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Anyone use diesel dpf cleaner in the fuel. If so which one, and do they work.
 

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I used catclean 6160 when I had a Saab diesel as the filter was always blocking owing to short journey use, I think it helped, combined with a 40 min blast down the motorway in 3 rd gear to get it nice and hot. The thing that really solved the problem was to use premium diesel when filling the tank , flipping expensive but it solved the blocking and warning light issues, but it was the reason we sold the car in the end, we just didn’t do the miles in it that a diesel needs, now have a nice Niro phev, no such worries.
 

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I've yet to see a test showing these fuel additives actually do anything, if there's one out there I'd love a link.
I've seen videos suggesting that TERRACLEAN works in unblocking DPFs, including measurements of the exhaust back pressure before and after showing the exhaust is flowing like new again.
But some still claim a DPF cannot be unblocked successfully in-situ using chemicals.
 

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Anyone use diesel dpf cleaner in the fuel. If so which one, and do they work.
If they were any benefit Kit would market one and make it a warranty requirement that it was part of the annual service.

But they don't so like most of us know already they are simply snake oil for the gullible.

Read your handbook, in our Ceed handbook (and all others since and before) it clearly says that providing you use the approved spec oil and fuels no additives are required, some go as far as to say they could damage the car and affect the warranty.

Had 2 diesels with DPF's and never used additives and never had an issue. Had one for 5 1/2 years and did about 40,000 miles, less than is ideal. It just kept regenerating as required and passing its MOT's.

Just drive the the thing normally.
 

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I looked into terraclean and if I had kept the car I would have given it a try, I am under the impression that the only way to solve the dpf Filter blockage issue is to be a relatively high mileage driver, if your not be prepared for mot failure on emissions for a start.
 

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DPF replacement isn't as expensive as some would have you believe, anyone paying £1500 (or whatever) at a main dealer is a fool.
There are companies will sell you a clean one on an exchange basis.
There are aftermarket suppliers that will do you a new one for a couple of hundred (why pay £££ for Kia parts when it's just a tin can!).
Over X thousand miles, a few hundred quid to replace a DPF isn't something that stresses me.
 

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I agree dealer prices are just a rip off as you get the same warranty with a cheaper one, but I do think that before you purchase a diesel car you need to think about the mileage you are driving if you a short journey car owner then a petrol vehicle is probably more suitable, just my personal opinion.
 

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I agree dealer prices are just a rip off as you get the same warranty with a cheaper one, but I do think that before you purchase a diesel car you need to think about the mileage you are driving if you a short journey car owner then a petrol vehicle is probably more suitable, just my personal opinion.
True, but our personal experience of short journey diesel car usage has been fine for decades, no DPF problems at all (Ford/Renault/Hyundai/BMW etc.)
We do the occasional longer run, but not that often.
And the rest of the time we enjoy the better MPG of the diesel, our driving would be horrible expensive in a petrol.
Some cars you've little choice, our imminent replacement for the Sportage is an Evoque and the entry-level model is diesel only.
 

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There have always been and always will be purveyors of various snake oil miracle cures for just about any ailment that afflicts your car, central heating system or your health. The great majority of them rely upon the user's desire for them to work, because if they admit that they do not work then they are also admitting that they have been had. The placebo effect applies to automotive products not because the car believes they work but because the user really wants to believe that they do work. Very few indeed have any science backing them and probably none can produce properly controlled lab results to back their claims.

If any of them worked at all well then the industry would embrace the concept. Contrary to popular belief most car manufacturers do want their customers to like their product. The industry's silence on the matter speaks volumes.
 

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True, but our personal experience of short journey diesel car usage has been fine for decades, no DPF problems at all (Ford/Renault/Hyundai/BMW etc.)
We do the occasional longer run, but not that often.
And the rest of the time we enjoy the better MPG of the diesel, our driving would be horrible expensive in a petrol.
We drove diesels from 1996 to 2005. 2 had DPF's. Never had a single issue.

But now we both drive petrols, why, well DPF's have put me off diesels and modern Turbo Petrols are very different to the asthmatic and uneconomical petrols we drove before diesels.

Take my Skoda Superb 150 PS TSi. Over the 3 1/2 years we have had it its averaged 46 mpg in mixed driving. The Ceed was the best diesel for mpg we have owned and over 5 years it averaged 51mpg in roughly the same use as the Superb but HJ Real mpg suggests 55 mpg so I will use that figure.

So over a year and 7,000 miles at current prices the Superb would cost us £712 in petrol. The 150 PS TDi Superb at 55 mpg would cost us £630 in diesel, a saving of £82. Considering the 150 TDi is £1385 more expensive than the 150PS TDi it would take many years to recoup the saving and if any DPF issues occurred the break even would be even longer even if a cheapo replacement was available.

If I was towing most weekends like we used to in the 90's it would probably be a different story but not with our current use.

There are aftermarket suppliers that will do you a new one for a couple of hundred (why pay £££ for Kia parts when it's just a tin can!).
A DPF may be just a tin can but the internal matrix is coated with platinum which is why DPF's just like cats get stolen from parked cars.
 
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