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My Mrs car is showing cam position sensor is causing engine management light to illuminate - going to change both - where are they? Thank you in advance.
 

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What engine is in your car..the info will help people when they give you an answer.. 馃檪
 

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You say in the title its a 2019 Picanto, if it is its should still be under warranty so off to the dealer.

But you have posted in the 2011 to 2017 section which means it could well be out of warranty.

Please post exactly what the car is, without correct info people cannot help.
 

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If it's any consolation, we had one replaced on the wife's MINI Cooper Coup茅 MY14 about 3 years ago and the part was about 拢40 plus a quarter of an hour labour I recall.

As to what they are, on the MINI (joint BMW/Peugot engine) it is part of the variable valve injection system. So I'm guessing that the Picanto is a VVI engine, but the others will correct me if I'm wrong.

Anyway, you don't need to go to a dealer, unless it's under warranty I guess, to have it done, a quick and easy job I'm told.

Stingbank
 

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As to what they are, on the MINI (joint BMW/Peugot engine) it is part of the variable valve injection system. So I'm guessing that the Picanto is a VVI engine, but the others will correct me if I'm wrong.
The Ford Zetec 1.8 and 2 litre used in the Escort, Focus and Mondeo from about 1992 to 2004 all had a cam position sensor but the only version with VVT was the Focus ST.

In all those engines it was used by the fuel injection system which was a sequential type (one injector at a time). Earlier injected engine used grouped injection (all together) and did not need a cam position sensor.
 

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The Ford Zetec 1.8 and 2 litre used in the Escort, Focus and Mondeo from about 1992 to 2004 all had a cam position sensor but the only version with VVT was the Focus ST.

In all those engines it was used by the fuel injection system which was a sequential type (one injector at a time). Earlier injected engine used grouped injection (all together) and did not need a cam position sensor.
Not knowledgeable on the Ford units but a bit puzzled. If I have understood correctly it fires all injectors together? So it injects on all cyls at the same time?
 

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Not knowledgeable on the Ford units but a bit puzzled.
This does not relate to Ford units, its the same for all brands.

If I have understood correctly it fires all injectors together? So it injects on all cyls at the same time?
The older way of doing it was indeed to fire all injectors together, grouped injection. It may sound wrong to inject fuel into the intake track of a cylinder that is not on the intake stroke but in reality it just sits there until the intake valve opens and its sucked in. The injectors only have to inject 1/4 of the fuel needed each time. At high revs things are happening very quickly and this way of doing it does not have a real drawback but at low revs the fuel droplets sat in the intake tracts tend to join together to make bigger drops and when these are drawn into the cylinder they do not burn as cleanly or produce as much power. This was acceptable to manufacturers 30 years ago (it was way better than carburettors) but as emission rules tightened up it became necessary to move to sequential injection (one at a time) to ensure the droplets were small and burned cleanly.

We have a car at home that started life in the 80's with an ancient 2 litre engine on a single twin choke carb producing 99 bhp, 0-60 in about a week and doing about 25 mpg. Same car now has a modern 16valve 2 litre engine (totally standard) other than it is working through a nice free flowing exhaust and aftermarket throttle bodies (no room for the standard injection stuff) and ECU. It fires the injectors all at the same time and with about 175 bhp goes very well indeed. Best bit is (and a little bit unexpected), it does about 36 mpg. Even with grouped injection it has no issues with the MOT since it still only has to meet the numbers required for the original car which were 3.5% CO at idle, in July at the MOT it was reading 1.5% CO at idle. In its original home with 134 bhp, sequential injection, restrictive exhaust (with a CAT fitted) it would have been certified at 0.5% at idle.In truth it would meet the requirements of a much newer car if needed with some additional kit. But its not necessary so why do it.
 

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OK so I think I have got it. The injectors do not inject into the cylinder but into the intake manifold so fuel only reaches the cylinder on induction and the rest lurks in the manifold awaiting another induction stroke. Is that correct?
 

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OK so I think I have got it. The injectors do not inject into the cylinder but into the intake manifold so fuel only reaches the cylinder on induction and the rest lurks in the manifold awaiting another induction stroke. Is that correct?
That is correct. But to add a complication its only correct for an indirect injection engine and that is what I am referring to.

In a direct injection engine (both diesel and petrol) the fuel is injected directly into the cylinder.

Cannot think of any indirect diesels these days, only ever had one and it had the power/torque of a slug (even with a turbo).

Some manufacturers still make indirect petrols (pretty sure Toyota Hybrids are examples) and these engines still have one huge advantage. They produce less Nitros Oxide and do not require PPF filters. Another example was the Suzuki Celerio, got the uncle one last year. No PPF is one less thing to worry about.
 

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Back again, really interesting stuff and thanks for sharing it with us.
Can you remind me what VVT means again, Variable Valve Timing?
I鈥檓 pretty sure BMW/Peugot called it VVI in the Prince engine in our MINI. The 鈥淚鈥 bring Injection I believe.

Stingbank
 

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Manufacturers have given their systems various names the most notable probably being Honda with their VTEC engines. At the end of the day the letters do not matter, its the end result.
 
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