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Engine and Turbo care

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    Posted: 01 Dec 2017 at 5:39pm
Found these useful tips, should help in keeping the Turbocharger from failing: -

Feel free to add your own or modify



DRIVING
1) When you get in your car and start your engine, DO NOT rev it or drive off the instant it fires. Allow the engine to idle naturally for a few seconds first: 10 seconds if already warm, 20 seconds if it’s been stood 2 hours or more and 30 seconds if it’s a frosty winters morning. Get in, start up, then put my seatbelt on and check mirrors, doors, radio etc etc whilst the engine idles. Keep feet off all pedals.
What this does is give the engine chance to get oil moving around all the vital parts under no load and thus minimise wear. It's especially beneficial to turbos, cams and cam chains, but also to bores and valve guides. It also gets fluid moving round the gearbox.

2)

When you drive off, don’t gun it down the road in first like you’re at Le Mans. Neither should you drive so gingerly the engine is labouring (with cars so quiet these days this can be hard to detect). Keep the engine in the lower portion of it’s power band using a moderate amount of throttle. Drive moderately and allow the engine to warm up for 5 miles


3) If you like your turbo engine for it’s performance, then don’t be afraid to use it. As above wait for the engine (and ‘box) to thoroughly warm through first, but when you do want that power avoid ‘snappy’ throttle operation. Open (and close) the throttle progressively and smoothly. Excessive rotational acceleration is hard on the turbo shaft and it’s bearings and can shorten their life, so keep that neck-snapping response for when you really need it.

4) A turbo engine gives of it’s best when it is nice and hot (on a petrol the turbo could be glowing orange). So, if you anticipate the need for a bit of overtaking ahead where you’re going to ask it to work hard, then get the engine and turbo nice and hot beforehand.

4)
If you’ve been working the engine hard (sporty driving, a heavy load, hilly country), NEVER pull up and just stop the engine. If the turbo is hot the heat soak can cause carbon build up in the oil feed pipe and shaft bearings. Allow the engine to idle for at least 30 seconds before shutting off. If it’s a petrol turbo, do so for longer. Some people have pulled on to their drive in the dark and lifted the bonnet to see the turbo glowing bright orange. Even leaving it idling with the bonnet up this can take 10 minutes to disappear. A much better solution is to drive the last few miles moderately if you can.


    5) If you’re rarely a sporty driver, get it nice and warm and treat it to an “Italian tune” once a quarter or so.


MAINTENANCE
Many components of a car are “fit and forget”, “sealed for life” these days (wheel bearings for example). Not so your engine and definitely not your turbo.


6) Change the oil regularly. Don’t be tempted to stretch the oil change interval to 2 years or 20,000 miles. These kind of intervals are to keep service costs down for fleet operators, not extend the life of your car for 100’s of 000’s of miles. It is strongly recommended changing oil at least once per year or at 8-10,000 miles. Drain from the sump rather sucking it out.

  1. Buy good quality oil that meets your manufacturers specifications and grade. If you’re changing regularly, don’t get hung up on ‘long life’ oil. Keep costs down by buying in bulk, or utilise Halfords offer of 4 litre for £12 twice a year.

  2. If you’ve just bought it and it’s got a few ‘000 on the clock, no matter what the service book says have the oil changed within a few weeks.


  3. If it’s a petrol, chances are the turbo is water cooled. Do not neglect to maintain the cooling system. Change the coolant at the manufacturers recommended interval or earlier if there is any signs of loss or corrosion in the header tank. I recommend a mix of 25% coolant, 75% de-ionised water and one bottle of water wetter. The UK climate only needs 25% and the reduced glycol increases the specific heat capacity of the mix (ie the coolant’s ability to move heat away from hot areas). The water wetter has extra anti corrosion package and helps improve the specific heat capacity further. Use a proprietary cooling system cleaner if you have any reason to suspect corrosion or scale (or even just for good measure), but flush it out thoroughly with a hose.


  4. At least every couple of years (or if you’ve just bought it) clean the compressor side of the turbo. Use a proprietary agent. I use Wynn’s Professional Turbo Cleaner available from GSF. With the engine stopped, remove the air inlet pipe and spray into the compressor, turn the vanes by hand. Also keep the crankcase breather system clear and clean. You may have to clear some misfire codes after cleaning (I use Torque app for Android).


  5. Whilst you’re cleaning the turbo, also clean the throttle body. Don’t swamp it, use an old toothbrush and some cloth.


  6. At least once in the life of the car, remove the intercooler and clean it out.


  7. Use good quality air filters. Dirt (even tiny dust particles) are the enemy of the compressor.



FOOD

15) Super unleaded and it’s diesel equivalent go through extra refining processes and so have less dissolved heavy compounds. This coupled with increased detergent packages help to keep the internals of your engine cleaner during their lifetime. This applies not only to the pistons and valves, but also to the turbo turbine. Using ‘Super’ can help prolong the life of this vital component. If your motor makes any extra power or economy on it too, then regard this as a bonus 

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Acenta View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Acenta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Dec 2017 at 5:58pm
Had turbo cars (petrol and diesel) since 1996. Just driven them normally all the time using the recommended fuel and lubricants having them serviced the the manufacturers recommendations (most at a franchised dealer).

Never had a single issue. Mostly they have been fueled at either Asda or Tesco.

Over those 21 or so years we have covered a total of 400,000 miles, probably more.

Just follow the manufacturers maintenance and enjoy.

There is one point in the above I would suggest is critically important:

Buy good quality oil that meets your manufacturers specifications and grade.

To do anything different would be crazy.

As for

"Super unleaded and it’s diesel equivalent go through extra refining processes and so have less dissolved heavy compounds. This coupled with increased detergent packages help to keep the internals of your engine cleaner during their lifetime. This applies not only to the pistons and valves, but also to the turbo turbine. Using ‘Super’ can help prolong the life of this vital component. If your motor makes any extra power or economy on it too, then regard this as a bonus"

its never been proven that the expensive stuff has any benefits, all pump fuel sold in the UK meets the relevant BS EN spec and that is all your car needs. As with oil follow the makers recommendations.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote smellmet Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Dec 2017 at 10:10am
Some of this is good practice, like not revving from cold and letting the engine idle before switching off. That being said I've had two turbos let go on me over the last 10 years or so. One in a 51 plate 320td Compact at 120k, which cost 1200 quid to put right, and let go when my mate revved too hard when the engine was cold, the other was in my 04 Saab 93 2.2TiD but that was the most unreliable heap of junk I've ever owned anyway.
Previous: 58 Kia Pro Cee'd 3 04 Saab 93 2.2 TiD Arc, 02 Citroen C5 2.2 HDi Exclusive, 51 BMW 320td, 52 Vectra 3.2 V6 GSi, 99 Honda Civic 1.8 VTi, 95 Nissan Primera 2.0 LX, 89/86 Nissan Bluebird 1.6 LX
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (1) Thanks(1)   Quote Crocoman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Dec 2017 at 10:19am
I do find it a little odd that we still have a somewhat ‘personal’ beef when someone mentions putting Super unleaded in their vehicle they need to justify and provide links to reports showing it makes a difference.

Weird.

Yes, regular unleaded meets standards but Super is better for my vehicle overall.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Acenta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Dec 2017 at 10:31am
Originally posted by Crocoman Crocoman wrote:

I do find it a little odd that we still have a somewhat ‘personal’ beef when someone mentions putting Super unleaded in their vehicle they need to justify and provide links to reports showing it makes a difference.

Weird.

Yes, regular unleaded meets standards but Super is better for my vehicle overall.

I have tried super unleaded (various brands) and super diesel in my cars from time to time and I have never noticed any car run any better nor have I seen any better MPG figures. Over 30 odd years never had an issue with supermarket fuel.

Not trying to justify it, just stating the facts.

If I had a car where the manufacturer specified 98 RON I would of course use it.

But for ordinary run of the mill cars pump fuel is all they need, anything else is just spending money unnecessarily. When you think about the number of complaints about mpg we see and rising fuel costs it beggars belief that some will spend money on supposedly better fuels that have never been scientifically proven to be better for ordinary cars i.e cars like we drive.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Turnup Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Dec 2017 at 12:19pm
Just reading in the Telegraph today (Honest John's motoring agony aunt) about concerns with cars with ISG stopping the engine without simmering the turbo.  It seems that some manufacturers at least will disable the ISG if the turbo is too hot.  The car in question was a Corsa - but this might well apply to other makers. 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Acenta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2017 at 4:02pm
I seem to remember that Honest John was sponsored by one of the major fuel companies. Whenever he was asked what is the best fuel the answer was always the same. And the question came up at frequent intervals to enable the same old answer to be restated time after time.

Maybe not that honest.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Turnup Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2017 at 4:28pm
He does seem to get a bee n his bonnet about some things.  Turbo simmering is one of them but I think he has something there because you can get turbo timer kits for most diesels.  Yes he does bang on about premium petrol too - I have not been able to find any difference. 
I recall one hapless motorist wrote to him about the behaviour of his Vauxhall Omega autobox.  When cold it would hold 1st until road speed was well up, and then behave perfectly normally thereafter.  HJ advised that there was a fault in the autobox and it needed expensive specialist attention.  At that time I had owned 3 Carltons and 2 Omegas successively (the Omega was a later version of the Carlton) and every one of them behaved exactly like that.  The Engines had hydraulic tappets and the behaviour was to get engine rpm above 3000 initially to get the oil pressure up quickly.  It's designed to do that.
 
So he is not always correct.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Acenta Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Dec 2017 at 4:42pm
Turbo issues related to them cooking their oil after turning off the engine was a common problem back in the 80's when they were first introduced onto mainstream cars. Manufacturers did various things to help, Renault even fitted a fan under the bonnet of the 5 that blew onto the turbo after the engine was turned off.

But things developed rapidly and one of the developments was better oil that is able to withstand the increased temps better and most turbo's are now water cooled.

Bought our first turbo diesel in 1996 and never let it idle on the drive or in a carpark after a run. But there again I did not trash it all the way to the front door. Had 8 turbo cars since and treated them all exactly the same and never had a single issue. Had a Seat Leon TSi and after a motorway run a the national limit the oil temp would be showing 100 C approx. Until the oil temp had dropped below 95 C Stop/Start would not work so VAG had included a simple way of protecting the turbo. It only took about 1/4 a mile of driving off the motorway for the temp to drop so things had well and truly cooled down before I stopped, Parking up at Motorway services would also see sufficient fall in temp to be safe.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote aircraft Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 06 Dec 2017 at 11:20pm
make sure to look after the turbo

message 57

a lot of hassle

"I had a terrible experience with the Kia warranty after owning the car for 4 years. My first service was out of the service window by 200 miles (because they couldn't book me in until the next week). In year 3 I had a warranty repair due to an engine harness rubbing through and cutting out the engine - no problems there. In year 4 the turbo blew, I had the car taken to the Kia dealership who asked for my service records - their computer systems didn't seem to record any of the services they do! I found all of the receipts and the log book then got a phone call to say I wouldn't be covered under warranty because the first servicewas out of the specified window... They said it was likely that the air filter would have been blocked putting strain on the turbo and it was my issue, a bill of £1300!!!

The long and short of it was I ended up speaking to their director or service and aftercare. with evidence that the turbo and air filter are signed off to 50,000 miles from an engineering testing perspective (from the direct supplier) and an air intake engineer for another OEM offering to back up my claim they only gave in when I started to post about my experience on public forums and a car blogging site got wind of it!

Needless to say I no longer own the Kia. As soon as they fixed it under warranty it was up for sale"
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