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Discussion Starter #1
I am all for development and worked quite well with tuning companies over the last 10 years and I have just spoken with Superchips and they are interested in having a GT to see what developments they can get from remapping the ECU.

Firstly though they need someone with a GT to pop in to Superchips HQ near Silverstone to see if their equipment can talk with the car. I am in Yorkshire and would happily do it but wondered if anyone else based closer would be willing to pop in?
 

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Hadn't really thought about it tbh. I'm quite happy the way it is. Plus, no idea if anywhere upo by me would touch it!
 

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Paul,

I think you should make a weekend of it.
Get the chip map done then you can report back how good/bad it is.

When you next have a service and Kia do a software update it will all be gone, won't it?




Edited by: TerryB58
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You guys round here are funny.

Kia have opened the door to a whole new type of client with the release of the GT so I hope you guys on this forum are ready for a few more posts like this along the way and hopefully you won't shoot everyone who asks the questions down as that wouldn't be very welcoming would it.

Anyway, in response to your question TerryB58, maybe you will lose it maybe you won't but I am guessing with companies like superchips and others making money from selling ecu remaps that the answer is likely not to your question. Also they do products like bluefin where you have a device which you just plug in to your diagnostic port and upload the chipped data. The dealer updates the ECU then you just re-install your data.
 

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Fair enough.

It's your money, you takes your chance

Just wonder what the insurance make of it all.

A mod like that needs to be reported to the insurance, failure to do so invalidates your insurance which then, in the event of a serious accident (I hope you never have one) can cause major upset and financial loss to 3rd parties due to 'uninsured driver'.

But, like I say, it is your choice. Personally, if I wanted something more 'beefy etc' I would have purchased something else.

I am sure if you are the first for this company you will get a good discount, also with favourable reports more people will do it an the chip company will be very thankful to you.





Edited by: TerryB58
 

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Insurance is not a big issue, in the past I've had modified and tuned cars, there are 2 insurance companies I've used who are very mod friendly and not as expensive as you might think after declaring all modifications.
 

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Marveh said:
Insurance is not a big issue, in the past I've had modified and tuned cars, there are 2 insurance companies I've used who are very mod friendly and not as expensive as you might think after declaring all modifications.

Good to hear as 'modding' is big business.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Every car I have ever had and done 'mods' on has been declared to the insurance company. Their are specialist insurers out their who work closely with car modifiers and actually these companies sometimes don't even increase the premium on mods like remaps as alongside the power gains you also gain on fuel efficiency (more so on diesels). Along with those power mods were also things like better brakes and the insurance companies see that as a good thing too.

Truth be told, the pro'ceed GT is a steal for the money which is why I picked it. I was originally looking at Mercedes A-class but for the same power and spec of the kia it was 8k more.

When I had my first fabia vRS I had it remapped and afterwards the car gave back so much more. Not in top end speed but in low torque which let's be honest is the best kind of power for UK roads as you would be crazy to try for top end speeds in the UK other than in controlled environments like tracks etc.
 

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Hi Paul. There are always more than one school of thought about cars. Some will love to wring the last bit of power out of theirs, others will be happy with what they have got, and others will think their car is already too powerful, so don't despair that not everyone agrees with you. It is your car, and you do what you like with it! One of the salesmen, from the local dealer, lives round the corner from me and is using both a red and a white GT, but I can never catch him to have a chat about it. If I do, I will bend his ear on tuning.
 

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Me and two of my neighbours were talking about squeezing more power out of my Pro_Cee'd GT (one of them wants to buy one in red, actually) and we all came to the conclusion that before you touch the ECU, <i style="line-height: 1.4;">you should really be looking at other areas of the car first. [/i]Just mapping an ECU alone really isn't good enough in a modern turbo. Normally aspirated, yes, not a Turbo. You should really be getting more air into the engine and upping the compression ratio from its stock 9.5.

Swapping the air intake filter, the muffler or even the pre-cats to higher quality parts will allow better air flow. Do the muffler if you want your GT to sound like an absolute hooligan


Quite a lot of it will be to do with the exhaust system and although I have no doubt the one in the GT is a good system, it could probably be better since its technically a budget car. The car is too new for anyone to really know how much back-pressure is created by the stock exhaust, but on some cars you see as much as 40bhp recovered by doing nothing but fitting a performance exhaust. Even if it doesn't go as high as 40 (I doubt it will) you're relieving unnecessary stress from the engine which can only be a very good thing.

There's a previous generation Kia Pro_Cee'd with the old 2.0L petrol engine on YouTube with an aftermarket turbo pushing 0.6bar. That hits ~230bhp, a whopping 90bhp more than stock (138bhp)! Hyundai engines are quite well known for being good blocks but tuned down to abysmal levels for emissions reasons. The T-GDI should be no different.

We three think that with all that extra equipment in place + a remap you'd be looking at a healthy (IE: not stupid) 240~260bhp. That's Ford Focus ST territory. Using the rather unscientific method of "my friend with a stop watch" I've gotten my stock GT to 60 in 7s dead. Once the engine has a few thousand on it and you've allowed it to warm up for a bit (as in, the entire system has warmed through, not just the oil temp on the central dial, and the intercooler is good and cold) it allows the boost pressure to go as high 1.2bar (120kPa). I'd love to get this thing on a rolling road to see what its actually pushing out when the higher boost pressure kicks in. The Torque gauge also hits 300Nm as well. Those extra 5Nm go a long way.

If you don't want to start buying new suspension and/or break disks I'd say 230bhp would be the safe limit. It wont get the Megane 265 worried, but it'll be breathing down the neck of the Clio 200, 208 GTI and Ford Focus ST whilst leaving the VW triplets (Fabia VRS, Ibiza Cupra, Polo GTI), Fiesta ST and Golf GTD in its rear-view mirror.










Edited by: benanderson89
 

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If you read closely its actually a mod for Diesel engines, and what it actually does is fool the ECU into thinking the Common Rail is running at a lower pressure than it actually is, so the engine increases the pressure to the rail, therefore boosting torque. I've enquired about this before for my dad's SUV since he does a LOT of motorwayjourneys.

Anyoneexperiencedwith the oily bits I asked said to avoid them. Not only does it push up your emissions its also bad for the engine. It raises the pressure but the engine doesn't inject enough fuel. When it detects that it isn't injecting enough fuel it'll inject more fuel. The end result is that the engine thinks its running at a lower pressure than it actually is, and it injects more fuel to compensate as it thinks it is down on power, and the amount of fuel its injecting matches or even exceeds the pressure its actually running at.

The bottom line is that you may see a torque increase, but you wont see an MPG increase - in some cases if you google around the MPG is actually worse. Plus, if the ECU thinks everything is normal and unmodified, you risk damaging the engine or possibly even confusing a vital safety shut down ("crawl mode") feature.
 

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Seen loads of topics like this on many forums, people seem to either love or hate them. No experience so I can only give my personal views.

Why on earth would anyone want to spend over £20,000 on a car that is not right for them and then consider modifying it to make it suitable. There are more good cars available now than there has ever been, just buy one that is right for you in the first place.

The simple facts appear to be:

Remapping your car will be considered by the manufacturer as a modification, this would mean that any problems down the line would not be repaired by Kia FOC.

All remaps leave tell tale faults or codes in the ECU, the manufacturer will know its been tampered with.

Remapping your car will be considered by your insurance company as a modification. Your premium will increase but if you don't tell them and have an accident you will be without cover. And just remember, insurance companies hate paying out, they will find out if the car has been modified, they are not stupid.

All Remaps make the dash mpg read out lie, that is one thing they are very good at. Plenty of owners have been delighted until they do a tank to tank test and discover the facts, there is no improvement. How Auto Express in the previous link can say On arriving home, the average economy icon on the dash read 52.3mpg ""“ a 6.5mpg improvement over the journey earlier in the day, on the same roads, with virtually identical traffic conditions shows just how gullible even magazines are (or were they simply paid by the company to igmnore the facts about mpg figures).

The Ceed GT has 200 bhp, why would anyone need more on a public road. In my opinion it actually too much, would never buy one for that reason (and the stupid fuel consumption and RFL costs).

Just use the car and enjoy it. In all honesty how much time does anyone spend at full throttle, even in our Ceed Eco the only times you need to floor it are when you overtake and most times you don't actually need to floor it with on only 90 bhp.Edited by: Another Kia
 

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does anyone actually know what the cat setup is on the GT ?
I.E does it have a precat on the downpipe & if so how many cells ? also the main cat how many cells on that ?



the O.E setup on turbo cars is sooo restrictive & they sap sooo much power, i really want to swap it out & get some good sound from itbut the problem ive found is no well known & reputable company I.E miltek, scorpion magnex etcoffer a full system or even individual components



also want a decent panel filter to replace the restrictive O.E



if anyone has had any luck with tuning parts, id like to know



cheers all
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Donyuldz said:
does anyone actually know what the cat setup is on the GT ?
I.E does it have a precat on the downpipe & if so how many cells ? also the main cat how many cells on that ?



the O.E setup on turbo cars is sooo restrictive & they sap sooo much power, i really want to swap it out & get some good sound from itbut the problem ive found is no well known & reputable company I.E miltek, scorpion magnex etcoffer a full system or even individual components



also want a decent panel filter to replace the restrictive O.E



if anyone has had any luck with tuning parts, id like to know



cheers all

Have you thought about contacting Milltek and seeing if they are going to develop anything for the GT? I might drop them an email.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
benanderson89 said:
Me and two of my neighbours were talking about squeezing more power out of my Pro_Cee'd GT (one of them wants to buy one in red, actually) and we all came to the conclusion that before you touch the ECU, <i style="line-height: 1.4;">you should really be looking at other areas of the car first. [/i]Just mapping an ECU alone really isn't good enough in a modern turbo. Normally aspirated, yes, not a Turbo. You should really be getting more air into the engine and upping the compression ratio from its stock 9.5.

Swapping the air intake filter, the muffler or even the pre-cats to higher quality parts will allow better air flow. Do the muffler if you want your GT to sound like an absolute hooligan


Quite a lot of it will be to do with the exhaust system and although I have no doubt the one in the GT is a good system, it could probably be better since its technically a budget car. The car is too new for anyone to really know how much back-pressure is created by the stock exhaust, but on some cars you see as much as 40bhp recovered by doing nothing but fitting a performance exhaust. Even if it doesn't go as high as 40 (I doubt it will) you're relieving unnecessary stress from the engine which can only be a very good thing.

There's a previous generation Kia Pro_Cee'd with the old 2.0L petrol engine on YouTube with an aftermarket turbo pushing 0.6bar. That hits ~230bhp, a whopping 90bhp more than stock (138bhp)! Hyundai engines are quite well known for being good blocks but tuned down to abysmal levels for emissions reasons. The T-GDI should be no different.

We three think that with all that extra equipment in place + a remap you'd be looking at a healthy (IE: not stupid) 240~260bhp. That's Ford Focus ST territory. Using the rather unscientific method of "my friend with a stop watch" I've gotten my stock GT to 60 in 7s dead. Once the engine has a few thousand on it and you've allowed it to warm up for a bit (as in, the entire system has warmed through, not just the oil temp on the central dial, and the intercooler is good and cold) it allows the boost pressure to go as high 1.2bar (120kPa). I'd love to get this thing on a rolling road to see what its actually pushing out when the higher boost pressure kicks in. The Torque gauge also hits 300Nm as well. Those extra 5Nm go a long way.

If you don't want to start buying new suspension and/or break disks I'd say 230bhp would be the safe limit. It wont get the Megane 265 worried, but it'll be breathing down the neck of the Clio 200, 208 GTI and Ford Focus ST whilst leaving the VW triplets (Fabia VRS, Ibiza Cupra, Polo GTI), Fiesta ST and Golf GTD in its rear-view mirror.

You are totally right dude. It's not just about a remap. When I had our first fabia vRS (diesel) I fitted the air intake from the Ibiza Cupra, a panel filter and the car got great results on the rolling road putting out 195bhp. When I had it remapped they asked me what I wanted from the map and I told them it wasn't about top end speed because as we all know top end speeds are both reckless and mainly unobtainable on UK roads but what I wanted was the best I could get in pick up speeds and torque. The top BHP was 195 but they then backed it off to give better results in mid range.

With the GT being a turbo car its going to attract people who like to tune their cars and if you go and look around the seat, skoda and VW forums you will find endless threads about owners who are tuning their cars.
 
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