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Hi all, hope everyone's well.

I've just been offered a 2014 Sportage and really liked the car, however, its a diesel and I've never had one before. We mostly use the car for local trips with the occasional (maybe once or twice a month) longer motorway trip, although with everything going on god knows when we'll venture further out!

Having heard some horror stories about DPF issues on diesels generally, just thought it would be nice to ask some of you about your experiences with this particular model.

Thanks!
 

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I don't know this car specifically, but short trips are better performed by a petrol. My advice is to ignore any savings you may make when buying fuel, and go for a petrol, based on your frequent short trips.
 

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There's too much fuss made about DPFs in my opinion.
Horror stories of main dealers charging £1500.....well, yes, if you're daft enough to let them!!
When it eventually clogs, which it will at some point, just get it cleaned out by one of the myriad of companies near you who will do it.
Ther'e even mobile services will do it at your house.
Push come to shove and you decide to fit a new one, buy a pattern (non-Kia) replacement and get an exhaust place to fit it.
If you like the car and know the history, be daft to walk away just because of this. :D
Remember the DPF is just a tin can full of soot and nothing else. (y)
My wife has been doing urban-only driving in diesels for years without any DPF hassles in quite a few different makes of cars.
 

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There's too much fuss made about DPFs in my opinion.
Horror stories of main dealers charging £1500.....well, yes, if you're daft enough to let them!!
When it eventually clogs, which it will at some point, just get it cleaned out by one of the myriad of companies near you who will do it.
Ther'e even mobile services will do it at your house.
Push come to shove and you decide to fit a new one, buy a pattern (non-Kia) replacement and get an exhaust place to fit it.
If you like the car and know the history, be daft to walk away just because of this. :D
Remember the DPF is just a tin can full of soot and nothing else. (y)
My wife has been doing urban-only driving in diesels for years without any DPF hassles in quite a few different makes of cars.
Many companies offering DPF cleaning are simply a set of con men, some are law breakers and have been prosecuted.

It is possible to clean a DPF, its a service used on commercials and off road plant. Basically the DPF is removed off the vehicle, placed in a large oven and connected to pipework. The oven is heated and the correct mixture of air/diesel blown into the pipework which simulates a regen but under better controlled conditions. Problem is it takes hours and costs ££££'s but its worth it on large plant since the DPF's are more expensive than on passenger vehicles. For us its not economically viable, a new DPF is cheaper.

Most companies that clean DPF's simply add chemicals and jet wash the DPF. It does not wor since the soot is chemically bonded to the DPF matrix and it needs the 600 C temp of a regen to dislodge it and then burn it off.

And after all that there is the ash left after a regen, that does not burn off and in most cases is what condemns a DPF to the scrap heap, in truth to the precious metal recoverers.

DPF contents are toxic, do you want to risk your health.

The simplest solution is to buy petrol car if you are doding short trips mainly, we have for the past 7 years now. With modern petrol turbo's you get almost diesel mpg, dielsel mid range drivability but much better refinement. When you consider these cars are cheaper than diesels and more able to use in all parts of the country what is not to like?
 

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The simplest solution is to buy petrol car if you are doding short trips mainly, we have for the past 7 years now. With modern petrol turbo's you get almost diesel mpg, dielsel mid range drivability but much better refinement. When you consider these cars are cheaper than diesels and more able to use in all parts of the country what is not to like?
If the OP was buying new I'd be more inclined to agree with you.
But he's been offered a 2014 diesel he clearly likes and it's a shame to let largely unfounded DPF fears put him off.
Had a quick look online and a new DPF is £199.99, another £100 to fit it maybe?
Not worth walking away from the car for the sake of £300 he may or may not have to spend?
 
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