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I suggest write to dealer's MD and Kia's UK chief. Start by saying you have a fault which needs fixing, and if no action is taken will then be going to Trading Standards. Then clearly explain the problem. Finish by reiterating your need for a fix under warranty (Inc a courtesy car whilst being done) or you will take it further. As an annex you can summarise the appalling behaviour of dealer's customer facing person.
As a point of interest Trading Std do not deal with the public. You have to go via citizen's advice. Who may forward it to them, but do not expect any action from them. As local councils have cut them down to next to nothing.

As to courtesy car, that is covered under Kia warranty T/C. It is down to dealer.
 

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Do they have petrol driven laptops, to "lose 20 miles worth of fuel"? :)
 

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they get the engine to go into filter cleaning mode via a lap top this involves the engine running for 20/30 mins often at high revs (you wouldnt want to watch it on your car) :eek: the filter has to be at high temperature for the cleaning to be successful.
 

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MY21 Stonic GT-Line S ISG MHEV iMT - sw220211 - map14.47.48.631.401.5
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I thought petrol particulate filters regenerated during in-gear deceleration while the engine runs a lean mixture. Is this a production problem with this model?
 

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It seems that this is a wider issue than the Sportage. Problems with Ford a couple of years ago. Hyundai Tucson owners reporting similar issues. Many folk being told that that they have to do a 'high temp' run to clear it, many more having to go to dealers for the forced regen.
My understanding of GPF function is that petrol engines don't produce as many particulates as diesels and they run at higher temperatures. In decelaration the level of O2 increases which in turn increases the temp. The control systems should also adjust to lean mix, if crud is building up, which again should clear the filter. Thus it shouldn't be happening to any normally used car. Maybe for some extreme cases of nothing but short, stop start joumeys it could get to overfull conditions? I don't know.
One last point, with DPF if you ever get to max level then a forced regen is required. If it is the same with GPF then that might explain why those longer journeys the OP posted did not fix the issue.

I haven't found any info on whether the problems with Ford/Hyundai were ever resolved,
 

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Back in January 2022, i ordered a Tucson ultimate, done my home work, decided this car would best suit my needs. Left a deposit after chatting with sales, at no point is there mention of gpf filters!
I only picked up on the GPF problem from a Hyundai thread on Facebook where a member had vented his spleen over a "petrol particulate filter" or gpf as we know it, blocking with low mileage. Further investigations via the Hyundai uk forums spells out a problem with these filters and as you will read, cars with only 300 miles are showing the gpf regen light. My neighbours Ultimate went in 2 weeks ago for regen at 4k so she had at least a years motoring before it happened. Having gone back to the dealer in Blackpool and talked it over with the service manager in attendance, i was offered, if it did need a forced regen, a free one! The GPF is not a warranty item!!! therefore they have you by the short and curlys but they dont tell you this, last thread i read was that Hyundai are aware of a problem and MAY issue a software update to try and eliminate this problem. Kia and Hyundai are sister companies so i guess what's in the Tucson also powers the Kia. With the evidence stacking up, i have just cancelled the car which was 2 weeks from delivery after waiting for 5 months. My 2014, white edition petrol sportage can stay a little longer, this was my own story and i know it is scant reading for those having problems but get in their face, no one should spend 35k on a car that looks pretty but chokes itself at every given opportunity. On a lighter note, neighbour has a Honda civic, 2019, 1.5L turbo sport plus model, he didn't even know it had a gpf and in 3 years has had no problems, so there are makes out there that can passive regen with no problem. Sorry it`s a bit long winded, until i see a positive upturn from the manufacturers the money stays in the bank and the old girl is getting a valet!!
Stay safe peeps
 

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On Order: Sportage GT Line S PHEV in Infra Red
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Just wonder why I need to know about the regeneration. Can this not take place on the quiet? All those error icons 馃槀
Its supposed to happen on the quiet, if it doesnt happen correctly then it tells you about it. Also it might need you to do a longer run or something similar to allow it to perform the regen.
 

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^^^
I agree with dhb. None of this should be happening with a properly running system and you would likely never notice any regen occurring.
The system generally will have a trigger point below max which should trigger a regen. The regen will just happen automatically. The alarm will trigger when any regen has failed; the filter is now over the first limit but not to the level requiring a forced regen. It then asks you to do a long run as seen in the pix earlier. If this fails the filter will eventually get to overload, the car will likely go to limp mode and require the 'forced regen' that needs workshop job.
Since the OP hasn't reported anything beyond that first warning it looks like system issues.
So something is adrift here. I would guess systems, sensors etc most likely because if not then the design of the exhaust system or the design/capability of the filter itself must be incorrect for the car and its service environment. (e.g. short journeys, stop start etc which in Europe is very common)
I wonder whether there is any info on cars which have had a replacement filter fitted and ended up with the same issue?
 

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Just to add to the above. This is a short outline of how the GPF is supposed to work. A little different from a DPF but in essence (no pun intended) the same just all done as a 'passive regen'. (no additional regen as with diesels). Thus you would never normally notice.

To initiate regeneration, the catalyst converter is fed with air for short periods. This oxygen, combined with high exhaust temperatures (400 - 700掳C), leads to soot ignition. Where engines operate for long periods without deceleration, for example driving on a traffic-free motorway without any downhill slopes, engine control is required to initiate regeneration. In this case, the exhaust temperature is increased by delaying the spark timing and oxygen is made available by creating a lean fuel/air mixture.
 
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