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22 sportage gt line flame blue
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all i may be missing something but, I have ordered a new 5gen sportage 1.6T GDI 48v ISG GTLine DCT.
Petrol only. What does the 48v stand for?
 

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On Order: Sportage GT Line S PHEV in Infra Red
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Car engines have used a 12V electrical system since... forever. In order to take advantage of the newer, more econmical options available to assist the engine - like combined starter/generators etc. these require more power than could be delievered by the older 12V electrics. Hence, they have moved to a higher 48V electrical system to provide that extra power to all those electric ancilliaries.

There is of course a 12V system still available inside the car etc. so nothing changes from what you can plug into the cigarette ligther socket etc.
 

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Yes. HEV has larger battery and can run on electric only at certain speeds for short time. PHEV is full p l ug in electric and can run on electric only for linger periods of time and to higher speeds
 

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22 sportage gt line flame blue
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes. HEV has larger battery and can run on electric only at certain speeds for short time. PHEV is full p l ug in electric and can run on electric only for linger periods of time and to higher speeds
Thank you guys, that seems to have cleared that up! I knew someone on here would know. Just got to get it now 👍🏻
 

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Ah thanks for that, that is different to the HEV then?
Not wanting to add confusion but the HEV uses a 270V battery and electric motor.
The Mild Hybrid uses a 48V system, and the PHEV uses a 360V battery and electric motor.

Lots of different voltages now!! lol
 

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On order (17th Feb): 2022 Sportage GT-Line S HEV in Penta Grey with black roof.
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But they never actually say why the voltages are different.
Because the batteries are made up of individual cells, the bigger the battery, the more cells, therefore a higher voltage. It’s actually the power capacity of the batteries in kWh (kilowatt hours) that determines the amount of time, and therefore distance, that the car can run on the battery. The batteries of all mild hybrid and full hybrid cars are charged by utilising regenerative braking, and don’t need plugging in to charge.

The 48v systems in mild hybrids cannot store enough energy to propel the car by electricity alone, but simply supplement the power delivered by the IC engine. The full hybrids have a larger battery (hence greater voltage and power capacity) that can propel the car for short distances and the switch from EV to IC cannot be controlled by the driver but is done automatically by the car.

The plug-in hybrids (PHEV) need to have their even larger batteries charged from an external source as the car is not able to do this itself. It is still possible to drive PHEV cars with a flat drive battery, but because of the smaller engine and heavy weight of the batteries, the fuel consumption would be worse than driving a normal petrol/diesel car.
 
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All rather confusing! A petrol engine or a diesel, or a petrol engine with larger, but still tiny 48v battery hybrid to eke out a slightly better economy, a petrol plus larger battery (HEV) and a petrol plus 14 Kwh battery as a Plug In.
The Plug In has about 38 miles of EV running for local runs. In 2 weeks we've topped up twice, and still have most of the £20 of fuel from the dealer! :) That's mainly as I'm still trying to get full use back after breaking my shoulder, so hospital appointments and going to nearby woods for dog walking thanks to my chauffeur

I was not a fan of hybrids, as you are lugging around 2 forms of propulsion and quite frankly the 48v and HEV don't seem to add much for the trouble and expense of the extra battery.
At least the Plug In allows "pure" EV running for shortish distances plus with solar panels charging during the day is free.
I did one overnight charge but with 5 Kwh storage, it still needed another 9 Kwh to top up, and even at night rates that cost me £3!!
So now, once the 5Kwh solar battery is topped, plus say 6 Kwh from the panels, charging to 100% is less than 2 hours "free" (apart from the cost of panels, battery and charge point, ahem).
To go full electric would mean going to 3 phase with all the extra palaver, plus looking for High Power charge points, of which there are not too many locally, and still require a chunk of time to charge. Not knocking pure EV, just that I'm not ready to trust full EV yet.
 
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Home charging does not require 3 phase. Single phase is more than enough.

Remember at home the AC wall box does not charge the car, it just like a switch supplying power to the AC charger is built into the car. So AC charging speed is limited to the car. Which on Kia's tends to be 7kW, the 4+ Niro 11kW. EV6 is 22kW. So might just warrant 3 phase, but would only save you 4 hours charging.

The 3-phase charging has a higher power transfer capacity than the single phase charging – the former powers at 22kW, whereas the latter does so at 7.4kW.
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As far as you Sportage goes.
The car’s 13.8kWh battery can be charged in less than two hours, using a 7.2kW charger.
So looks like Sportage PHEV has twice the charging speed of other Kia PHEV's which are limited to 3.6kW
You will not get more than 7.2kW on a fast 150kW chargers.
 

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Home charging does not require 3 phase. Single phase is more than enough.

Remember at home the AC wall box does not charge the car, it just like a switch supplying power to the AC charger is built into the car. So AC charging speed is limited to the car. Which on Kia's tends to be 7kW, the 4+ Niro 11kW. EV6 is 22kW. So might just warrant 3 phase, but would only save you 4 hours charging.



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As far as you Sportage goes.


So looks like Sportage PHEV has twice the charging speed of other Kia PHEV's which are limited to 3.6kW
You will not get more than 7.2kW on a fast 150kW chargers.
The Sportage is the first Kia PHEV to charge at 7.2KW.

The wall box does charge the car but the AC is converted to DC by a rectifier in the car.

As far as I know you can’t connect it to those high power chargers anyway as they’re all DC and use a tethered cable with a couple of extra pins that wouldn’t allow it to be plugged in
 

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That was the point I was making about PHEV versus full EV.
My Sporty does charge at 32 amps at 7.2Kw, in just under 2 hours to 100% and 38 miles EV range showing.
Ionity chargers indicate that even a "fast charger" downgrades charge to just 3 Kw for the Sporty PHEV, clogging up a fast charger for hours, which pretty unrealistic. Just go for a 7.2Kw charger.

As said, the EV6 will charge at 22 Kw so a fast charger works better for that.
 
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