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Putting a pair of winter tyres on the front with a regular pair on the rear is literally configuring the vehicle for uncontrollable oversteer, even with FWD. Tyre manufacturers and suppliers widely recommend that the newest/grippiest pair of tyres should always be fitted to the rear to avoid this situation. During a lengthy disagreement a while ago I dug out a lot of links on this subject (from post 19 onwards)... Riken Tyres?
 

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In snow conditions if I'd only 2 winter tyres on a FWD car i'd have them on the front to provide traction, steering and majority of the braking.
 

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In snow conditions if I'd only 2 winter tyres on a FWD car i'd have them on the front to provide traction, steering and majority of the braking.
Unfortunately far too many people would also think that this was a sensible idea. Fine while moving in straight lines, but when cornering you have - in effect - created a virtual anchor point with the grippy front wheels around which the vehicle can rotate due to the dynamic forces of cornering; the resulting oversteer on an icy road would be uncontrollable! Far better to have the fronts struggling for traction as an early warning of the conditions, especially as if this did escalate to an understeer condition then this would be far easier to control than oversteer.

I would strongly urge anyone planning to fit the grippiest tyre pair to the front to consult the advice given by tyre manufacturers and suppliers. Plenty of links in the thread I added above.
 

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Not going down this route again Z. On FWD Providing the front has traction and is pulling the vehicle along the back will follow. Only excessive speed, harsh braking or steering on their own or a combination will cause the vehicle to skid.
 

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My best tyres allways go on the front (FWD) no matter what, simply to wear them down so that they will match the rears.
That way all 4 remain within a mm or so of each other, meaning the tyres are as similar as possible.
That must be about as safe as one can be during the life span of the set of tyres.

If I kept the worn ones on the front allways, the rears would degrade from old age despite having more tread depth.
 

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Not going down this route again Z. On FWD Providing the front has traction and is pulling the vehicle along the back will follow. Only excessive speed, harsh braking or steering on their own or a combination will cause the vehicle to skid.
The flaw in your explanation is that the car will not be continuously accelerating; the oversteer will obviously be more likely to occur during periods of deceleration when the front isn't pulling the vehicle along. However I don't expect to change your mind and will not further waste my time trying!

Hopefully others less sure on the subject will draw their own conclusions after considering the real expert recommendations on the tyre manufacturer and supplier websites.
 

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My best tyres allways go on the front (FWD) no matter what, simply to wear them down so that they will match the rears.
That way all 4 remain within a mm or so of each other, meaning the tyres are as similar as possible.
That must be about as safe as one can be during the life span of the set of tyres.

If I kept the worn ones on the front allways, the rears would degrade from old age despite having more tread depth.
The recommendation I follow when the fronts wear down is to have them replaced and then fitted to the rear, the rear pair is then moved to the front. This is exactly what the supplier Costco will insist upon doing.
 

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The recommendation I follow when the fronts wear down is to have them replaced and then fitted to the rear, the rear pair is then moved to the front. This is exactly what the supplier Costco will insist upon doing.
Totally agree - in wet weather, you're far more likely to struggle to cope with the back-end breaking away and causing oversteer, than the front end understeering which is far more easily controlled on the throttle.
Again this has been done to death, but I firmly believe you should always fit new tyres to the rear and rotate the rear tyres to the front.
 

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For me aquaplaning with the front tyres at speed is probably the biggest risk, nice to have that extra mm or so at the front.

The rears just follow after in tracks that have been pumped empty by the front tyres.
 

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The biggest risk is a quick evasive maneuver with the car, then you need a good traction on the back wheels, not on the front wheels!
Also by aquaplaning:then you normally do nothing, only let the car roll or glide (and hope), but due to a little bit higher resistance with the better profiled wheels back, the car will be braked a little bit at the end. This also will help to keep the car straight forwards on the street and not to turn ...
 

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The aquaplaning I experience is rarely the same on both left and right sides of the car. One side of the traffic lane has deeper water than the other so the result is that the steering will pull to one side.

This happens a lot more often than the need to perform evasive manouvers.
 
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