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Discussion Starter #1
The tyres on my Cee'd will be ready for changing soon, if only at the front. It still has the Michelin Energy tyres on supplied from new and they are good but bloody noisy.

Just wondered which, if any, other tyres/models have others used as replacements and with what degrees of success in terms of noise and/or mpg?

Cheers

Paul
 

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Paul I've got Falken ZIEX ZE912 on my Rio and they are quieter than Michelin energys that I had on my Ceeds. I think running on steel rims would be quieter than michelins
I had michelins on an old Kia Mentor and they were the same very noisy. I just put on some budget brand cant remember what they were called but they were quiet.
 

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There is a web site call tyrereviewsDOTcoDOTuk
Here youll find reviews on all sizes of tyres you can even search by car etc. Its worth a look.
Bear in mind that a particular brand/model of tyre is often very good at a particular wheel size and less so on another wheel size.

On my previous car I relaced the [expenisve] michelin energys with [cheaper] goodyear efficient grips that are supposed to be as good regarding mpg but quieter. However I sold the car after 4000 miles so I never really got a long term view on those tyres. When my Ceed tyres are due (spring most likley) I'll probably try the goodyears again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From the reviews I think I have settled on Uniroyal Rainsport 2's. I have aways had Michelins on my cars but have neen disappointed with the stock Michelin Energy tyres on my Cee'd from new.

Uniroyals may not be premium but they get great reviews and are 50 quid a tyre (unfitted) if you shoparound.

Anyone know anywhere in Merseyside/Lancs that will ft tyres bought from a 3rd party?

Paul
 

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I changed my car from an Audi A4 to a Hyundai i30 1.6 CRDi 6 speed premium (the sister car to aCeed) last September and have been very unhappy with the noisy Hankook 225/45/R17 tyres. I have read elsewhere that the Michelin Energy tyres on the Ceed are much quieter and I am surprised at what I read in this post.
I am particularly sensitive to cabin noise because I suffer from hearing loss and have to use hearing aids. I find holding a conversation in the car difficult - especially with rear seat passengers. My wife craves for the Audi back and is fed up with having to lean across the car to almost shout in my ear.



After a noisy 4000 miles of motoring I have given up on the tyres and have new ones on order. After considerable research I have decided to change to Yokohama AVS BD V550 tyres which have a sound reputation (forgive the play on words), with very low noise levels but possibly at the expense of reduced tread life compared with the Hankooks.



I have taken sound level readings with a decibel meter on various roads in my area - including the M42 with concrete, old tarmac and new low noise tarmac sections as a reference to compare with the new tyres when they are fitted next week. After spending £320 on 4 new tyres I have my fingers crossed that it achieves the desired result.
 

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Paulq said:
From the reviews I think I have settled on Uniroyal Rainsport 2's. I have aways had Michelins on my cars but have neen disappointed with the stock Michelin Energy tyres on my Cee'd from new.



Uniroyals may not be premium but they get great reviews and are 50 quid a tyre (unfitted) if you shoparound.




Anyone know anywhere in Merseyside/Lancs that will ft tyres bought from a 3rd party?




Paul







Try Mytyres DOT co DOT uk and do a search for fitting centres. They will not mind where you got your tyres from. They also list the price of fitting for each centre.
 

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AlanHo said:
I have taken sound level readings with a decibel meter on various roads in my area - including the M42 with concrete, old tarmac and new low noise tarmac sections as a reference to compare with the new tyres when they are fitted next week. After spending £320 on 4 new tyres I have my fingers crossed that it achieves the desired result.

Keep us updated with your findings.

When our Soul (originally fitted with Nexen tyres) needed new tyres, I chose Goodyear's new Vector 4Seasons tyres after reading reviews and tests (mainly from AutoBild). I was amazed that different tyres can make such a profound difference to the car. Not only is it significantly quieter, it is like it has different suspension! Bumps and potholes are soooo much less of a shock through the car and it's smoother/softer generally. They really have transformed the ride quality. And this is with them at the same air pressure as before. These Goodyear tyres are all-season tyres and they performed amazingly in the snow, getting us up our hill that others (including my Ceed) couldn't. They are also meant to be good in the summer. I'm very impressed with these tyres (more so than any other tyre purchase I've ever made) and will be putting these on my Ceed when the original Michelins wear out (which I wish would be much earlier).
 

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Here is the result of the tyre noise tests. Measurement carried out on the same level sections of road with the clutch depressed to minimise engine noise. Sunny dry days ""“ little wind.

Motorway ""“ 65 mph ""“ old and noisy tarmac
Hankook tyres 75 dB-A and 96 dB-C
Yokohama tyres 73 dB-A and 94 dB-C

Motorway ""“ 65 mph ""“ grooved concrete surface
Hankook Tyres 76 dB-A and 95 dB-C
Yokohama tyres 72 dB-A and 92 dB-C

Motorway ""“ 65 mph ""“ low noise tarmac about 12 months old
Hankook tyres 73 dB-A and 93 dB-C
Yokohama tyres 68 dB-A and 79 dB-C

A class road ""“ 40 mph ""“ grit surface dressed tarmac
Hankook tyres 74 dB-A and 96 dB-C
Yokohama tyres 73 dB-A and 94 dB-C

C weighting decibel figures are for the total sound frequency range.
A weighting covers only the frequency range of normal human hearing.

I am aware of some anomalies in the comparisons ""“ however the figures quoted are the average of 3 identical tests on each section of road. In general the Yokohama tyres are less noisy. On very rough surfaces there seems to be little difference between the tyres ""“ but on smoother surfaces there is a more marked improvement.

What was interesting is that there is a section of the M42 near where I live that has a 1 mile section of concrete road which changes abruptly to tarmac. As the car moved from concrete to tarmac ""“ or vici versa ""“ my ears told me that there was a sudden and significant change in noise level between the tyres ""“ the concrete being noticeably more noisy. However the decibel meter readings did not confirm this.

Summary

The Yokohama tyres are quieter than the Hankooks on most road surfaces ""“ I can hear the difference on all but very rough side roads and it is confirmed by the decibel meter. However the difference is not as marked as I had hoped for other than on smooth low noise tarmac where the Yokohama tyres, unlike the Hankooks, are really very quiet.
 

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But as I understand it 3dB represents a doubling of sound level so whilst you say the concrete section did not seem to make much difference to the meter readings its a 3 or 4 dB difference at least for the A weighting, so more than twice as loud.


I too know that section of road and it always wakes me up when returning home in the late evening. They are re-surfacing the tarmac sections north of the concrete that I thought were OK so it looks as though the concrete will be remaining for awhile yet.
 

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That's interesting Alan. I've just gone back to my OEM Hankook summer tyres and I've noticed that I have to have the radio on much louder to hear what's being said. It's odd, I would have thought the winter tyres would have been noisier.
 

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Although the winter tyres are softer, they have a more knobbly tread which I thought might make more noise - like 4x4s do at high speed.
 

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Have Bridgestone Turanzas fitted front, Michie energy (presume original) on rear. Had a mismatched pair of el cheapo's on front when I got the car about 2 months ago, one almost brand new, one almost worn out (ex hire car). That and the fact that the tracking was well out... Bridge's seem fine, bags of grip, don't appear too noisy, but nothing to make comparison with. Currently returning an average of around 47mpg (mixed driving). Was hoping to get 50+ in the Cee'd 1.6CRDI, but hey-ho. Last car was Fabia 1.9TDI estate. 137K/9yrs. Avg 44ish.
 

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Dervheid said:
Have Bridgestone Turanzas fitted front, Michie energy (presume original) on rear. Had a mismatched pair of el cheapo's on front when I got the car about 2 months ago, one almost brand new, one almost worn out (ex hire car). That and the fact that the tracking was well out... Bridge's seem fine, bags of grip, don't appear too noisy, but nothing to make comparison with. Currently returning an average of around 47mpg (mixed driving). Was hoping to get 50+ in the Cee'd 1.6CRDI, but hey-ho. Last car was Fabia 1.9TDI estate. 137K/9yrs. Avg 44ish.




Im just about to trade my fabia in for a cee'd
 

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To resurrect this thread for what its worth.

Front Michelin Energies replaced a few days ago as they were well and truly gone. After a lot of faffing about with various ideas and finding some stuff in stock and not other went for my second choice and stuck a pair of Pirelli P7s on the front.

Initial impressions are significantly less road noise and significantly increased steering feel; the latter being a rather pleasant surprise! Further impression will follow after a bit more use.
 

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My OE Michelins on the front of my SW 3 CRDi have needed replacing after 15,264 miles.
I have had Conti SportContact 3 225/45 R17 91W 's put on the rear and the rear Michelins moved to the front. I didn't think that I would notice much difference, but the road noise is considerably reduced. Even my wife noticed without any prompting from me.
The tyres cost £222.70 for the pair from Black Circles. That included fitting, balancing and disposal of the worn tyres. What did hurt was the £41.88 extra that I had (chose) to pay for balancing the other 2 Michelins and tracking adjustment.
I would hope to get another 7000 miles out of the Michelins, but am looking forward to having Contis all round.
 

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AlanHo said:
C weighting decibel figures are for the total sound frequency range.
A weighting covers only the frequency range of normal human hearing.

The A weighting is the response for the lowest sound level detectable by the ears. There is an assumption that the shape of the response is constant for all sound levels which makes it a flawed measure. Worse, it even assumes that sound levels that cause hearing damage has the same response.

AlanHo said:
What was interesting is that there is a section of the M42 near where I live that has a 1 mile section of concrete road which changes abruptly to tarmac. As the car moved from concrete to tarmac ""“ or vici versa ""“ my ears told me that there was a sudden and significant change in noise level between the tyres ""“ the concrete being noticeably more noisy. However the decibel meter readings did not confirm this.
Rather than use a sound level meter I have made recordings and view them on a spectrum analyser waterfall plot (vertical axis is time, the horizontal axis is frequency and the colour is amplitude). These are recordings of a Ceed, Primera and Fiesta at about 65-70mph:
http://tinyurl.com/7k8z66b
http://tinyurl.com/6srk9b7
http://tinyurl.com/7safxb5 (the horizontal blobs in this are people talking)
The very lowest frequencies (up to about 100Hz) show the Ceed is quietest on a sound level meter - probably about 4-6db better than the other two. The higher frequencies going up to 2000Hz show where a change of character comes from, but because they're 40-60db down they have very little influence on a sound level meter reading.

The Primera was on Avon ZV3 (subjectively quieter than Conti Eco or Pirelli P6000). The Ceed on Michelins. I now have some Bridgestones; subjectively quieter than the Michelins but I haven't done a recording.

By way of comparison this is a plot for some music (Eagles Hotel California)
http://tinyurl.com/7ch56hc
which shows how the spectrum is generally much flatter so that a sound level meter would be more influenced by small changes anywhere in the frequency band.
 

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Hi, Autoexpress rated these 1st for tyre noise achieving 100%
Continental ContiSportContact 3
 
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