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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Planning our holidays and looking at Dorset, probably based in Swanage. However, looking at charging maps there seems to be few public charging points in Dorset and even fewer on the Purbecks and Swanage.
Anyone live there with a Soul EV (or any electric car)? If so would welcome any advice - or is charging going to be a nightmare? In which case we will probably have to go somewhere else!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Seems to be plenty around on Zap map.

View attachment 16877

Bet there are less petrol stations there 馃ぃ
Yes, plenty around large towns in the east of Dorset but when you get to the Purbeck peninsula - Swanage etc. - it鈥檚 a different story. No fast chargers, best you can get is 7 Kw in council carparks with limited stays. Further West in Dorset chargers are few and far between and slow, where are the 50Kw + chargers? The government are encouraging people to swap to EV鈥檚 but unless the charging network is expanded quickly in country areas I can foresee big problems in the future. It is not just range anxiety it is the simple fact there are not suitable charging points available without travelling long distances. Who wants to do that on holiday?
 

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You have a 200+ range on the Soul. Will you be doing that much local mileage?

22 miles to a Instavolt 120 charger McDonalds, Branksome, 180/182 Alder Rd, Branksome, Poole BH12 4AX
Quite a few 50kW ones in the same area as well.

I get there are not many in the area, but manage any trips in the area should keep you topped up enough not to be a issue.
More EV chargers in Swanage than petrol stations.


It's like our holiday in Norfolk. In the area we were only a couple of miles from coast, there were no chargers. But @ 12 miles from Norwich. It was in easy reach of Gridserve Charging station, that has just opened. So that would have covered most of our weeks mileage. If not other chargers while parked would have topped up. Other option was Great Yarmouth. But less there than the Gridserve station on it's own.

I'm sure you will be fine & have a great time. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We could drive 22 miles to a charge point but that would lose at least 1/2 a day off our holiday for each charge. It is likely we would arrive at Swanage with a low charge remaining so would need a big top up and after driving 200+ miles the last thing I would want is to spend time tracking one down.
In fact what we will do is plot a route to Swanage which has a fast charger as close to Swanage as reasonable and top up there, then keep topping up during our stay at available slow chargers, or run a cable from a 13 Amp socket from the flat we are renting!
The main point I was making is that here we are only 7+ years from when EV鈥檚 will be the only cars sold and there are great swathes of the country very badly served by charge points. I don鈥檛 see any great national drive to increase that number so I wonder what will happen when larger numbers of EV鈥檚 are competing for a few charge points in holiday areas. Massive congestion on changeover days at the few charge points? Basically it needs a government led directive for all local authorities to install universal high speed charge points across the nation - or partner with private companies to achieve the same goal. The chance of that happening in the current financial climate is nil so I really wonder what is going to happen?
 

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It's a bit like the shortage of public parking places in some holiday areas. It's not unknown for some of the locals to rent out their drives as parking places, so maybe they will do the same with their charge points. I haven't looked into it but I believe there's an app for that already.
 

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I get what you are saying & more chargers will come as time goes by. But I bet even by 2030 some area's like this & Norfolk will not have many chargers. As there will not be the demand other than at peak season.

In reality it needs holiday places to install 7kW chargers. That would solve the issue. Rather than lots of fast chargers that will never get used much.
We we stayed they have a external plug to charge cars. But I was talking to them & a 7kW is planned in the next year. As they are seeing more EV owners staying & it is a good selling point (not that they need it most people staying have been coming for years)

It's the reverse for ICE. Less petrol stations. In Norfolk it was 8 miles to the nearest petrol station. So only 4 niles further to a nice place to charge & get coffee etc.

 

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I鈥檓 going to be a bit controversial here and say that I don think that the charging infrastructure is that terrible鈥 Yes, we need lots more and yes it鈥檚 annoying how many can be out of service.
There are some big caveats though.
It is so much easier to travel if your EV has a big battery and hence a greater range. Shorter range EV鈥檚 are really best suited for town/short trip use and the odd longer trip that is very well planned. If you鈥檙e planning on longer trips - get a longer range car if you can afford the extra cost.
The big difference on a longer journey is that to get the best from it, you need to have a charging plan and plan the trip well with an EV. This is new territory for some people. It鈥檚 a different mindset.
Depending on where you go a charge plan can be essential. Some apps and on some cars the built in software can provide really good planning. Some are not so good.
In addition you need to know how to be comfortable in accurately judging your cars actual range during your journey and be relaxed about this.
Your predicted range will not always tell you the full story. A quick check - what miles/kwhr am I actually achieving on this journey? Then multiply that figure by your useable battery capacity to provide a good check and balance on your expected range for your realtime journey, will give you added comfort/insight.
Of course some will just want to charge jump in and go, and I fully understand this ICE derived approach to travel.
EV鈥檚 will probably never have the range that a big tank good economy ICE has so it鈥檚 a case of changing the approach.
EV鈥檚 are not best suited to long distance travel. Most owners will use their EV mostly on shorter trips with the odd longer trip now and then.
If you travel to an area that is very light on rapid chargers, in most cases a rapid will be no more that about 30-40miles from you. So with planning you can use fast or granny charging and rapids as required during your trip.
The other thing to consider is cost.
Rapid chargers are expensive (50p/kw/hr+ is becoming typical), compared to many fast chargers still free (Tesco, Morrisons etc), and home charging from 5p/kw/hr if you鈥檙e lucky enough to have home charging on a night cheap tarif. So you might really want to minimise your rapid use if you can anyway.
Just in the same way as petrol prices vary massively from say Tesco pump and motorway pump prices, when using rapid chargers you can pay well over 10x more than you are used to!
If you鈥檙e travelling for business an EV might not be for you unless you go Tesla. I drove 65k miles over a two and half Year period for business using the Tesla supercharger network and it was generally faultless. Without that infrastructure I would not have been able to complete my works trips without long delays. Is that type of infrastructure the future? Perhaps, but even the supercharger network is not available in certain areas and planning is still needed.
 

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Seems to be plenty around on Zap map.

View attachment 16877

Bet there are less petrol stations there 馃ぃ
Have you set the filter to show just those charging points for which there is publec access?
I checked where I live and there were plenty of points but, set the filter to "Public access" and just one showed up (and that was currently U/S)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I鈥檓 going to be a bit controversial here and say that I don think that the charging infrastructure is that terrible鈥 Yes, we need lots more and yes it鈥檚 annoying how many can be out of service.
There are some big caveats though.
It is so much easier to travel if your EV has a big battery and hence a greater range. Shorter range EV鈥檚 are really best suited for town/short trip use and the odd longer trip that is very well planned. If you鈥檙e planning on longer trips - get a longer range car if you can afford the extra cost.
The big difference on a longer journey is that to get the best from it, you need to have a charging plan and plan the trip well with an EV. This is new territory for some people. It鈥檚 a different mindset.
Depending on where you go a charge plan can be essential. Some apps and on some cars the built in software can provide really good planning. Some are not so good.
In addition you need to know how to be comfortable in accurately judging your cars actual range during your journey and be relaxed about this.
Your predicted range will not always tell you the full story. A quick check - what miles/kwhr am I actually achieving on this journey? Then multiply that figure by your useable battery capacity to provide a good check and balance on your expected range for your realtime journey, will give you added comfort/insight.
Of course some will just want to charge jump in and go, and I fully understand this ICE derived approach to travel.
EV鈥檚 will probably never have the range that a big tank good economy ICE has so it鈥檚 a case of changing the approach.
EV鈥檚 are not best suited to long distance travel. Most owners will use their EV mostly on shorter trips with the odd longer trip now and then.
If you travel to an area that is very light on rapid chargers, in most cases a rapid will be no more that about 30-40miles from you. So with planning you can use fast or granny charging and rapids as required during your trip.
The other thing to consider is cost.
Rapid chargers are expensive (50p/kw/hr+ is becoming typical), compared to many fast chargers still free (Tesco, Morrisons etc), and home charging from 5p/kw/hr if you鈥檙e lucky enough to have home charging on a night cheap tarif. So you might really want to minimise your rapid use if you can anyway.
Just in the same way as petrol prices vary massively from say Tesco pump and motorway pump prices, when using rapid chargers you can pay well over 10x more than you are used to!
If you鈥檙e travelling for business an EV might not be for you unless you go Tesla. I drove 65k miles over a two and half Year period for business using the Tesla supercharger network and it was generally faultless. Without that infrastructure I would not have been able to complete my works trips without long delays. Is that type of infrastructure the future? Perhaps, but even the supercharger network is not available in certain areas and planning is still needed.
You are right in that EV driving calls for a different more involved mindset rather than the 'jump in and drive鈥 we have all got used to with ICE cars. Question is whether drivers are prepared to go back to that level of foresight and planning, some will most won鈥檛 and until range improves and recharging is as widely available as petrol stations (you don鈥檛 have to think about it because a recharge station will be just around the corner) EV take up will be limited and governments forcing the issue will meet resistance as 2030 approaches. Charging needs to be as ubiquitous as filling with petrol/diesel and not require a plethora of Apps or memberships, just turn up, plug in and pay with any credit card - exactly as we do for petrol/diesel. The best way to get more drivers to accept EV鈥檚 is for the government to mandate that commonality of charge networks.
I think, like most people, most of my day to day driving is easily covered by home charging (250 mile range covers most month to month demands). However, for the non business driver the hassle is long holiday journeys and how to reduce the inconvenience of charging times and availability. Holiday destinations with good planning can make sure that they have sufficient charging to meet visitor demand by providing Charging stations BUT as importantly encouraging/forcing holiday accommodation to provide EV charging for their guests. Already we are seeing holiday lets advertising EV charging included and they will become increasingly in demand as EV ownership expands, just like en-suite bathrooms are now standard then so will EV chargers be standard within a few years..... Hopefully!!!
 

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In addition you need to know how to be comfortable in accurately judging your cars actual range during your journey and be relaxed about this.
As new EV owners, this is still something we are adjusting to. It's not so much the credibility of the 'miles to go' figure, more just getting out of the habit of re-fuelling when this figure drops to 100 - 150 miles, as I usually do with the Sorento. This habit is based partly on the fact that the Sorento's most frequent journey is a 90 mile round trip and partly on past experience of non-availability of diesel at the local garage, whether due to them simply running out or something more serious like a strike or panic buying episode. Most recently it was because I found they were having their underground tanks replaced!

Power cuts excepted, charging at home is a much more reliable prospect but it is going to take time for this to translate into being relaxed at running the 'miles to go' down below 50 or so. To date, we've never let it get below 120!
 

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You are right in that EV driving calls for a different more involved mindset rather than the 'jump in and drive鈥 we have all got used to with ICE cars. Question is whether drivers are prepared to go back to that level of foresight and planning, some will most won鈥檛 and until range improves and recharging is as widely available as petrol stations (you don鈥檛 have to think about it because a recharge station will be just around the corner) EV take up will be limited and governments forcing the issue will meet resistance as 2030 approaches. Charging needs to be as ubiquitous as filling with petrol/diesel and not require a plethora of Apps or memberships, just turn up, plug in and pay with any credit card - exactly as we do for petrol/diesel. The best way to get more drivers to accept EV鈥檚 is for the government to mandate that commonality of charge networks.
I think, like most people, most of my day to day driving is easily covered by home charging (250 mile range covers most month to month demands). However, for the non business driver the hassle is long holiday journeys and how to reduce the inconvenience of charging times and availability. Holiday destinations with good planning can make sure that they have sufficient charging to meet visitor demand by providing Charging stations BUT as importantly encouraging/forcing holiday accommodation to provide EV charging for their guests. Already we are seeing holiday lets advertising EV charging included and they will become increasingly in demand as EV ownership expands, just like en-suite bathrooms are now standard then so will EV chargers be standard within a few years..... Hopefully!!!
There are now more than 42,000 charge point connectors across the UK in over 15,500 locations - that's more public places to charge than petrol stations!
!

In 2021 there were 8,378 petrol stations.
.

Yest it takes less time to fill a ICE compared to a EV

On a daily basis, cars in the UK drive an average of 20 miles a day, 142 miles a week, 617 miles a month and 7,400 miles a year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There might be more EV charging points than fuel stations but look where they are? Fine in cities and big conurbations but in rural areas (including West Dorset) public charge points are few and far between. The problem rural areas have is that installing a fast charger needs 3 phase electric supply and that is expensive for small rural Councils and towns. Major EV charge companies are not interested in rural areas because the demand is not 鈥渟ufficient鈥 to justify the investment - a chicken and egg situation!
There needs to be a clear Government policy to foster the expansion of faster charge points in rural areas, but don鈥檛 hold your breath on that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Wrong. PHEV and proper hybrids (not those pointless "mild" hybrids) will continue to be sold until 2035.
Yes you are right but drive is towards EV vehicles. Now whether that is right is debatable; hydrogen fuel cells might be a more elegant solution so instead of having to provide electric chargers all over the country we concentrate the electric supply to generate hydrogen, then distribute that to filing stations where motorists can refuel much as with petrol and diesel. Would also enable trucks to use hydrogen whereas it is highly unlikely trucks can be made electric because of battery demands etc.
However, that would require a massive about face, perhaps we are so far down the electric path it is impossible to make a U turn?
 

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Going to move this thread to General Discussion as its not neccessarily about the Soul EV anymore and others may wish to contribute.

Paul
 
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