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Xceed 1.5 4 DCT
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There is a lot of confusion regarding this between a piggyback device and a flash map. Where this device differes from a flash map, ECU data is not overwritten. Logged parameters are also not shown higher than stock, if the ECU did see paramaters higher than stock, it would either throw an error or simply trim back values to get back to stock power output.

As a result, you can pull a log from the ECU and everything looks within normal bounds.
I 'hear what you say' but I would not be prepared to take the risk myself.

It is very easy to make sweeping claims that your product will not leave a trace but I do not believe that Bluespark have enough knowledge of every manufacturers ECU to make that claim, furthermore there are many reports of similar devices (not from Bluespark I'm sure) on occasion putting cars into Limp mode precisely because they have exceeded a parameters limits. It is one thing to fool the cars systems to say boost the fuel rail pressure but it is quite another to manipulate the actual reading that the fuel rail reports back to the ECU, are you quite certain that your systems does this? Given that the ECU also records all manor or other data that is a consequence of the power boost are you saying that Bluesparks tuning box also manipulates all of these as well.

This is why although you can quickly remove the physical evidence of a tuning box I think a manufacturer can see the evidence if they look hard enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
It is one thing to fool the cars systems to say boost the fuel rail pressure but it is quite another to manipulate the actual reading that the fuel rail reports back to the ECU, are you quite certain that your systems does this?
In instances where we are modfiying the fuel pressure (not actually the case in this instance), I am 100% sure that the fuel pressure value reported back to the ECU is changed. Its fundamentally how the device works.

I understand where you are coming from. I also understand that tuning your car isn't for everyone, just like any hobby or interest really.
 

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we are all adults and the decision is clear yes or a no , yes if you like the idea and no if your a worrier ,i would install one ,insurance should be informed ,but as for kia you pay your money take the chance , i would for sure ,its no good questioning blue sparks motives ,they are upfront about all aspects of there boxes , and its up to the purchasers to then comply or not .
 

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I debated whether to fit one of these when I first got my car. As said, removal of the device before a service is a 15 minute job, however as I have my insurance (and the RAC breakdown) through Kia, advising them would not have been perhaps wise! If taking a chance on not advising them, and then suffering a breakdown, where they guarantee recovery would be to a Kia approved garage, and only genuine Kia replacement parts fitted (keeping the 7 year warranty intact), could be another minefield if said box was reported being fitted.

The heart still wants one, the head says no :confused:
 

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Ok folks. Comments have been made on warranty & service plans.
Let that be a end of this. There is no need for further discussion on this matter.
Buyers of the product will make their own mind up on what they do.

So lets stay on topic. THANKS>
 

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Just for Australians, without wanting to throw a further spanner in the works, technically (from a roadworthy inspection perspective) you can't increase the power of a stock vehicle by more than 20% without requiring an engineering certification from a qualified certifier. I'm just the messenger but back when I had a Polo in 2012 I never went ahead with a third party tune as it exceeded the limit. But there was one tuner aware of the limitations and I recall they deliberately increased the power by 19% but gave you a very nice fat midrange.

Perhaps this is something tuning providers could bear in mind. There is no rule about torque increases - just power increases ;) Nothing top stop you having a tuning option that gives you a nice torque increase in the low to midrange but then tapers it off so as to not add more than 19% additional maximum power output.

And yes, I know it is a stupid rule but on the other hand I guess you have to draw a line in the sand somewhere. You only have to compare a turbo car on a stinking hot and dry day in the middle of summer at altitude with one in very cold humid weather near sea level and you already have a substantial variation.

I am only mentioning this as it has nothing whatsoever to do with warranties but could potentially be an insurance snag because insurers require that your car is technically able to pass a roadworthy.

Other countries would have other laws so I only know the situation in Australia. In the case of the Picanto GT, that effectively limits any modification to producing around 90 Kw or 120 hp maximum.
 

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In instances where we are modfiying the fuel pressure (not actually the case in this instance), I am 100% sure that the fuel pressure value reported back to the ECU is changed. Its fundamentally how the device works.

I understand where you are coming from. I also understand that tuning your car isn't for everyone, just like any hobby or interest really.
Any idea what makes the new engine 15BHP higher on your box then the old one?

Kinda a bit jealous :<
 

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Just for Australians, without wanting to throw a further spanner in the works, technically (from a roadworthy inspection perspective) you can't increase the power of a stock vehicle by more than 20% without requiring an engineering certification from a qualified certifier. I'm just the messenger but back when I had a Polo in 2012 I never went ahead with a third party tune as it exceeded the limit. But there was one tuner aware of the limitations and I recall they deliberately increased the power by 19% but gave you a very nice fat midrange.

Perhaps this is something tuning providers could bear in mind. There is no rule about torque increases - just power increases ;) Nothing top stop you having a tuning option that gives you a nice torque increase in the low to midrange but then tapers it off so as to not add more than 19% additional maximum power output.

And yes, I know it is a stupid rule but on the other hand I guess you have to draw a line in the sand somewhere. You only have to compare a turbo car on a stinking hot and dry day in the middle of summer at altitude with one in very cold humid weather near sea level and you already have a substantial variation.

I am only mentioning this as it has nothing whatsoever to do with warranties but could potentially be an insurance snag because insurers require that your car is technically able to pass a roadworthy.

Other countries would have other laws so I only know the situation in Australia. In the case of the Picanto GT, that effectively limits any modification to producing around 90 Kw or 120 hp maximum.
In the UK, this is what I did, not sure it helps you in Aus ...no restriction as long as you insure for it here.


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Whilst most insurers in Australia will allow you to insure a modification (by telling them specifically about it and paying extra if required), the vehicle still has to be road registerable. And that is where it falls down in Australia because of that 20% rule in terms of being to be legally registered. As I say, you can get around it perfectly legally by getting an engineering certifcation but unless you are talking about something so exotic (as in if you have to ask the price you can't afford it sort of vehicle), it just isn't worth the hassle or the money involved for an every day current model mass produced car. Keep it under 20% and you are fine (though you still have to tell the insurer about it).
 

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Whilst most insurers in Australia will allow you to insure a modification (by telling them specifically about it and paying extra if required), the vehicle still has to be road registerable. And that is where it falls down in Australia because of that 20% rule in terms of being to be legally registered.
Rules vary considerably from state to state here in Australia, but either way this is easily solved, if anyone is concerned.
Just use setting C or D on the Bluespark unit and you will be under 20% horse power increase, but you can still enjoy the very significant boost on low RPM torque. Unit has 5 stages of adjustment.
 

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Rules vary considerably from state to state here in Australia, but either way this is easily solved, if anyone is concerned.
Just use setting C or D on the Bluespark unit and you will be under 20% horse power increase, but you can still enjoy the very significant boost on low RPM torque. Unit has 5 stages of adjustment.
Excellent. Thanks for pointing that out. I am very glad they have the option - that is not so clear just looking at the website.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Excellent. Thanks for pointing that out. I am very glad they have the option - that is not so clear just looking at the website.
Just for additional clarity, if anyone requires a specific setup for any reason we can always accomodate this. This is our product, designed and made in Britain from the "ground up" so any change to the mapping (or anything else within reason) on request is always possible.
 

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Edd,

I am curious about one thing. Do these Kia / Hyundai engines you work with adapt to the fuel octane they use? For example, they are all meant to run on (I think) either 91 or 95 octane here in Australia but I am curious if they advance the timing if they detect a higher octane fuel such as 98 (even without your re-maps).
 

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Edd,

I am curious about one thing. Do these Kia / Hyundai engines you work with adapt to the fuel octane they use? For example, they are all meant to run on (I think) either 91 or 95 octane here in Australia but I am curious if they advance the timing if they detect a higher octane fuel such as 98 (even without your re-maps).
I never noticed any improvement in range by using 98 over 95 but can sometimes get a spark retard in certain conditions if i don't use 98. This is with power box fitted on highest setting!
 

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Titanium Silver Kia Picanto GT-Line S 1.0 TGDI
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I have had the Bluespark box in my 1.0 TGDI now for almost 15,000 miles.
Had no problem what so ever.
Tried settings C,D & E.
I do prefer the low down power delivery with the box on. On my commute to work I am getting about 300 miles to a tank.
I use the ZX1 metal treatment in my engine every 10,000 miles. If it's good enough for the engine builder Allen Millyard then it's good enough for me.
Also I have been using 50ML of Miller's Ecomax Petrol Additive/octane booster.
This stuff really works.
I tend to run Shell V Power or 97 Octane from Sainsbury's.
Also look at the almost full jam jar of gunk my sealed oil catch can has caught over 10,000 miles.
I checked my throttle body the other day it is certainly more cleaner.
In my opinion I would say it works.
 

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