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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,
thinking of moving over to a DCT Sportage once we are back to normality. Probably the 2016 to 2018 version. And probably the 1.7 or 2.0 diesel

Whilst i know a lot about VAG DCT's and BMW TC's, i realised i know nothing about Kia automatic boxes!
For example are they 6 speed? Do all auto's come with paddles too? Are they Kia/Hyundai inhouse developed boxes or sourced in from 3rd party? If so, who else use them?
Is the gear change nice and slick or can it be jerky?
Sealed for life or require transmission fluid change?

Generally any feedback/info on the auto boxes and your opinion if you have a DCT Kia Sporty.
Be particularly interested in comparison to VAG as I've had a number of VAG automatics and generally found them to excellent (when working!)

Thanks all (y)
 

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I was a little concerned by the VAG DCT issues whel I was contemplating my Sportage. I asked Honest John and was assured that the KIA/Hyundai box is not related to any other make - it is an in house design and seems to be very reliable. Changes are silky smooth but not as quick as the VW box (friend of mine had one and it was very impressive until he got through two gearboxes in 17,000 miles - that took the shine off it somewhat so he got shot of it quick). You will read some criticisms on here but many of them are about folk not being prepared to get a feel for the car and adjust their driving style to get the best out of it. My 2017 model has a 7 speed and has the flappy paddles but I very rarely feel the need to use them - I think that the changes are a little slower with the paddles than automatically - there seems to be a delay. There is also an up/down shifter on the gearstick when in manual mode.
 

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Generally any feedback/info on the auto boxes and your opinion if you have a DCT Kia Sporty.
Quite simply, I agree with the first responder although I am not a Sportage owner.

The 7-speed unit in my Optima is excellent and unlike the various torque convertor autos I have owned over the years, I actually enjoy fuel economy similar to the manual version.

Once understood, the DCT proves to be a rewarding and relaxing way to cover the miles, town or country, using just two pedals.

I have no hesitation in recommending the Hyundai/KIA implementation of DCT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was a little concerned by the VAG DCT issues whel I was contemplating my Sportage. I asked Honest John and was assured that the KIA/Hyundai box is not related to any other make - it is an in house design and seems to be very reliable. Changes are silky smooth but not as quick as the VW box (friend of mine had one and it was very impressive until he got through two gearboxes in 17,000 miles - that took the shine off it somewhat so he got shot of it quick). You will read some criticisms on here but many of them are about folk not being prepared to get a feel for the car and adjust their driving style to get the best out of it. My 2017 model has a 7 speed and has the flappy paddles but I very rarely feel the need to use them - I think that the changes are a little slower with the paddles than automatically - there seems to be a delay. There is also an up/down shifter on the gearstick when in manual mode.
Thanks Turnup. Good to know its in-house because as you say VAG DCT's are very good...until they go wrong!
Totally agree about driving style. Makes all the difference. Some people get an auto then drive it like they would a manual. Makes no sense.

And flappy paddles. Had them, used first day, as its something different, but never touched them again.

would all Sporty's therefore be 7 speed?
 

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I really don't know. I think the earlier ones were 6 and I seem to thnik that some later KIA boxes are 8 speed but this might not be the Sportage. I wouldn't get too hung up on how many gears there are - I;m sure that KIA match the engine torque characteristics to the transmission or vice versa.
 

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2020 Sportage GT-Line CRDi
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Would all Sporty's therefore be 7 speed?
I still have the specification sheet for the June 2017 Sportage. According to that the 1.6 T-GDi petrol and the 1.7 CRDi diesel have 7 speed DCT. The 2.0 CRDi (134 & 182bhp) have a 6 speed auto box.
 

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After over 50 yrs of driving manuals daily and never owning a DCT /auto I was a bit hesitant about buying a DCT ( no manual option available) but after a few weeks of of driving and owning for over 30 months I find the 7 speed to be a great refined drive and a pleasure to use.
 

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As long as you don't expect anything near as good a proper slushbox, you'll be fine... ;) :p

You might find this video informative [I know post watchers, second time this week I've linked to it]

If you are glutton for punishment, John Cadogan Auto Expert has a few videos about DCTs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As long as you don't expect anything near as good a proper slushbox, you'll be fine... ;) :p

You might find this video informative [I know post watchers, second time this week I've linked to it]

If you are glutton for punishment, John Cadogan Auto Expert has a few videos about DCTs.
haha i have one of those in a BMW. Latest 8 speed version. And having had a few VAG DCT's i know the 'proper slushbox' is better in many ways. But the Sporty size equivalent of BMW is just too darn expensive!

But getting quite a few positives here about Kia DCT so ,more than likely will go ahead once lockdown is over and i can buy a car by actually test driving it first. Not a fan of this click and collect business for cars!

Seen a few people mention on other online forums that both Kia and Hyundai suffer from a jerky DCT clutches, especially when setting off in 1st, so want to avoid getting one of those.
Could be poor driving style of course, but rather be safe than sorry.
 

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haha i have one of those in a BMW. Latest 8 speed version. And having had a few VAG DCT's i know the 'proper slushbox' is better in many ways. But the Sporty size equivalent of BMW is just too darn expensive!

But getting quite a few positives here about Kia DCT so ,more than likely will go ahead once lockdown is over and i can buy a car by actually test driving it first. Not a fan of this click and collect business for cars!

Seen a few people mention on other online forums that both Kia and Hyundai suffer from a jerky DCT clutches, especially when setting off in 1st, so want to avoid getting one of those.
Could be poor driving style of course, but rather be safe than sorry.

Haven't seen posts on here about that. Mine picks up smoothly, even if I bury the accelerator.
 

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2020 Sportage 1.6 CRDi '4' DCT Mild Hybrid
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haha i have one of those in a BMW. Latest 8 speed version. And having had a few VAG DCT's i know the 'proper slushbox' is better in many ways. But the Sporty size equivalent of BMW is just too darn expensive!

But getting quite a few positives here about Kia DCT so ,more than likely will go ahead once lockdown is over and i can buy a car by actually test driving it first. Not a fan of this click and collect business for cars!

Seen a few people mention on other online forums that both Kia and Hyundai suffer from a jerky DCT clutches, especially when setting off in 1st, so want to avoid getting one of those.
Could be poor driving style of course, but rather be safe than sorry.
I to had the BMW 8 speed auto and for me that was about the only good thing about such a boring car. I to have driven the VAG DCT's but I prefer the DCT on my Kia Sportage CRDi MH, I just get smooth changes from selecting D.
My only criticisms are that there's no ECO select on mine, it's just Normal and Sport! Why, I don't know but it annoys me to death being stuck in a lower gear with engine braking when there's no need. In this sense it's very different to BMW's ECO mode where you'd be freewheeling at idle revs. Obviously with not having ECO mode I don't know how the Kia ECO mode is to use but just in case anyone is wondering about the freewheeling on the BMW, it will start to engine brake if you touch the brakes a couple of times or for a longer period.
I think not having the ECO mode is probably my only real gripe about the car.
 

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The DCT box in the Kia is ok. Nothing special - certainly not as responsive as a VAG DSG unit.
But doesn't seem to suffer the failures that the DSG units experience.
 

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I don’t particularly like the idea of DCT. There are just too many potentially wearing parts in an ostensively manual transmission that is robotised and changes its synchromesh ratios constantly in the background, anticipating from one second to the next whether the next change is going to be up or down a ratio.
However I am nothing if not open to try stuff, so I succumbed to the temptation of a new generation Sonata with the new Hyundai Group wet clutch DCT8. Would never buy a dry clutch version, because from many years experience with dry and wet clutches, that even driven sensibly a wet clutch will last about five times longer.

Don’t know about their other boxes or long term but my short experience so far with this box is very positive. It is a very slick shifter and despite very rapid changes indeed, they are somehow exceptionally well damped, so i only really notice a rapid change on the rev counter. Starts from standstill are also as smooth as if it has a torque converter and I can’t really tell when clutch slip stops to when drive is direct and solid. The basic thing to remember is that these DCT transmissions do have clutches and that these are wearing parts, particularly but not only dry clutches, whichever is fitted.
Yes, epicyclic [conventional] automatics have many wet clutches inside but they don’t start off from a standstill using clutch slip for smoothness, instead they let the near wear free fluid coupling take up the drive and indeed to smooth out ratio changes, which are themselves done at the time you see them done, not in anticipation, forever guessing whether up or down and pre-engaging like a DCT.
 

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Haven't seen posts on here about that. Mine picks up smoothly, even if I bury the accelerator.
There are quite a few posts in various threads scattered around the forum. Mostly people complain about the clutch judder starting off when cold. Manual 1.7d's seem to be the main culprits but it does happen on the DCT box especially when pulling off from cold under load. i.e. starting off up a hill.
 

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I don’t particularly like the idea of DCT. There are just too many potentially wearing parts in an ostensively manual transmission that is robotised and changes its synchromesh ratios constantly in the background, anticipating from one second to the next whether the next change is going to be up or down a ratio.
However I am nothing if not open to try stuff, so I succumbed to the temptation of a new generation Sonata with the new Hyundai Group wet clutch DCT8. Would never buy a dry clutch version, because from many years experience with dry and wet clutches, that even driven sensibly a wet clutch will last about five times longer.

Don’t know about their other boxes or long term but my short experience so far with this box is very positive. It is a very slick shifter and despite very rapid changes indeed, they are somehow exceptionally well damped, so i only really notice a rapid change on the rev counter. Starts from standstill are also as smooth as if it has a torque converter and I can’t really tell when clutch slip stops to when drive is direct and solid. The basic thing to remember is that these DCT transmissions do have clutches and that these are wearing parts, particularly but not only dry clutches, whichever is fitted.
Yes, epicyclic [conventional] automatics have many wet clutches inside but they don’t start off from a standstill using clutch slip for smoothness, instead they let the near wear free fluid coupling take up the drive and indeed to smooth out ratio changes, which are themselves done at the time you see them done, not in anticipation, forever guessing whether up or down and pre-engaging like a DCT.
Agree on wet clutches - common on motorcycles and rare indeed on motorcars - I wonder why?

Well I wonder if they in fact do pre-engage - as you say it would be hard work on the selector process - driver input and gradient changes forever dithering over which ratio is to be next. I don't know in detail how they work but if I were designing such a box I would let the ratio set not-in-use simply be in N and then I can very quickly select the "up" or "down" ratio when I decide that I definitely need it. This has the small advantage of disengaging the not-in-use gear set so it is not turning thus saving a little frictional and turbulence losses. This has a possible downside in that it will be becessary to allow a little time for the synchro to align the next gear but, on mine at least, the changes are not all that fast and anyway it takes time for the engine rpm to adjust before engagement of the other clutch.. I have never witnessed my DCT "jump" ratios (e.g. 2 to 4 in one change) so whatever gear is currently engaged there is only a choice of two for the next gear.
 
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