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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Michelin CrossClimate+
245/45 R19 Y (102)
now available for the Sportage.
These tyres work well below 7 degree, whereas normal summer tyres start to be less effective below this temperature.
I will be putting these on my Sportage next time they are due.
I had them on my Venga and they transformed the car.
Much quieter and a more subtle ride.
 

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I had them on my last car and they're a good bit of kit. Kept me moving in all weathers and lasted reasonably well too. The only problem with the 19" rims is the price, over £200 per tyre, and I've yet to find an alternative brand in 19", but I will probably save up all my pennies and buy a set, but not before the fitted tyres need changing, not at that price.

EDIT

Just re-read the original post and I agree, they were quieter and a more comfortable ride too.

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I’m pretty sure the Goodyear equivalent, the Vector 4 Seasons, is also available in the 19” size. Very well regarded tyre, too.

Have a look on mytyres.co.uk and stick the sizes in, there’s quite a few all-seasons now in our 19” sizes, although many of them are Chinese ditch-finders. But Michelin, Goodyear, and Vredestein all do them so there is some choice out there.
 

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I’m pretty sure the Goodyear equivalent, the Vector 4 Seasons, is also available in the 19” size. Very well regarded tyre, too.

Have a look on mytyres.co.uk and stick the sizes in, there’s quite a few all-seasons now in our 19” sizes, although many of them are Chinese ditch-finders. But Michelin, Goodyear, and Vredestein all do them so there is some choice out there.
Yes, the Goodyears are particularly well priced, thank you


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CrossClimate2 should be in the UK soon and are supposedly a step on the from the CrossClimate+ (which I have).

This video is quite informative.
 

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Recently, I had a pair of Michelin Cross-Climates 18" fitted on the back my Optima SW (Costco policy!). When I subsequently put the car in for its annual service, I asked the mechanic to swap the rears with the front, formerly the rears, still with plenty of tread. There was still 3 - 3.5mm tread on the old fronts at 24,000 miles but with winter approaching, I wanted the best possible traction, besides winter-specific tyres, in the cold and wet months. Besides, I felt that the original Michelins had served me very well over 4 years.

So far, I'm very pleased by the CCs as they are no noisier, possibly even less so than the originals and I haven't found any downside to steering or braking. Should I decide to keep the Optima a bit longer, I shall probably switch the remaining two original tyres to match the Cross-Climates perhaps before next winter.

Since the price differential isn't massive between regular tyres and X-climates, I shall probably equip any future vehicles with all-season rubber.
 

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Recently, I had a pair of Michelin Cross-Climates 18" fitted on the back my Optima SW (Costco policy!). When I subsequently put the car in for its annual service, I asked the mechanic to swap the rears with the front, formerly the rears, still with plenty of tread. There was still 3 - 3.5mm tread on the old fronts at 24,000 miles but with winter approaching, I wanted the best possible traction, besides winter-specific tyres, in the cold and wet months. Besides, I felt that the original Michelins had served me very well over 4 years.

So far, I'm very pleased by the CCs as they are no noisier, possibly even less so than the originals and I haven't found any downside to steering or braking. Should I decide to keep the Optima a bit longer, I shall probably switch the remaining two original tyres to match the Cross-Climates perhaps before next winter.

Since the price differential isn't massive between regular tyres and X-climates, I shall probably equip any future vehicles with all-season rubber.
Reading this post, I am not sure, but do you have summer tyres on one axle and all season tyres on the other.
If this is the case, this is dangerous as the levels of grip from each end of the car varies significantly. Having the Cross-Climates on the front is even worse as the rear will lose traction on slippery roads a lot earlier than the front, meaning a trip into the nearest ditch is far more likely.
 

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I don't think so... that's not what he says at 21m18s
I had CrossClimate+ on my last car, they have been around for a few years. The dealer told me that the + designation related to the rim size (over a certain size was designated +). I believe that CrossClimate2 is indeed the next generation.


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I think the dealer is confusing the + version with the SUV version, the way I read this article.

My front CrossClimate+s are having their last winter for me as they're down to about 3 to 4mm of tread. I'll hang on replacing them in the hope CrossClimate2s will be here next summer. I will likely have got about 30k out of them. The rears might be date expired before they wear-out!
 

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All I know is what the dealer told me, and I assume he knows more about tyres than I do. The sidewalls were marked CrossClimate+ and that was 2-3 years ago, so they won't be the next generation ones


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Having the Cross-Climates on the front is even worse as the rear will lose traction on slippery roads a lot earlier than the front, meaning a trip into the nearest ditch is far more likely.
Presumably you prefer to deal with the front end of a vehicle losing traction because you have completed a skid-prevention and recovery course? I don't and it is perfectly safe and legal to have a pair of X-climate tyres on the driven front wheels of a car and 5-6 mm of tread on the same brand of non X-climate tyres on the non-driven rear wheels.
 

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I always wait until the tread is down to the TWI when I’m paying🦕
 

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They're a good compromise if you don't have facility to store a 2nd set of wheels, but CC tyres are not as good as full winter tyres in the cold, nor are they as surefooted as summer tyres the rest of the year.
 

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Presumably you prefer to deal with the front end of a vehicle losing traction because you have completed a skid-prevention and recovery course? I don't and it is perfectly safe and legal to have a pair of X-climate tyres on the driven front wheels of a car and 5-6 mm of tread on the same brand of non X-climate tyres on the non-driven rear wheels.
It is perfectly legal to drive a car with tyres with 1.6mm of tread. It is not a particularly good idea as it takes 2 car lengths extra to stop over a tyre with 3mm.

Please read what the experts say.


 

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This ones been done to death and further.
Firstly Id argue with what you say about tread depth. If you had slick tyres would that extend your braking distance even further. Tread is about providing traction on loose and muddy surfaces and dissipating water on a wet surface.
Tyre constuction is a safety compromise. The deaper the tread the more movement in the rubber and the less stable the tyre.
As for the new tyres on the front or rear dilema the industry will always err towards the side of caution from a litigation point of view. Many tests have been undertaken and it is to do with understeer and oversteer. At the limit, on a wet surface and on a bend it is possible to loose the back end. But we are talking about critical speeds here. Poor traction on the front will result in understeer which basically means again that at critical speeds the front will go straight on. Throw some braking in there and things can get out of shape but the rear of the car will lift providing even less traction.
Average Joe Public are more likely to induce an oversteer situation so manufacturers will make their recommendations that the best tyres go to the rear.
Coming from an emergency response and competition background front wheel drive got new tyres on the front because of the style of driving.
To be fair to come unstuck with less tread on the rear things would really be getting out of shape for you
 

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This ones been done to death and further.
Firstly Id argue with what you say about tread depth. If you had slick tyres would that extend your braking distance even further. Tread is about providing traction on loose and muddy surfaces and dissipating water on a wet surface.
Tyre constuction is a safety compromise. The deaper the tread the more movement in the rubber and the less stable the tyre.
As for the new tyres on the front or rear dilema the industry will always err towards the side of caution from a litigation point of view. Many tests have been undertaken and it is to do with understeer and oversteer. At the limit, on a wet surface and on a bend it is possible to loose the back end. But we are talking about critical speeds here. Poor traction on the front will result in understeer which basically means again that at critical speeds the front will go straight on. Throw some braking in there and things can get out of shape but the rear of the car will lift providing even less traction.
Average Joe Public are more likely to induce an oversteer situation so manufacturers will make their recommendations that the best tyres go to the rear.
Coming from an emergency response and competition background front wheel drive got new tyres on the front because of the style of driving.
To be fair to come unstuck with less tread on the rear things would really be getting out of shape for you
At last! someone speaking some sense!
 

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This ones been done to death and further.
Firstly Id argue with what you say about tread depth. If you had slick tyres would that extend your braking distance even further. Tread is about providing traction on loose and muddy surfaces and dissipating water on a wet surface.
Tyre constuction is a safety compromise. The deaper the tread the more movement in the rubber and the less stable the tyre.
As for the new tyres on the front or rear dilema the industry will always err towards the side of caution from a litigation point of view. Many tests have been undertaken and it is to do with understeer and oversteer. At the limit, on a wet surface and on a bend it is possible to loose the back end. But we are talking about critical speeds here. Poor traction on the front will result in understeer which basically means again that at critical speeds the front will go straight on. Throw some braking in there and things can get out of shape but the rear of the car will lift providing even less traction.
Average Joe Public are more likely to induce an oversteer situation so manufacturers will make their recommendations that the best tyres go to the rear.
Coming from an emergency response and competition background front wheel drive got new tyres on the front because of the style of driving.
To be fair to come unstuck with less tread on the rear things would really be getting out of shape for you
At last! someone speaking some sense!
A forum expert or actual experts, I know who I would trust.

An extreme example, but still shows what a difference in grip can cause

 

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While I would not even consider mixing Summer/Winter tyres the video is only mildly interesting - it is not at all scientific and no conclusions can be drawn.. It would be interesting to have three other controlled experiments with the same vehicl on the same trak:

1) Summer tyres all round.

2) Winters on rear and summers on front

3) Winters all round.

That way some proper conclusions can drawn from comparisons. As it stands all we know is stuff happens with Winters on front only - is this better/ worse easier/harder to control?
To quote the late Partick Moore "We simply don't know"

Waste of time performing the one test only..
 
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