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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my turbo is gone on my 08 plate, and due to tech hitches kia wont cover it. I can get this done my self but parts companies are asking for model number on the turbo and no idea how I get this.


Its one thing after another with the car.
 

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Tech "Hitches"??? Like?


The onlyfew reasons a turbo lets go can be is...Poor manufacture (which usually shows within the first few hundred miles)

Poor maintence, oil changes cleaning ect but obviously this cant be the case else without servicing you wouldnt have a warranty anyway.

Modifying the engine to work above determined parameters, tuning ect

Or just plain abusing the engine from cold or thrashing it?
 

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davy said:
Or not letting the turbo cool down before switching engine off
Good point didn't think of that. BUT I've realised in the ceed you can (what I think it is) hear the oil pump for about another 30odd seconds after the engine has turned off. My passat used to do it to, althought that was 100% the oil pump recirculating oil to the turbo as part of the ECU programming. The reason I know for sure was that when the wife was picking little one from school a couple of years back... It carried on untill the battery died. Compleatly!
 

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I think the noise you probably heard was the regulator kill flap just under the EGR valve. Its worked with an electric motor and when you switch engine off it closes and stops any air from getting into engine and then opens again when engine has stopped. These have a common fault as in they stick or the gears inside the unit strip and eventually the motor fails.
I have a Leon 2.0PD 140bhp TDI and there is nothing in the workshop manual to say the oil pump runs after engine has stopped. The oil pump is driven from the crankshaft by a small chain so is totally mechanical.
The turbo bearings are fed by pressured oil from engine when its running and the oil returns by gravity back into the engine. When the engine is switched off oil stops going to the bearings and most of the oil falls back into the engine so the bearings can run dry as the turbo is still spinning long after the engine has stopped and this causes bearing wear. That is why you should let the engine idle for a minute or so so that the turbo speed slows down. Turbos normally spin at about 60k to 70k revs so you can see how they can run out of oil.



Edited by: davy
 
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