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Asymmetric tyres are not the same as directional. Asymmetric means they have an ‘outside’ and an ‘inside’ which will be very clearly marked on the wall of the tyre. It is completely wrong to say that asymmetric tyres can’t be swapped left-right - the outside is still on the outside.

Some asymmetric tyres are also directional - in which case that advice would be true. These too will also be marked clearly on the sidewall, with an arrow indicating the direction they need to roll in. These are the tyres you can only move front to back. Don’t confuse the two types. Also, not all directional tyres are asymmetric. They are two completely different properties of the tyres.
I have never seen an asymmetrical tread which was not also directional, but I have to concede that such a thing might exist.

I have seen symmetrical tyres which were directional - my last car had those.
 

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The fronts will wear quite a bit faster than the rears because in normal use the car is front wheel drive. That advice is simply dead wrong. I swap front/back at around about 10k miles and this evens the wear so you get to replace all four when they are all worn down. If you just leave the fronts on the front they will wear down to the point that the AWD starts to kick in and at the very least this will then start to wear all four tyres quickly and potentially damage the transmission. I really don't know what degree of wear difference is tolerable but I have heard/read somewhere the 2 or 3 mm figures. I can't see how to verify this and I am not about to try the experiment on my own car. It would not take rocket science for the car to learn about it's tyre wear differences and compensate the AWD trigger accordingly.
yeah that’s what I thought as that’s why I enquired about it so it could be done along with service but they advised it wasn’t necessary.

in your opinions then when service is due, should I ask them again just to go ahead with the rotation even though they advise not too?

ive not enquired at independent tyre places yet on how much they’d charge but kia garage I spoke to was just over £50 if I was to go ahead and rotate.
 

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The usual tyres for the Sportage have an asymmetric tread and cannot be swapped side to side without taking them off the wheels. They must rotate in the specified direction which is marked on the side wall. I would expecct any tyre bay to know this so are your old tyres not of the asymmetric tread type?
You are mistaking asymmetric with directional. The original Continental tyres on my Sportage are NOT directional (but ARE asymmetric).
Directional tyres cannot be swapped left to right without taking off the rim and refitting.
Asymmetric tyres absolutely can.
 

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yeah that’s what I thought as that’s why I enquired about it so it could be done along with service but they advised it wasn’t necessary.

in your opinions then when service is due, should I ask them again just to go ahead with the rotation even though they advise not too?

ive not enquired at independent tyre places yet on how much they’d charge but kia garage I spoke to was just over £50 if I was to go ahead and rotate.
It's easy enough to do it yourself or go to a tyre specialist and they will probably beat the KIA dealer price.

What remaining tread is on the fronts and backs?
 

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You are mistaking asymmetric with directional. The original Continental tyres on my Sportage are NOT directional (but ARE asymmetric).
Directional tyres cannot be swapped left to right without taking off the rim and refitting.
Asymmetric tyres absolutely can.
We covered that already - or are you being deliberately provocative?

I have never seen an asymmetrical tread which was not also directional, but I have to concede that such a thing might exist.

I have seen symmetrical tyres which were directional - my last car had those.
 

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137699 said
Directional tyres cannot be swapped left to right without taking off the rim and refitting.
Asymmetric tyres absolutely can.

That depends which website you choose to read (see my post #7 -
You can rotate your asymmetrical tires from front to back on the same side of the car, but not from one side to the other)
.and believe. As with lot's of things motoring related there is a lot of conflicting advice on the web. Perhaps the best answer is if you are unsure look for the rotational markings on the outside tyre wall and before swapping ensure they will still be showing forward rotation?
 

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My original front tyres wore down far quicker (less than 2mm at 18k miles) than the rears on my FWD version, but no sign of feathering or any uneven wear on the rears (still over 4mm tread depth). Fitted the rears to the front to allow the new tyres to be fitted to the rear and - as said - the TPMS system fairly quickly picks up the new locations. Original Hankooks were/are not directional.
 

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It's easy enough to do it yourself or go to a tyre specialist and they will probably beat the KIA dealer price.
It's not easy enough for your average DIY'er with probably only the one car jack.
And, if it's 19" wheels you have, the Kia jack really is only just up the job.:oops:
It's really at the end of it's threads before the wheels are comfortably clear of the deck.
 

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I have changed a wheel on my 19" wheel Sporty using the supplied jack and I recall no difficulties (apart from dodging the traffic whistling past my bum) and it did not take very long.. OK you have to raise and lower the car 6 times to rotate all four. Speaking personally, I would be happy to pay a tyre bay to do it but it is an option. You seem to have a low opinion of the average DIYer but IMO many would not find this a challenging task, after all the supplied equipment is intended for the user.
 

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It's easy enough to do it yourself or go to a tyre specialist and they will probably beat the KIA dealer price.

What remaining tread is on the fronts and backs?
It’s not something I’d be comfortable with doing myself (even if it is a fairly easy job to do) I was wondering about tyre place but just thought if it was having a service then easier to get it all done in one go at dealers.

ok, so fronts are currently on about 5mm after 4500 miles and rears are on about 6mm. Service isn’t for another 3 months so is it best to keep an eye on and check prior to service and see what they are like and if there’s still life in the tyres at that point and tread is closer to 2mm difference between front and rears to go with the rotation or would you just advise to get tyre place or Kia to do the rotation anyway?

I’ve looked through handbook and they ‘recommend’ rotating tyres (can’t remember if it was 5000 miles or 7500 now) but there is no mention of consequences if it isn’t done.

majority of people will buy a car and probably not be a member of a forum and they will just drive it and take it to garage for services etc but if manual also doesn’t state about the tread difference between tyres then how can they expect everyone to be aware that it can and does cause problems and damage?
 

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With a difference of only 1 mm there is nothing to worry about. I would not ask a KIA dealer to rotate tyres, even though it is on the ramp anyway for the service they will charge you the book price for that job on its own in addition to the service price. All garages do this. When the time comes take it to a tyre bay and they will do it for a lot less than a dealer will ask, but by then you might be needing 2 or 4 new tyres anyway and if they are fitting tyres my experience is that the tyre bay will do that for no or minimal extra charge.
 

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I have changed a wheel on my 19" wheel Sporty using the supplied jack and I recall no difficulties (apart from dodging the traffic whistling past my bum) and it did not take very long.. OK you have to raise and lower the car 6 times to rotate all four. Speaking personally, I would be happy to pay a tyre bay to do it but it is an option. You seem to have a low opinion of the average DIYer but IMO many would not find this a challenging task, after all the supplied equipment is intended for the user.
It's not a 'difficult, job, but boy it's a pain in the ass.
That jack need a LOT of winding to get 19s off the ground.
And if you don't have axle stands, you've to put the space saver on before you can move the jack to the rear.
I'm all for DIY and avoiding giving dealers money, but £40-£50 is worth it.
 

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It's not a 'difficult, job, but boy it's a pain in the ass.
That jack need a LOT of winding to get 19s off the ground.
And if you don't have axle stands, you've to put the space saver on before you can move the jack to the rear.
I'm all for DIY and avoiding giving dealers money, but £40-£50 is worth it.
I normally fill the the open space between jack and ground with a piece of wood before winding, works just great at home on the drive for maintenance purposes and adds some security when stranded somewhere and having to lift the car on a dodgy soft underground. I keep some wood under the boot floor.
 

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TBH I've got a hydraulic trolley jack that would do it in a fraction of the time.
But I'm not overly sure where the correct points are to use that on the Sportage, so I tend to do the jacking with the scissor and then just use the trolley to lightly touch a crossmember in case the scissor collapses..
I can't use the trolley on the scissor jack points, the flat round plate of the trolley wouldn't be good against the sharp ridge of the sills.
I should have asked for trolley jack points on here, but too late now..
 

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It's not a 'difficult, job, but boy it's a pain in the ass.
That jack need a LOT of winding to get 19s off the ground.
The jack may well be rubbish but the difficulty of the job is nothing to do with the size of the rims. The Sportage wheels all have the same rolling radius, you could have the 16" rims fitted like on the base model, but because the sidewalls are so much taller they all end up the same diameter in the end.
 

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The jack may well be rubbish but the difficulty of the job is nothing to do with the size of the rims. The Sportage wheels all have the same rolling radius, you could have the 16" rims fitted like on the base model, but because the sidewalls are so much taller they all end up the same diameter in the end.
I'm afraid that's not so.
Please see calculations below
Remember tyre width is in mm and the profile is expressed as a percentage of the width.
So, for example, a 225/40 tyre is 225mm wide and the height is 40% of the width (so 90mm)

17inch wheels = 432mm
Tyre size is 225/60, which means a sidewall size of 135mms
So wheel + sidewall = 567mm

19 inch wheel = 483mm
Tyre size is 245/45 which means a sidewall size of 110mm
So wheel + sidewall = 593mm

So 26mm difference between 17 inch and 19 inch.
It's not a big difference, I grant you, but the scissor jack does get very 'upright' before the 19s get off the ground.
I feel anyway.
 

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I'm afraid that's not so.
Please see calculations below
Remember tyre width is in mm and the profile is expressed as a percentage of the width.
So, for example, a 225/40 tyre is 225mm wide and the height is 40% of the width (so 90mm)

17inch wheels = 432mm
Tyre size is 225/60, which means a sidewall size of 135mms
So wheel + sidewall = 567mm

19 inch wheel = 483mm
Tyre size is 245/45 which means a sidewall size of 110mm
So wheel + sidewall = 593mm

So 26mm difference between 17 inch and 19 inch.
It's not a big difference, I grant you, but the scissor jack does get very 'upright' before the 19s get off the ground.
I feel anyway.
I'm running the 16" and the diameter is 708mm
 

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Go run those tyre sizes through an online wheel size converter, and tell me again there’s a 26mm difference...
 

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Go run those tyre sizes through an online wheel size converter, and tell me again there’s a 26mm difference...
Time to go home, I don't bother with this website in my own time.
I'm not sure what part of my calculation is wrong, I stand to be corrected.
 

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dont know if it’s been mentioned but with feathering the first thing to do is to get all 4 wheels aligned,it can save you a fortune ,it’s a known thing on some models and any good tyre company should offer this service when seeing feathering And fitting new tyres.
 
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