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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone out there in Kialand know if when you hit snow and ice in the new FE and the AWD automatically kicks in,how do you know all 4 wheels are turning-does a light on the dash come on? Also what if you're travelling at speed-does the AWD still kick in? I read on this forum that if you put the 50/50 lock on you can't really exceed 25mph or you risk screwing up the transmission so am wondering what happens if you're going faster than 25mph and hit ice. Cheers Johnathan
 

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Hey Johnathan, don't worry - the system takes care of everything for you. As I understand it, the centre diff lock (which is what splits the torque 50/50 front/back) only works up until 25mph, then most likely it switches itself off automatically after that. With no diff locked, the system still has various gizmos looking after you that will do something like apply the brake very slightly to any spinning wheel, whatever speed you're going at. It's not that the AWD "kicks in" - it's always got the capability to provide power to all 4 wheels, regardless of speed, but in most circumstances it'll drive just the front ones, until needs be the back will get some oomph as well. The diff lock just takes some of the automation out of things. I should imagine that 99% of us who drive these, will never actually need the diff lock at all...

It's a clever system :)
 

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Hi Jules,


There is no central diff to lock. The lock button manually selects 4WD with a 50/50 split of power to both axles. Because there is no central diff, locking the transmission this waywill cause transmission wind-up on good surfaces as the axles will end-up rotating at different speeds as soon as the vehicle makes a turn. The wind-up is felt in the steering which will jerk. This is why you shouldn't lock the transmission on good going and also why the lock cuts out automatically around 20 MPH. Otherwise I agree with you....it's an automatic system managed by gizmos.



Richard
 

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OK OK so technically it's a viscous coupling and not a traditional diff, right? But there's still some torque available to the back wheels at more than 25mph... that's the point I was trying to make...
 

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Discussion Starter #5
WOW- thanks guys for all your technical know-how,much appreciated. Well it seems I don't have to worry as everything will "kick in" when its needed automatically. I know of course that in icy or snowy conditions only a fool would be travelling fast. In a way I'm rather looking forward to slippery roads but will still be careful. Cheers Johnathan
 

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Just remember, 4wd or awd or whatever is awesome for getting going but braking is no different to being in a fwd car...
 

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Richard the link did not work for me but I did find the video with google.
It shows the new Sportage demonstrating the system but I am assuming it is in the previous model also.
 

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The Mk2/2G/KM 4WD system is not as sophisticated (or complex) as the system on the new model. It does work 'on demand' and uses a central clutch to engage the rear axle when slippage is detected on the front axle. As far as I can tell from the information on the web, it's more of an 'all or nothing' system. By that I mean if a front wheel loses traction the rear axle is engaged with 50% of the torque. The Dynamax on the new model would appear to be able to transfer torque more flexibly to individual wheels - using a lot of electronics. Personally, I'm happy with the relatively simple system but it is set-up for 'sensible' driving on mud or snow rather than fast cornering on wet roads.


Richard
 
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