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2006 4wd 2litre diesel xs. Can anybody thoroughly explain the ins and outs of the 4 wheel drive system( ie 4wheel lock and esp), does the 4 wheel drive system work automatically if slip is detected or does the esp come in on the front wheels only? Handbook pretty vague, also there is talk about 4 wheel drive being selected automatically , does this mean that when 4wd is selected that the 4wd is turned off above 20mph and then when speed drops below 20mph it switches back on, is this what is being refered to as automatic 4wd
 

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The handbook isn't very clear. My understanding is that the 4WD system is in automatic unless you have pressed the lock button. Even if you have pressed the lock button, the system goes to automatic above 20 MPH and then reverts to locked as you slow done. The system will still kick-in above 20MPH if wheel slippage occurs on the front axle. These bits are from a 2007 US promotion (NB not all models have TCS or ESC):


On demand electronic 4WD:

When sensors detect traction loss, a central controller engages a clutch pack in the coupling assembly to connect the rear wheels to the powertrain
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Engine torque is transferred to the rear wheels to improve traction and keep Sportage moving
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The 4WD LOCK feature allows the driver to ""lock""� the coupling assembly into 4WD by depressing a switch on the instrument panel


Traction Control System:


As sensors detect traction loss, the central controller applies brake pressure to the slipping wheel and diverts additional power to the wheel with traction
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With the combination of Electronic Control On-demand 4WD and Traction Control,Sportage may need only one wheel to have sufficient traction to keep the vehicle moving
Electronic Stability control:




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ESC sensors monitor steering wheel angle, actual vehicle path, yaw and vehicle speed
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The ESC controller instantly detects potential loss of control during understeer or oversteer situations
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By adjusting throttle and applying select brakes, ESC helps the driver maintain control of the vehicle and keep it on its intended path
ESC also features the convenience of a driver ESC OFF switch to disengage the system when the vehicle is in conditions such as deep snow or mud.



Richard
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply Richard, it looks like their are a lot of Sportage owners (including myself) that don't really know what happens with the 4wheel drive system on this model
 

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I read in a US magazine (Road & Track)that Borg Warner made the 4WD system for the Sportage (2005 -10). I've pasted in this article from Canadian Driver dated 2 August 2006 (author Jim Kerr) which refers to the Huyandi Santa Fe (2007 model)....I expect that the technical detail will read across to the Sportage. Elsewhere I've seen reference to the system being the
Borg Warner ITM3-e which was also fitted to the Porsche 911!






Hyundai's new system uses a computer-controlled clutch mechanism mounted in front of the rear axle to engage the drive. It is a Borg Warner system that can provide up to 99% of the torque to the front wheels, but automatically diverts up to 50% of the torque to the rear wheels when needed. The driver can push a button on the dash as an input to the computer, commanding it to ""lock""� the torque transfer at 50/50 for getting out of slippery parking spots in winter or ploughing through some soft sand. While there is no low range in the Santa Fe all-wheel drive system, it is more than capable of handling many off-road excursions.


Because the torque transfer to the rear wheels is variable, a dependable, durable clutch mechanism is needed that can be instantly engaged. To do this, the computer monitors wheel speed, accelerator pedal movement and steering inputs. When 4% or more front wheel slip is detected, the rear axle starts to engage. It can also anticipate the need for additional traction and engage the AWD system when the driver accelerates the vehicle. Another feature is it can disengage the rear axle during ABS events to optimize ABS stopping.


The computer controls a large solenoid coil in the clutch housing. When energized, the solenoid pushes against a multi-plate clutch, which in turn holds a washer-like plate from turning. Ramps and balls between this plate and a second plate cause the two plates to be forced apart, placing pressure on a second larger multi-plate clutch that connects the driveshaft to the rear axle. The path of torque is complete and the rear wheels drive.


A button on the dash can lock the clutch to provide 50% torque to the rear wheels, but this only occurs below 35 kph. Above that speed, the computer pulses the solenoid to disengage the clutch mechanism, but it will automatically engage it again when vehicle speed lowers.


Finally, the system monitors steering wheel angle. Turn the steering wheel, such as when parallel parking or turning a tight corner and the computer will decrease the torque applied to the rear wheels so there is no driveline binding during the turn.


Computer controls, electric solenoids and data communication between computers are all used to provide smooth traction regardless of the driving conditions and optimize fuel economy too. That's modern all-wheel drive.
Edited by: Blow-in
 

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Reading a few more sources it looks like it was the Borg Warner ITM2e that was fitted to the Sportage from 2005 onwards (works as described above for the ITM3e). From MY2009 the unit was the Borg Warner NexTrac which has 'greener' credentials. As far as I can tell though the basic operation of all these systems is very similar. Anyway, the next time the person standing next to you in the pub rubbishes your KIA Sportage 4WD, just remind him it's the same system used on the Porsche 911TT.


Richard
 

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So is the 4x4 system on the old Sportage the same (ish) as the Dynamax system on the 2011 Sportage?.


Sounds the same from the info. Is the Dynamax one better for any reason?



Slim
 

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Yep, read that some time ago. Sounds just like the old system to me with different words. Are their any fundamental changes to the new Dynmax system over the old one?


Slim
 

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audioslim said:
Yep, read that some time ago. Sounds just like the old system to me with different words. Are their any fundamental changes to the new Dynmax system over the old one?


Slim


That's a good question. Mechanically the 2G Borg Warner system looks like the3G Magna Powertrain system. Magna acquired its 4WD know-how from Steyr Puch so some of this may simply be the hyperbole associated with a new business alliance. Magna claim that their system anticipates whereas the others react...in this case, I thinkthe differencesmust all be down to the electronics.


Richard
 
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