cannot have one as the throttle would reduce the air temperature on the compression stroke and bugger up fuel ignition.

Having said that, modern diesels may have throttle like devices fitted, ie an air flap to stop air flow to prevent engine run on after switching off or flaps to regulate EGR. But these do not perform a throttling function as you are describing to regulate the amount of intake air.
 

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Not even an attempt to answer my question, swerving the subject yet again and I seem to find this familiar.

Now I am sure you are on a wind up.

Byeeee
 
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