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Discussion Starter #1
Don't know if anyone can help. My Venga is about three and half years old and a couple of times recently I have gone to start it and there has been no power to start it, just get a lot of clicking and flickering lights on the dashboard. At first I thought one of the courtesy lights might have jammed on so I made sure they wouldn't operate when the doors open. I recharged and went for a decent run in it and the next day (last Friday) it started perfectly OK. Tried to start it today, no power. Obviously in these times I don't want to be taking the car anywhere as I am in the self isolating age group. Can anyone offer any advice? I noticed that it is quite a puny size battery only 45 amp hour. I appreciate I may need a new battery but given the age of the car it seems odd that it need s changing so soon!

David
 

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That definitely sounds like a flat battery, but one day and not the next suggests a bad connection on the battery or battery to chassis earth.
Or slipping belt
Or loose connection on/from alternator (ie not always charging)
Or bad earth from engine to chassis.
Or a crushed cable to/from any of the above.

So something to do in your self isolation.
 

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Think thats the wrong battery for a 2016 model which should be stop start..my son has that battery on his ix20 non stop start..think I would be changing yours if I were you..I'm now using a solar powered charger on my car which doesn't have a stop start battery and thats keeping my volts up in the 11.7 to 12.2 range on the plug in meter ..mine is not being used for days on end at the moment and I am glad I bit the bullet and bought it around a week ago..AA its made by and the only one I could find that connects to the obd port under the dash ..
 

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thats keeping my volts up in the 11.7 to 12.2 range on the plug in meter
A healthy 12 volt car battery should be approx 12.6 or 12.7 volts when fully charged and been standing overnight. Much less than 12.4 volts and I doubt the car would start.

I suspect you have a rubbish plug in meter if yours is still starting OK.
 

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A healthy 12 volt car battery should be approx 12.6 or 12.7 volts when fully charged and been standing overnight. Much less than 12.4 volts and I doubt the car would start.

I suspect you have a rubbish plug in meter if yours is still starting OK.
Car is starting fine and never failed to..have had readings as low as 10v on the meter in one instance and it still started..have noticed that before I bought the solar charger I would have to take the car for a 15 mile run to get a charging reading of 14.2 but now using the solar charger it gets to 14.2 in a matter of minutes and in a few miles ..have sat in the car before I bought the solar charger with the engine running and meter showing 11 volts at switch on and it would take 30 mins to get a reading of 14.1 to 14.2..when I did that and after turning the engine off and then back on the meter would read 12.7..wife has a meter in her car as well so I will swop them over when I get a chance to see if there is any difference in the readings..struggling a bit at the mo with my health and have another bowel infection..wife just managed to get through to our doc after trying all day to get some antibiotics..hopefully they will work but that might be a few days before the meds get to me..chaos at the Moment and all over the world due to CV19 and the NHS is being hit very hard..both our surgery and chemist is utter chaos..will report back if and when I can on this thread so see you all then..

Stay safe..

6444
 

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A healthy 12 volt car battery should be approx 12.6 or 12.7 volts when fully charged and been standing overnight. Much less than 12.4 volts and I doubt the car would start.

I suspect you have a rubbish plug in meter if yours is still starting OK.

I beg to differ. A rest voltage of 12,4 is a charge state of appx 75%
 

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Remember the Kia system normally only replaces what is drawn from the battery, it does not charge the battery UP except on the overrun. This is well known, Kia say it is the most ecological way.
 

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I beg to differ. A rest voltage of 12,4 is a charge state of appx 75%
The info I quoted was as experienced myself about 10 years ago. Went out to start car and nothing other than a click. Tried again and the dash lit up like a Baboons arse and you could hear relays clicking behind the dash, switched off immediately. I checked the battery voltage with my multimeter and it read 12.4 volts and I thought that showed it was fine and needed to look elsewhere. After all, it was more than 12 volts as printed on the label.

But just to be on the safe side I put it on charge for the day and rather staggeringly the meter never got down to zero as it had before. After standing overnight I checked the voltage which was 12.5 (from memory) so refitted the battery and all I got was the same as the previous day.

Admitted defeat and took battery to local battery specialists who told me that if it only showed 12.5 volts after a days charge either the battery or charger were goosed. He explained that a 12 volt battery is actually quite a bit over that figure when fully charged and that with only 12.5 volts it would unlikely start the car. So I took his advice and bought a new one, an Exide that actually had a higher starting capacity than the old one, cost about £45.

When I got it home I checked the voltage, 12.9 so I fitted it and eureka, it started first touch. Took the car for a drive round and then it stood overnight, next morning the voltage was still 12.9. Over the next 7 years I checked the voltage occasionally and over time it got lower until one day all I got was the click again. Did not bother with the charger, just bought a new battery a Yuasa this time and it started first touch.
 

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The info I quoted was as experienced myself about 10 years ago. Went out to start car and nothing other than a click. Tried again and the dash lit up like a Baboons arse and you could hear relays clicking behind the dash, switched off immediately. I checked the battery voltage with my multimeter and it read 12.4 volts and I thought that showed it was fine and needed to look elsewhere. After all, it was more than 12 volts as printed on the label.

But just to be on the safe side I put it on charge for the day and rather staggeringly the meter never got down to zero as it had before. After standing overnight I checked the voltage which was 12.5 (from memory) so refitted the battery and all I got was the same as the previous day.

Admitted defeat and took battery to local battery specialists who told me that if it only showed 12.5 volts after a days charge either the battery or charger were goosed. He explained that a 12 volt battery is actually quite a bit over that figure when fully charged and that with only 12.5 volts it would unlikely start the car. So I took his advice and bought a new one, an Exide that actually had a higher starting capacity than the old one, cost about £45.

When I got it home I checked the voltage, 12.9 so I fitted it and eureka, it started first touch. Took the car for a drive round and then it stood overnight, next morning the voltage was still 12.9. Over the next 7 years I checked the voltage occasionally and over time it got lower until one day all I got was the click again. Did not bother with the charger, just bought a new battery a Yuasa this time and it started first touch.
Now this I do find a strange one.. because as stated in an earlier post my battery has been down as low as 10v on the meter in the car and did start..did a test the other day and checked volts on the meter and then directly with a multimeter on the battery..voltage difference was 00.2 so not a lot..difference between the meter in my wife car to mine was 00.1 so very little indeed..
 

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Phil, The reading you are getting seems very low since a fully discharged battery which has been at rest for at least three hours will have a terminal voltage of about 10.5 V - I think AGM batteries drop lower than that. Not disagreeing with you here but that reading does seem anomalous. I guess your plug in meter only reads when ign/acc on so this puts the battery under some load and perhaps that is the difference. Also things like aircon and blower and (if a diesel) glow plugs are greater loads.

I think the mistake that many folks make is to assume that the resting terminal voltage tells you all you ned to know about a battery. A healthy battery which is only 10% charged (about 11.5 V) can and will start a car. A knackered battery might show 12.5 at rest but this will collapse to a very low voltage when attempting to crank. This is why battery specialists look at the rest voltage and then again when the battery is under load and again when the engine is running and it should be charging. It is the relationship between these three readings which will allow an approximation of the charge state and the health of the battery.
 

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Went out a short time ago to turn over our cars..wife drives a swift..hers was down to 11.5v mine was reading 11.8v when ign was switched on..hers quickly rose to 14.4 in around 30 seconds and went upto 14.6 in one instance before I switched off and engine warmed up..venga surprised me as stated 11.8v when switched on and quickly rose to 13.6v and then to 14.2v..as you know I have been using that solar charger and it seems to be doing the trick for me..even when the lead acid battery on there was new last Sept its never recovered this quick when taking it for an extended run 15/20 miles..was cold outside as well with bitter wind chill..just wish my garage was empty so I could park betsie in there.. 😕 when turning off ign on her and then back on it read 12.7v..
 

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I would forget the plug in meter and use a multimeter across the terminals. I have a suspicion that with the engine not running some electrical magic used on modern cars is restricting the voltage to below 12 volts, possibly to save power when running accessories. Your running voltage of 14.4 is spot on what I would expect (although smart alternators can charge at higher voltages than this) thus your meter appears accurate. I have a plug in meter but not used it for years. Back in those days it did read the correct voltage with the engine off, by that I mean the same as the multimeter across the battery.

With regards to your comment "when turning off ign on her and then back on it read 12.7v.", when you turn the ignition off the battery voltage should still be up at around 13.5 volts and will take quite a while to reduce to a stable figure. That is why its important to check it after standing overnight before starting the car.
 

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Don't know if anyone can help. My Venga is about three and half years old and a couple of times recently I have gone to start it and there has been no power to start it, just get a lot of clicking and flickering lights on the dashboard. At first I thought one of the courtesy lights might have jammed on so I made sure they wouldn't operate when the doors open. I recharged and went for a decent run in it and the next day (last Friday) it started perfectly OK. Tried to start it today, no power. Obviously in these times I don't want to be taking the car anywhere as I am in the self isolating age group. Can anyone offer any advice? I noticed that it is quite a puny size battery only 45 amp hour. I appreciate I may need a new battery but given the age of the car it seems odd that it need s changing so soon!

David
Remember the Kia system normally only replaces what is drawn from the battery, it does not charge the battery UP except on the overrun. This is well known, Kia say it is the most ecological way.
 

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MY 16 PLATE VENGA battery kept going flat .dealer and AA said it was the battery faulty. I changed the battery for a larger battery .it is a bit of faf to remove the battery the fixing bolts are at the rear of the battery tray you need a mirror
to see them .the factory battery has only a one year guarantee.
 

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Remember the Kia system normally only replaces what is drawn from the battery, it does not charge the battery UP except on the overrun. This is well known, Kia say it is the most ecological way.
This is not quite correct. The KIA smart charge system will charge a battery conventioally until the battery reaches 70-80% charge and then only using over run energy beyond that.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for all the replies. Today I have given it a full charge.It's not so easy to take the car out for a decent run these day as I am supposed to be in self isolation! I now have a new multimeter so I can monitor the voltage in the battery before starting. If I continue to have problems I will bite the bullet and buy a new battery.

David
 
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