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2020 Niro "2" HEV
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Everyone
I drove off in my 2020 Niro 2 HEV today, and during the journey found that the Regeneration and Auto Hold was not working. The display on the dash was as expected, but when stopped the "Auto Hold" logo remained white. The fact that regen was also defective was shown by the fact I had to use the brakes more than usual. I did not want to stop, so I moved the gearstick to Sports Mode (which disables regen) and after moving back to ECO regen came back for about a minute or so. I did this a couple more times with the same result. At the end of the journey, I parked up and switched off. On starting the vehicle (about 2 hours later) for the return journey, everything was working correctly! Has anyone else experienced this "phenomenon"?
 

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Is your battery full? If the battery is full then it will not regen and you will get a warning such as - 'conditions not met', or similar.
 

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With auto hold not working, I would pop into dealers. Wonder if it is on a same fuse/relay as regen?

Regen, now it has started getting colder seems to stop a lot sooner than before.
Mine kicks in about 3/4 full when battery is cold, but give it a while to get warm and it's back to only when one mark left.
 

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Niro hybrid 2022
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my Regeneration and Auto Hold ( hev niro 2021 4 ) does not come on when the battery is cold ... as soon as its warmed up its on .. normally after 10 mins driving
 

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Regen will be on, at basic level all the time (when braking). I increase mine to 1 using paddle and that works, even when battery is cold. The only thing that stops it is when system says "Recuperation is no longer available" which puts it back to basic level. But even then it will still top the battery up when braking.
This message is just kicking earlier when it's cold. But will still top battery up further in normal driving.

Auto hold comes on once you pull the switch to activate it when you stop. Goes white when moving & green when brakes are on.
It will not come on without user intervention. Much to many users frustration 🤦‍♂️

Auto Hold & Regeneration are 2 totally separate systems that do 2 totally different jobs.
 

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2020 Niro "2" HEV
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114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you everyone for your input. To avoid any misunderstanding, I am fully aware of how regeneration/recuperation and Auto Hold works. I normally have it set to two arrows, and Auto Hold is always on.
Also, what I failed to mention in my earlier post, is that it seemed like the Daytime Running Lights were not working either (when the regen and auto-hold was not working). This could therefore point to a problem with the handbrake switch or its control circuits. I shall be monitoring the situation, and mentioning it when the vehicle goes on for its second service in January.
 

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In my Soul EV 21, I always set off with a full drive battery in the morning and the Regen works right from the start and I’ve never had any warning that it’s unavailable.
As the journey of 22 miles round trip (school run) is all local driving, I always have Regen set on maximum and it works on that setting every time. I’ve never had anything flag up to say that it’s not doing it’s job.
I would have thought that the Nero and Soul systems are similar if not exactly the same, but of course I could be wrong. 😉
 

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2021 Soul EV FE
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In my Soul EV 21, I always set off with a full drive battery in the morning and the Regen works right from the start and I’ve never had any warning that it’s unavailable.
Like you @KDMB I've got a Soul EV - I have only once fleetingly seen a warning about limited regeneration, but this is my first winter with the car, so there is time yet. I think we will have similar experience to e-Niros, as @iooi pointed out, the original poster has a HEV Niro.
Fundamentally our bigger batteries in BEVs have more advantages than just the range.
I guess that there are many hybrid owners keen enough to be on here who may know this, but I'm sure a lot of prospective purchasers don't...

It goes back to battery basics, and I don't mean EV batteries I mean pretty much any rechargable battery. As the capacity goes up so does the ability to deliver Watts or be recharged. There are more cells to share the current between. I thought I'd quickly look up specifications for some cars, I won't have got exactly the right models, this was from a USA kia.com website, but it shows the "Niro EV" with 64kWh battery capacity capable of delivering 170kW of power. A PHEV with 8.9kWh battery capacity is only capable of delivering 59kW. There are probably all sorts of other factors in there about wiring, but it is clear that the 59kW you can get out of the smaller battery is a lot less than the 170kW from the bigger battery. When it comes to charging you are in the same position, the big battery can spread the current and heat. Accelerating with an HEV can still be adequate with 59kW, its just a bit slower but braking isn't forgiving. If you had two Niros, one EV and one HEV on the road and braking hard from 40mph to 0 in a few seconds it would be the same loss of kinetic energy 'cos they weigh the same and were doing the same speed. One car can use the motor to absorb something like 170kW and pump it back into the battery and the other can only handle 59kW of braking. Of course I don't know if they are designed and rated to be able to do that, but you get the principle. The hybrids are much more limited in how much regen they can harvest when going down a hill or braking. Cold limits the speed of of the chemistry going on inside the battery, so if cold dropped the limits on power in/out by 20% the HEV would only be able to absorb 47kW whilst the BEV would still be able to absorb 136kW. The chances are that most of the time we brake at normal levels we are somewhere in the 0-50kW range, so the HEV drivers sometimes notice that braking is limited. The BEV owners have got so much more capacity to absorb a brief pulse that even shortly after departing at 100% they probably don't get limited.
I'm tempted to try to calculate what 10, 20, 40, 60kW of power is equivalent to in terms of braking mpg/second, but cooking and mindless TV beckons...

BTW This is a reason why people shouldn't worry unduly about using rapid DC chargers as it "might shorten the life of the battery". The act of regen braking is doing exactly what a DC charger does, pumping current back into the battery at close to what it can stand. The danger used to be that the heat contributed to ageing, but we've now got liquid coolants and better thermal management than the early air-cooled EVs.

You can also spot the correlation of BEVs with big batteries being the EVs that take rapid charges of 50kW or way more, whilst the smaller BEVs or hybrids are limited to slower charging. From a slow charge speed you can infer that the car doesn't have nearly as much regen potential. A hybrid might have to warm its brake disks on a steep hill descent whilst a BEV reclaims closer to the energy that it used going up the hill.
 
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